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RDC’s Movies Worth Watching celebrates 30th Anniversary of Willow

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  • Upcoming January Events: RDC’s School of Creative Arts

    Red Deer, January 3, 2018 – Red Deer College invites central Albertans to join us as the School of Creative Arts brings creativity to life throughout an exciting season of diverse performances, concerts, screenings and exhibitions. RDC’s talented students, instructors, staff and special guests will present the following events throughout the month of January:

    Movies Worth Watching Series

    Willow (1988) 30th Anniversary Event
    January 11 & 12 at 7pm – admission $5 – rating PG 

    This epic Lucas film fantasy serves up enough magical adventure to satisfy fans of the genre, though it treads familiar territory. With abundant parallels to Star Wars, the story (by George Lucas) follows the exploits of the little farmer Willow (Warwick Davis), an aspiring sorcerer appointed to deliver an infant princess from the evil queen (Jean Marsh) to whom the child is a crucial threat. Val Kilmer plays the warrior who joins Willow’s campaign with the evil queen’s daughter (Joanne Whalley, who later married Kilmer). Impressive production values, stunning locations (in England, Wales, and New Zealand) and dazzling special effects energize the routine fantasy plot, which alternates between rousing action and cute sentiment while failing to engage the viewer’s emotions.

    Movies Worth Watching brings a variety of classic films that best viewed on the BIG screen. Join us to see the best Hollywood has to offer. Every screening is preceded by an MPA student film that we know you will love. For detailed information visit rdc.ab.ca/showtime.

    A Frosty Affair (2015)

    January 26 & 27  Welikoklad Event Centre Cinema at 7:00 pm – Admission by donation

    A Frosty Affair is not the latest Canadian weather forecast, but the title of the newest feature film shot in Edmonton by RDC Alumni.

    For complete details on RDC’s 2017-18 School of Creative Arts season, please visit School of Creative Arts Showtime.

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    National

    Alberta university criticized for plan to bestow honorary degree on David Suzuki

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  • EDMONTON — The University of Alberta is being criticized for its decision to give David Suzuki an honorary degree.

    Earlier this month, the university announced that the longtime environmentalist will be one of 13 people to receive the honour later this spring.

    Andrew Leach, the architect of Alberta’s climate change plan and an economics professor at the university, isn’t pleased.

    “He refers to economics as brain damage,” Leach wrote on Twitter. “The @ualberta has 3 departments teaching economics. Is that really the type of public education that my university wants to reward with an honorary degree?”

    Some in the oil and gas industry and others from the Opposition United Conservative Party were also critical of the decision on social media.

    Suzuki wasn’t available to comment Thursday, but his foundation sent out a statement.

    “As Canada seeks to meet its Paris climate accord target and transition to a sustainable renewable energy future, the expansion of Canada’s oilsands has become an extremely divisive subject — as we’re seeing with the Kinder Morgan pipeline project,” said chief executive Steve Cornish.

    An honorary degree is not a blind endorsement of Suzuki’s perspectives, he said.

    “It’s a tribute to Dr. Suzuki’s incredible career as an awarded geneticist, broadcaster and author,” said Cornish.

    The university defended its decision to honour Suzuki.

    “We understand how important the oil and gas industry is to Alberta,” the school said in a statement. “We, too, are acutely aware of the anger and frustration with the current situation surrounding the Trans Mountain Pipeline.”

    The university said an honorary degree doesn’t necessarily mean the institution agrees with the person, but rather recognizes his or her contributions and full body of work.

    Suzuki is to receive being given the honorary doctor of science degree on June 7.

    Leach, who declined an interview request, said on Twitter that he was glad his economics students would be convocating on another day.

    “It saves me from a horrible decision I’d have to make: there’s no way I’d share a stage with David Suzuki as he receives an honorary degree from @ualberta,” he wrote. “Not a chance.”

    Colette Derworiz, The Canadian Press


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    National

    Acquittal of teacher who secretly videoed teens ‘dangerous,’ top court told

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  • TORONTO — Canada’s top court is set to hear the case on Friday of a high school teacher acquitted of voyeurism even though he used a pen camera to secretly record video of the chest area of his female students.

    The case raised eyebrows when the trial judge decided Ryan Jarvis, of London, Ont., had violated the teens’ privacy but had no sexual intent in doing so.

    The Ontario Court of Appeal — in a split decision — disagreed with the judge on both key points, but nevertheless upheld the acquittal. While Jarvis was surely sexually motivated, the Appeal Court said, the students had no reasonable expectation of privacy at school where the filming occurred.

    In its appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada, the prosecution maintains the Appeal Court’s view of privacy was far too narrow.

    “The students had a reasonable expectation that they were in circumstances where their privacy interests related to their sexual integrity would be protected,” the government says in its written filing. “Here the impact of the recording on the students’ dignity and sexual integrity was significant.”

    Jarvis, however, maintains the students were in classrooms or other common areas where anyone could observe them. Concluding they had a reasonable privacy expectation, he says, could see the criminalization of a wide range of conduct, such as staring at someone from behind tinted sunglasses.

    “Reasonable people can debate whether all surreptitious recording of people for a sexual purpose should be made a criminal offence,” Jarvis says. “(But) the court should be very hesitant to expand the concept of ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’…lest it disturb the delicate balance the courts have attempted to strike between the interests of the state and the individual.”

    Police charged the English teacher with voyeurism for recordings he made in 2010 and 2011 as he chatted with 27 female students aged 14 to 18. The offence requires two key elements: the accused must be sexually motivated and the target must have a reasonable expectation of privacy.

    In November 2015, Superior Court Justice Andrew Goodman decried the teacher’s behaviour as “morally repugnant and professionally objectionable.” Goodman found the students did have a reasonable expectation of privacy but, in a strange twist, acquitted Jarvis on the basis he had no sexual purpose.

    “While a conclusion that the accused was photographing the students’ cleavage for a sexual purpose is most likely,” Goodman found, “There may be other inferences.”

    The Crown argued on appeal that sexual motivation was a no-brainer: The subjects were young females and Jarvis had deliberately pointed his camera at their breasts.

    The majority on the Appeal Court agreed. However, in upholding the acquittal in October, justices Kathryn Feldman and David Watt decided the teens had no reasonable expectation of privacy.

    “If a person is in a public place, fully clothed and not engaged in toileting or sexual activity, they will normally not be in circumstances that give rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy,” the justices said.

    Justice Grant Huscroft dissented, writing that the privacy interests of the students outweighed the interests of those who would compromise their personal and sexual integrity at school.

    “Privacy expectations need not be understood in an all-or-nothing fashion,” Huscroft said, drawing on an example of a mother breast-feeding in public. “There is a reasonable expectation that she will not be visually recorded surreptitiously for a sexual purpose.”

    In its appeal to the Supreme Court, the prosecution seized on Huscroft’s dissenting opinion.

    “The majority was so focused on a conception of reasonable expectation of privacy based on the ability to exclude others from a location, they failed to appreciate that the trust relationship, along with a school board policy, was a significant factor which gave rise to a reasonable expectation of privacy,” the government argues. 

    The Samuelson-Glushko Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, one of eight interveners in the case, urged the Supreme Court to convict Jarvis.

    “The Ontario Court of Appeal’s majority decision in this case sets a dangerous precedent in terms of the privacy, bodily and sexual integrity, and equality of young Canadians in schools, with especially disturbing implications for girls and young women,” the foundation says.

    The Ontario College of Teachers suspended Jarvis in 2013 for failing to pay his dues. He still faces a professional misconduct hearing.

    Colin Perkel, The Canadian Press


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