Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

Critically Important Planning Documents for All Albertans 18 and Over

Published

4 minute read

Critically Important Planning Documents for All Albertans 18 and Over

So now that we are doing our best to “flatten the curve” and all have some extra time on our hands, please take a break from stressing about the news or de-stressing with funny posts on social media to pay attention to another kind of critically important planning.

There are three very important advanced care planning documents that all Albertans over 18 years of age (and especially those of us with children) should have completed in order to be fully prepared for emergencies, like the current COVID-19 pandemic or much more common (but often, unexpected) events such as sudden illness or car accidents:

1) a Personal Directive – that states who would speak for you in making decisions about medical and personal care, if you become unable to speak for yourself (unconscious, unable to communicate). This person is called your “agent”,

2) an Enduring Power of Attorney – that states who would take care of your financial matters if you become unable/incapable of doing this yourself; and

3) a Will – that says how you want your estate to be handled after you die.

The Personal Directive has taken the place of what used to be called a “living will”. Information about what it is, the kinds of instructions to write, why you should write one and how to prepare a Personal Directive (as well as the other documents listed here) are available on the Government of Alberta website: http://www.alberta.ca . You can also download the Personal Directive form from that website. You do not need the help of a lawyer to fill it in. You can register your Personal Directive online but, most importantly, give a copy to the Agent you named in the document and keep a copy in with other important documents in your home. You can also give a copy to your Family Physician to keep with your medical record.

It is recommended that you consult a lawyer to create the Enduring Power of Attorney and Will documents. The Government of Alberta website includes instructions about how to get this kind of legal help. If you die without a Will, the Government will do the work to settle your estate but they will also take the cost of this service out of the inheritance that you have worked hard to leave to your loved ones.

Another excellent website that can help as you go through the process of thinking about and sharing your wishes for future health and personal care is: http://www.advancedcareplanning.ca. The slogan for their 2020 Speak Up Canada campaign is “A Life Well Lived is a Life Well Planned”. In this time of uncertainty, ensuring that you have done all you can to be sure that your loved ones have the best tools to help you in case of emergency can give us all some peace of mind.

Dr Maureen McCall, MD, MPH, CCFP Palliative Care Physician, Red Deer

Click to learn more.

Renee at Primary Care Network has some tips on managing anxiety

Red Deer Primary Care Network (RDPCN) is a partnership between Family Doctors and Alberta Health Services.Health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, nurses and pharmacists work in clinics alongside family doctors.In addition, programs and groups are offered at the RDPCN central location. This improves access to care, health promotion, chronic disease management and coordination of care. RDPCN is proud of the patient care offered, the effective programs it has designed and the work it does with partners in health care and the community. www.reddeerpcn.com

Follow Author

More from this author
Community / 4 days ago

So many losses to cope with

Community / 5 days ago

Dealing with Distress 

Community / 2 weeks ago

Engaging in Mindfulness

Alberta

Alberta First Nation monitors hundreds for COVID-19 as it announces curfew

Published on

SIKSIKA NATION, Alta. — A First Nation in southern Alberta has implemented a curfew as its health workers monitor more than 200 people for signs they may have developed COVID-19.

Siksika Nation Chief Ouray Crowfoot said in video messages posted on Facebook that as of Thursday there were 21 known COVID-19 positive cases with links to the community west of Calgary, and that five separate and unrelated case clusters had been uncovered in the previous 12 days.

Crowfoot said that as of Wednesday, 258 Siksika Nation members were under “active investigation and daily followup” by the community’s health services team — a number he said had quadrupled in only three days.

On Friday, councillors approved a temporary curfew from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time, with exceptions that Crowfoot said can be made on an as-needed basis for work or other reasons.

Crowfoot encouraged Siksika Nation members to co-operate with health officials if they call, and to avoid non-essential travel to nearby cities. 

He said the risk of community transmission is high and that each new case cluster makes it even harder to contact trace and isolate people fast enough.

