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Why We Remember

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Why we remember 

To remember not only the fallen, but the sacrifices made by the living who have experienced horrors which are simply beyond the comprehension of the unindoctrinated. 

To acknowledge the sacrifice made by the families of the fallen, and of all those who have served and who are still serving. 

Because nobody ever truly comes home from war. Only a version of yourself returns. A haunted version, whose very soul has been irreversibly stained by the realization that Satan is in fact real, and he does indeed cajole decent people into doing awful things.

It’s the understanding of how unspeakably horrible one person can be to another. War forever taints you. Witnessing a flagrant disregard for the sanctity of life is not something you can unsee. It is this stain which affects every aspect of your civilian life, often for the rest of your life. 

We remember our soldiers because they bear a terrible burden, so that others will never have to carry the painful weight of freedom.

To acknowledge the privilege we enjoy, of living in a peaceful country where our children can safely walk to school without the fear of their school being bombed. 

We remember, because we acknowledge that we can’t ever fully appreciate the sacrifices, so we remember in lieu of understanding. 

We remember, because it’s the best we can do, and the least we should do to honor our soldiers, sailors, and airmen both past and present. 

We remember, because they likely know the unforgettable stench of burning human flesh, and the sound of the screams of the burning. 

We remember them, because they can not forget. 

We remember, because the survivors often struggle from debilitating depression, relentless nightmares, and uncontrollable anger. 

We remember because veterans are at a much higher risk of suicide. 

We remember them, because many of them can never find peace.

We remember them, because we don’t carry the burden of becoming them. 

On November the 11th, we will remove our hats, stand for our two minutes of silence, and we will remember them. 


Mark E. Meincke
Veteran
Host of: Operation Tango Romeo, the trauma recovery podcast 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

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Alberta

Calgary Stampede receives $10M from federal government to aid recovery from pandemic

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Calgary – The Calgary Stampede has received more than $10 million from the federal government to help it bounce back after last year’s event was scaled down due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

A report to the city this week showed the Stampede had an operating loss of $8.3 million in 2021.

Last year’s Stampede ran at half capacity because of COVID-19 public health measures and was cancelled all-together the year before.

Daniel Vandal, the federal minister for Prairies Economic Development Canada, says the money aims to support a full-scale Stampede to deliver the “authentic western experience” this year.

He says it would also help to reignite Alberta’s visitor economy.

The 2022 Stampede is set to run from July 8 to 17.

“Festivals large and small were hard hit during the pandemic,” Vandal said in a news release. “They are events where families and friends come together and take in the exciting atmosphere.

“The tourism industry is facing a strong comeback providing quality jobs across the country, showcasing stunning landscapes and offering exciting experiences right here in Alberta.”

The federal government also provided about $1.8 million for four other tourism projects in southern Alberta: Charmed Resorts, Cochrane Tourism Association, Heritage Park and Tourism Calgary.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 30, 2022.

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Alberta

Alberta Utilities Commission approves $31M ATCO fine, says in public interest

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The Alberta Utilities Commission has approved a $31-million fine proposed for ATCO Electric’s attempts to overcharge ratepayers for costs it shouldn’t have incurred.

In April, ATCO Electric agreed to pay the penalty after a commission investigation found it deliberately overpaid a First Nation group for work on a new transmission line.

It said ATCO also failed to disclose the reasons for the overpayment when it applied to be reimbursed by ratepayers for the extra cost.

But in May, the Consumers’ Coalition of Alberta said the proposed settlement doesn’t adequately compensate people in the province for the harm they have suffered.

The commission says in its ruling that after carefully considering the settlement agreement, it is satisfied that accepting it is consistent with the public interest.

The commission also says the agreement would not bring the administration of justice into disrepute.

“The commission considers that the settlement is fit and reasonable, falling within a range of reasonable outcomes given the circumstances,” reads the ruling released Wednesday.

The settlement came after an investigation into a complaint that ATCO Electric sole-sourced a contract in 2018 for work needed for a transmission line to Jasper, Alta.

The agreement says that was partly because another of Calgary-based ATCO’s subsidiaries had a deal with a First Nation for projects, including for work camps on the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion.

The statement of facts says ATCO Electric feared that if it didn’t grant the Jasper contract to the First Nation, it might back out of its deal with ATCO Structures and Logistics. It’s illegal for a regulated utility to benefit a non-regulated company in this way.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 29, 2022.

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