Connect with us

Community

Lesley’s story: I Have the Tools I Need

Published

3 minute read

Lesley, a senior living alone, has a history of depression, anxiety and obesity. She had attended a number of RDPCN group programs including Sleep, Happiness Basics and Health Basics and has regular appointments with the psychologist who suggested the Family Nurse could provide her with general support. Lesley had regular visits with the family nurse prior to Covid. Once Covid hit, Lesley felt isolated, lonely, depressed, anxious and sometimes angry. She was no longer exercising or eating heathy and her weight was increasing. Lesley had achieved a 30-pound weight loss, so she did not want to gain it all back. At this point she and the family nurse agreed on weekly phone calls.

The nurse connected her to the Zoom program from an Edmonton PCN titled Senior Centre without Walls. They offered 4 one-hour programs per day and Lesley connected to all of these and found them incredibly helpful. She was part of a group and had something to look forward to each day. Prior to Covid, Lesley enjoyed the interaction with people by volunteering at the library but with the library shut down, that had disappeared. The nurse helped her to dust off and use all of the tools she gained from previous programs and put them back in use- grocery shopping strategies, mindfulness, and gratitude for all she has for example. Other soothing strategies she uses includes hugging yourself and tapping your fingers on your own shoulders. They also chatted about motivation and Lesley said that really helped her to refocus on her overall goal of maintaining health and independence. She started to exercise again and found being outside helped her mood. She could nod at people from afar and enjoy nature. She now enjoys each day and rarely gets wrapped up in what is to come. She has significantly decreased the time she watches the news. She is back to using the food and activity log and slowly losing weight. And she is back to volunteering and really happy to be back at the library.

Lesley is very thankful for the support of the family nurse and their regular calls have moved to monthly as Lesley feels she has a much healthier perspective and is coping better. She is concerned about the winter but knows with the tools she has learned and uses, that she will get through.

To learn more about the RDPCN programs, visit www.reddeerpcn.com

Laura’s story: I Feel So Much Better

Red Deer Primary Care Network (RDPCN) is a partnership between Family Doctors and Alberta Health Services. Health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, nurses and pharmacists work in clinics alongside family doctors. In addition, programs and groups are offered at the RDPCN central location. This improves access to care, health promotion, chronic disease management and coordination of care. RDPCN is proud of the patient care offered, the effective programs it has designed and the work it does with partners in health care and the community. www.reddeerpcn.com

Follow Author

More from this author

Community

Fill those yellow bags to ease shortages at the Red Deer Food Bank

Published on

Article submitted by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Red Deer Food Bank is consistently running out of specific food items. On October 23, Red Deer residents in the north half of the city are invited to participate in a food drive to help feed hungry central Alberta families.

It’s not surprising that the Red Deer Food Bank is experiencing increased demand in the middle of a pandemic. While the food bank is doing a good job of meeting the needs of most users, there have been shortages in some food items. “We consistently run out of specific items like Kraft Dinner, canned beans and canned fruit,” explained Mitch Thomson, executive director of the Red Deer Food Bank. “We’ve been holding our own, but we’re consistently unable to provide those items. Forty percent of those served by the Red Deer Food Bank are children and comfort foods like macaroni and cheese is always in demand.” Other items that are always in demand include canned vegetables, tomato sauce, spaghetti sauce, and canned dinners like beefaroni and hearty soups. All food
donations are used and appreciated.

How COVID has Affected the Red Deer Food Bank

The citizens of Red Deer have been very supportive of the Red Deer Food Bank and that has allowed the food bank to meet the increased needs it has seen since the pandemic began. It’s important to note that the Red Deer Food Bank supports 23 other food banks. It’s the only food bank in central Alberta that is
open five days a week and users come from Red Deer as well as other locations in the region. COVID has also resulted in a decrease in the numbers of volunteers who can assist stocking shelves, assembling and handing out hampers, and sorting donated food.

What’s New at the Red Deer Food Bank

The Red Deer Food Bank is getting a more functional truck to transport food thanks to support from local donors. They’ve also moved bays, so that the warehouse area is now right next to the food bank.

A COVID-Friendly Food Drive

Food drives organized by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Red Deer have become an important way for the Red Deer Food Bank to stock its shelves. The upcoming food drive will involve additional precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. “Volunteers will drop off bags on the doorsteps of homes beginning on October 18 and then pick them up on October 23 without making any personal contact,” explained Allison Strate, Red Deer Stake Food Drive Coordinator. “The bags will then be transported to the church and be placed on a truck to go to the Red Deer Foodbank. All volunteers will be wearing the appropriate personal protective equipment. We are hoping it will all run smoothly. We believe we can safely run the spring food drive and with the help of local citizens collect much needed food for those in need.”

How to Participate in the Fall Food Drive

Bags will be delivered to the doorsteps of homes on the north side of the city the week of October 18 and they will be picked up on Saturday October 23 between 10 am and 12 noon and delivered to the Red Deer Food Bank.

All north-area residents are reminded to please support the food bank by leaving a food donation on their doorstep on Saturday, October 23. Anyone who does not get a yellow bag in their mailbox is welcome to bring donations to the Kentwood chapel of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (8 Keast Way) between 10 am and noon on Saturday, October 23. Any community members or groups that would like to assist in delivering or picking up bags are welcome to contact Alison Strate, the Red Deer Stake Food Drive Coordinator at [email protected]

The Red Deer food drives are part of a series of food drives organized by members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “The food drive is a huge undertaking with hundreds of volunteers working together for a really important cause,” says Allison Strate, Red Deer Stake Food Drive Coordinator. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to provide an important service to families and individuals who need help from the Red Deer Food Bank to put food on their tables.”

Continue Reading

Central Alberta

Trevor’s Story: I Have Anxiety and Depression. Where Can I Get Help?

Published on

Trevor has suffered from anxiety and depression for a while. He had no idea where or how to get help with this. In discussing this with his doctor, he was referred to a Mental Health Counselor at Red Deer Primary Care Network.

Trevor says, “I, the skeptic, didn’t expect that I would get much help but did decide to work with the counselor. I needed to do something. We had 6 sessions together. The counselor provided me with insight on things that should have been so obvious to me but they weren’t. You don’t know what you don’t know. The counselor provided me with very practical and valuable tools. I came away with a different, more positive way to think about things. And it was just great to have a non-judgmental person to listen to me. It is a relief to just be able to tell someone who was really listening about my struggles.

These sessions were so valuable. I am in a much better state than I was. My struggles are not over but I manage to get through each day using the tools and improved mindset that I learned.

If anyone else is struggling like me I recommend no matter if they think it won’t help  just go, go in with an open mind. Even if you just feel you need someone to talk to you will get valuable tools to help manage your situation.”

To learn more about the RDPCN programs, visit www.reddeerpcn.com

Read more Success Stories from the Red Deer Primary Care Network.

Looking After Myself

Continue Reading

Trending

X