“We realize you have freedom of choice but we don’t have freedom of consequence. If we choose not to follow these guidelines, the consequence may be that we contract the virus and spread the virus further through our community,” Crowfoot warned in a video message posted Thursday.

In a message posted Friday, Crowfoot said his community had met meeting with federal Indigenous Services Minister Marc Miller and Alberta Indigenous Affairs Minister Rick Wilson to address shortfalls in resources for dealing with the pandemic.

Crowfoot said the community’s annual Sun Dance ceremony was continuing, but that each participant was being tested prior to entering and that health workers were screening people as they came and went.

“It is understandable that people may feel anxious regarding this current situation, but if we continue to stay vigilant to the public health measures and do our best to limit travel and to avoid gatherings we have a chance to slow down the spread on our nation and also give our health team a chance to do their job,” Crowfoot said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on July 4, 2020

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Attendance for Alberta MPs at special COVID-19 committee since the end of May

Published on

EDMONTON — The average attendance for Alberta’s Conservative MPs for a special COVID-19 committee, which has acted as a stand-in for the chamber, was about 42 per cent from May 27 to June 18.

The only other Alberta MP, Edmonton Strathcona NDP member Heather McPherson, attended all 14 meetings. She says she’s shocked by the low attendance of her colleagues.

Here’s the attendance for the province’s 33 Conservative MPs:

— Edmonton Manning MP Ziad Aboultaif: 4 of 14 (29 per cent)

— Foothills MP John Barlow: 6 of 14 (43 per cent)

— Calgary Heritage MP Bob Benzen: 0 of 14

— Red Deer-Lacombe MP Blaine Calkins: 9 of 14 (64 per cent)

— St. Albert-Edmonton MP Michael Cooper: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Edmonton Centre MP James Cumming: 13 of 14 (93 per cent)

— Edmonton Greisbach MP Kerry Diotte: 5 of 14 (36 per cent)

— Red Deer-Mountain View MP Earl Dreeshen: 10 of 14 (71 per cent)

— Sherwood Park-Fort Saskatchewan MP Garnett Genuis: 12 of 14 (86 per cent)

— Calgary Forest Lawn MP Jasraj Singh Hallan: 6 of 14 (43 per cent)

— Lethbridge MP Rachael Harder: 7 of 14 (50 per cent)

— Edmonton Riverbend MP Matt Jeneroux: 0 of 14

— Calgary Rocky Ridge MP Pat Kelly: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Calgary Shepard MP Tom Kmiec: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Battle River-Crowfoot MP Damien Kurek: 13 of 14 (93 per cent)

— Calgary Midnapore MP Stephanie Kusie: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Edmonton-Wetaskawin MP Mike Lake: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Calgary Signal Hill MP Ron Liepert: 0 of 14

— Sturgeon River-Parkland MP Dane Lloyd: 3 of 14 (21 per cent)

— Edmonton West MP Kelly McCauley: 9 of 14 (64 per cent)

— Calgary Centre MP Greg McLean: 12 of 14 (86 per cent)

— Medicine Hat-Cardston-Warner MP Glen Motz: 13 of 14 (93 per cent)

— Calgary Nose Hill MP Michelle Rempel Garner: 12 of 14 (86 per cent)

— Banff-Airdrie MP Blake Richards: 3 of 14 (21 per cent)

— Calgary Skyview MP Jag Sahota: 5 of 14 (36 per cent)

— Bow River MP Martin Shields: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Yellowhead MP Gerald Soroka: 12 of 14 (86 per cent)

— Lakeland MP Shannon Stubbs: 12 of 14 (86 per cent)

— Edmonton Mill Woods MP Tim Uppal: 4 of 14 (29 per cent)

— Peace River-Westlock MP Arnold Viersen: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Grande Praire-Mackenzie MP Chris Warkentin: 2 of 14 (14 per cent)

— Calgary Confederation MP Len Webber: 0 of 14

— Fort McMurray-Cold Lake MP David Yurdiga: 10 of 14 (71 per cent)

Source: Minutes for the Special Committee on the COVID-19 Pandemic, House of Commons

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

july, 2020

No Events

Trending

X