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Advance Care Planning: Preparing for Your Future Healthcare

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3 minute read

Are you prepared?

All Albertans should prepare for a possible scenario where they may be unable to make their own medical decisions, especially if they are older or have chronic or serious illness.

If you became seriously ill, would your family, caregivers and healthcare providers know how you would want to be cared for? Who would speak for you if you were too sick to speak for yourself?

Learn more about advance care planning.

Advance Care Planning

A way to help you think about, talk about and document wishes for health care in the event that you become incapable of consenting to or refusing treatment or other care.

You may never need your advance care plan – but if you do, you’ll be glad that it’s there and that you have had these conversations, to make sure that your voice is heard when you cannot speak for yourself.

Goals of Care Designation

A medical order used to describe and communicate the general aim or focus of care including the preferred location of that care.

Although advance care planning conversations don’t always result in determining goal of care designation, they make sure your voice is heard when you cannot speak for yourself

Medical Care icon

Medical Care

Focuses on medical tests and interventions to cure or manage a person’s illness, but does not use resuscitative or life support measures.

Comfort Care

Comfort Care

Focuses on providing comfort for people with life-limiting illness when medical treatment is no longer an option.

Resuscitative Care

Resuscitative Care

Focuses on prolonging or preserving life using medical or surgical interventions, including, if needed, resuscitation and intensive care.

Learn about Goals of Care Designation ordersIf you can’t speak for yourself, your Goals of Care Designation helps the healthcare team match your values and preferences to care that is right for you and your healthcare condition.

Personal directive: Choose your decision-makerYour personal directive is a legal document. It names someone you trust to make important decisions for you if you can’t make these decisions yourself.

Keep advance care planning documents in a Green SleeveThis is a plastic pocket that holds your advance care planning forms.

Resources | video libraryGet more information on advance care planning and find more resources to help you or explore our video library.

 

Red Deer Primary Care Network (RDPCN) is a partnership between Family Doctors and Alberta Health Services. Health professionals such as psychologists, social workers, nurses and pharmacists work in clinics alongside family doctors. In addition, programs and groups are offered at the RDPCN central location. This improves access to care, health promotion, chronic disease management and coordination of care. RDPCN is proud of the patient care offered, the effective programs it has designed and the work it does with partners in health care and the community. www.reddeerpcn.com

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Take the Family Friendly Challenge to help your kids grow up great!

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Submitted by Alberta Health Services 

SPARC Red Deer & Sylvan Lake Family Challenge

SPARC Red Deer and SPARC Sylvan Lake, are pleased to announce a free, fun family challenge to run in the month of November.

The SPARC Family Challenge offers 4 weeks of simple, free, family-friendly challenges, to complete at home or in your community, to help your kids grow up great! By participating in the SPARC Family Challenge, you can create strong positive connections with your kids and within your family. The purpose is to educate families about the 40 Developmental Assets, which are research-proven life experiences or building blocks which all children need to grow up healthy, caring, and responsible.

Research shows that the higher number of these assets a young person has, the more likely they are to thrive and to engage in positive behaviours, and avoid risky behaviours. Through every day, achievable activities, we can build assets in our kids and help them thrive.

Families will have a choice between two options each week that meet their own family interests and capabilities. Families can win awesome prizes at the end of the 4 weeks by completing the post survey.

For more information, and to register, visit sparcreddeer.ca and follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Registration deadline is October 26th.

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Alberta

Alberta announces combined $187 million in addictions and homelessness funding

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By Rob Drinkwater in Edmonton

The Alberta government has announced more than $124 million over two years for addiction and mental health services in Edmonton and Calgary, with another $63 million aimed at reducing homelessness in the province over the same period.

The funding for Edmonton and Calgary will go toward increasing treatment spaces while expanding addiction services, with $70 million earmarked for capital spending and $54 million to assist operations.

A 75-bed, co-ed long-term treatment facility is planned to be operational in Edmonton by the end of 2023, while a similar facility is to be built in Calgary by early 2024.

The $63 million is to support steps outlined in the government’s action plan on homelessness.

Premier Jason Kenney stressed his government’s recovery-based approach to the addictions issue when he announced the funding Saturday, calling British Columbia’s recent move to decriminalize the possession of small amounts of hard drugs in January “reckless.”

“In the area of addressing addictions, there are many that believe recovery is a false hope. It’s not possible, and instead what we should do is actually to facilitate dangerous addictions rather than to offer an off-ramp to freedom from addiction,” Kenney said during the announcement at Edmonton’s Herb Jamieson Centre.

“The whole point is to give people a fighting chance to escape from the grips of addiction so they have the opportunity to build a new, safe fulfilling life.

“Recovery works. It’s not a new concept or an untested Utopian theory,” he said.

Under the Alberta plan, the number of winter shelter spaces will be expanded in communities like Edmonton, Wetaskiwin and Lethbridge, and in rural communities where there is an urgent and unmet need.

All provincially funded shelters will also provide round-the-clock access seven days a week, while funding will be equalized between community-based organizations in Edmonton and Calgary.

The funding will include $5 million to create up to 450 additional shelter spots in Edmonton, bringing the number of emergency spaces in the city to over 1,000.

The plan also includes $2.5 million in 2022-2023 to test the so-called service hub model in two pilot programs in Calgary and Edmonton. These six-month long programs will connect people directly with support and services such as addictions recovery, housing and emergency financial support, beginning this fall.

Meanwhile, the addictions funding will be used to increase the ability of direct outreach teams through Edmonton police and Alberta Health Services to provide support and overdose prevention services. The same expansion of services will also be carried out in Calgary.

Edmonton police chief Dale McFee lauded the fact that housing options include support for mental health and addictions as he personally thanked Kenney for the new funding.

“This is the biggest single investment that I’ve ever seen over the course of my career in actually addressing the system versus putting more money into silos that are actually generating a lot of the problem,” McFee said at the announcement.

Edmonton Mayor Amarjeet Sohi said the funding would tackle the root causes of homelessness, and also praised the fact the province was delivering on a request to provide enhanced plans when prisoners are discharged from corrections facilities.

In July, the city requested a hub where social workers, firefighters and peace officers could work together to reduce crime and address a spike in violence downtown, in nearby Chinatown and and on the transit system.

“These investments show our collaborative approach is working, and together we are making life better for struggling Edmontonians,” Sohi said at the announcement.

But NDP Critic for Seniors and Housing Lori Sigurdson said in a news release that Kenney’s government has cut funding for housing, noting buildings that could have opened months ago are sitting empty because the government hasn’t provided operational funding.

“The money announced today does not even begin to address the deeper need for permanent supportive housing, social housing and affordable housing in this province,” she said.

According to the province, over 6,400 Albertans were experiencing homelessness— including nearly 4,000 using emergency shelters or on the streets — as of Jan. 31.

Alberta saw more than 1,600 opioid-related deaths in 2021.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 1, 2022.

SLUGLINEAlta-Addictions-Homeless-Funding
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october, 2022

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