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Alberta

PETER VON TIESENHAUSEN’S EPIC ART

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from the Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Awards Foundation

Peter von Tiesenhausen, a Lieutenant Governor of Alberta 2015 Distinguished Artist, spent the past six months hunkered down in Demmit Alberta building a deluxe playground for the community center – and musing about connectedness, the importance of social interaction and his role as an artist in the social contract.

Peter’s last project prior to the March 2020 COVID-19 lockdown was the installation of Things I Knew to be True in the newly renovated Stanley A. Milner Public Library, part of the City of Edmonton’s public art collection.

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Alberta

Trevali plans to reopen New Brunswick’s Caribou zinc mine but with 150 fewer staff

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CALGARY — Trevali Mining Corp. says it plans to reopen its Caribou Mine near Bathurst, N.B., after idling it 10 months ago amid poor zinc prices, but will operate it with a workforce of about 250, down from about 400 employees and contractors before it was closed.

The Vancouver-based miner says it expects to return to mining in early February, with first payable zinc production expected by the end of March.

Chief financial officer Brendan Creaney says zinc prices have rebounded from about 82 cents US per pound when mine production stopped to the current level between US$1.20 and US$1.30 and Trevali has contracted about 80 per cent of Caribou’s volumes for two years to remove price risk.

The company says it has brought in Redpath Mining Inc. as an underground mining contractor and its expertise and supply of larger equipment is expected to allow production to resume at cash flow positive costs of between 84 and 90 cents cents per pound of zinc by 2022.

It hopes to produce up to 65 million pounds of payable zinc, 23 million pounds of lead and 650,000 ounces of silver in 2021. Zinc output is expected to rise to as much as 77 million pounds in 2022.

It plans capital spending at the mine of $9 million this year and $2 million next year.

“Our initial two-year plan includes several enhancements which are designed to improve the mine’s economics, including the involvement of a contracted mining operator and the entry into fixed-pricing arrangements for a significant portion of the mine’s forecasted production,” said Trevali CEO Ricus Grimbeek.

“Looking ahead, we will continue to study the potential to extend our initial mine plan, as well as explore further potential in the Bathurst mining camp.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 15, 2021.

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The Canadian Press

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Alberta

French oil giant Total leaves U.S. energy group, months after exiting CAPP

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CALGARY — French oil and gas company Total says it will ditch its membership in the U.S.-based American Petroleum Institute because it disagrees on climate-related policies.

The move announced Friday follows its decision last July to drop out of the Calgary-based Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers and write off $9.3-billion worth of oilsands assets in Alberta.

Total said in a statement Friday it would not renew its membership for 2021 following an analysis of API’s position on climate issues that has shown “certain divergences.”

The company notably mentions API’s “support during the recent elections to candidates who argued against the United States’ participation” in the 2015 Paris Agreement to curb climate change.

Total says it is working to provide cleaner energy and its CEO, Patrick Pouyanne, said the group wants to ensure that “the industry associations of which we are a member adopt positions and messages that are aligned with those of the group in the fight against climate change.”

Total said last summer it was leaving CAPP because of a “misalignment” between the organization’s public positions and those expressed in Total’s climate ambition statement announced last May.

At the time, CAPP CEO Tim McMillan called the decision “disappointing” and Alberta Energy Minister Sonya Savage called it “highly-hypocritical” given Total’s investments in other parts of the world.

Total’s decision to leave the API is significant, said Peter Frumhoff, the director of science and policy at the U.S.-based Union of Concerned Scientists.

“It’s a very big deal for an oil major to take a position basically leaving the major trade association here in the United States,” he said.

With more than 600 members, API represents all segments of the oil and natural gas industry in the U.S.

Frumhoff said the move came just days after API’s president, Mike Summers, made a speech in which he said the group would fight regulation of methane emissions, restrictions on drilling on public lands and support for charging infrastructure for electric vehicles.

He added that Total’s decision put pressure on oil companies BP and Shell, which both said they aim at fighting greenhouse gas emissions, “to put their political power where their mouth is and do the same.”

President-elect Joe Biden, who has said he wants to focus on fighting climate change, has pledged to have the U.S. rejoin the Paris accord on the first day of his presidency.

With files from the Associated Press

The Canadian Press

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january, 2021

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