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The Truth about GMO’s

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Each week journalist John Stossel releases another video debunking widely held but incorrect beliefs.  Here’s a big one.

We’ve all seen the growing Organic sections in our local grocery stores.  It’s a free country and that’s perfectly fine.

However as you’ll see in this entertaining and informative short video, this is one subject that really gets John Stossel’s goat.  Stossel is not happy that millions of people feel they’re letting their families down because they can’t afford to buy organic.  He’s also more than miffed that activists are preventing some of the world’s poorest people from getting the food they desperately need.  Watch as Stossel goes toe to toe with the ‘political director’ of the Organic Consumers Association.

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From StosselTV

“Natural” food activists say: Stop eating genetically-modified foods!

They’re wrong. GMO foods are safe. They don’t, as claimed, “cause cancer.” Over the last couple decades, cancer is down and lifespans are up.

In this video I debate the issue with Alexis Baden-Mayer, political director of the Organic Consumers Association.

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To make sure you see the new weekly video from Stossel TV, sign up here: https://www.johnstossel.com/#subscribe

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John Stossel

Libertarian journalist John Stossel created Stossel TV to explain liberty and free markets to young people. Prior to Stossel TV he hosted a show on Fox Business and co-anchored ABC’s primetime newsmagazine show, 20/20. Stossel’s economic programs have been adapted into teaching kits by a non-profit organization, “Stossel in the Classroom.” High school teachers in American public schools now use the videos to help educate their students on economics and economic freedom. They are seen by more than 12 million students every year. Stossel has received 19 Emmy Awards and has been honored five times for excellence in consumer reporting by the National Press Club. Other honors include the George Polk Award for Outstanding Local Reporting and the George Foster Peabody Award.

 

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Health

Canada should delay MAID for people with mental disorders: psychiatrists

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Canada is not ready to expand medical assistance in dying for people with a mental disorder, leaving psychiatrists across the country “incredibly concerned” about patients needing better access to care, including for addiction services, says a group representing the specialists across the country.

The Association of Chairs of Psychiatry in Canada, which includes heads of psychiatry departments at all 17 medical schools, issued a statement Thursday calling for a delay to the change set to be implemented in mid-March.

Lack of public education on suicide prevention as well as an agreed-upon definition of irremediability, or at what point someone will not be able to recover, are also important, unresolved issues, the statement says.

“As a collective organization, we recognize that a lot of work is being done in Canada on this issue,” Dr. Valerie Taylor, who heads the group, said in the statement.

“Further time is required to increase awareness of this change and establish guidelines and standards to which clinicians, patients and the public can turn to for more education and information,” said Taylor, who is also chair of the psychiatry department at the University of Calgary.

A statement from the office of federal Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos says Canada is committed to implementing MAID for those with a mental disorder by keeping their safety and security at the forefront.

“We will continue to listen to the experts, including those at the front lines and those with lived experience, and collaborate with our provincial and territorial counterparts to ensure that a strong framework is in place to guide MAID assessors and providers before MAID becomes available to those for whom mental disorders is the sole underlying condition.”

The office did not say whether the implementation expected on March 17 would be delayed.

Dr. Jitender Sareen, head of the psychiatry department at the University of Manitoba, said many controversial issues were discussed at the group’s annual meeting in October regarding which patients with a mental disorder could be eligible for MAID, seven years after the practice was legalized in Canada for those with a physical ailment.

“If a person wants MAID solely for mental health conditions, we don’t have the clear standards around definitions of who’s eligible. How many assessments and what kinds of assessment would they actually need?” he said.

Sareen also called for training for health providers doing the assessments to begin sooner than its expected rollout next fall. Psychiatrists want clarity on what could be a request for suicide compared with MAID, leaving them to determine a path toward treatment or providing euthanasia, he added.

“There is still controversy around that between providers. Some people believe suicide is impulsive and self-destructive. But that’s not necessarily the case. People can have thoughts about suicide without a mental health condition, an active condition like depression or schizophrenia.”

Patients in rural communities may lack access to mental health care, and those struggling with addiction who have little to no access to harm-reduction services like supervised injection sites could also be left suffering until they try to seek MAID as a way out, said Sareen, who specializes in addiction services.

“We’re in the middle of an opioid epidemic. And we’re in the middle of a mental health pandemic. Post-COVID, wait times for access to treatment are the highest ever,” he said.

“As a group of department heads in the country who are responsible for medical education both for psychiatrists and residents, we’re saying, ‘Look, let’s put things aside as far as whether we agree with this law change or not.’ We’re just concerned we’re not ready for March.”

The federal parliamentary committee reviewing the law to expand MAID to those with a mental disorder issued an interim report in June and expected to publish a final report in October. However, it has been delayed until February.

The final report of an expert panel was released in May with 19 recommendations, including training for doctors and nurse practitioners assessing MAID requests to address topics like the impact of race, socioeconomic status and cultural sensitivity.

The report also said the expansion of MAID raises additional challenges involving those who are elderly, have neurodevelopmental or intellectual disabilities and people who are in prison, where the prevalence of mental disorders is high compared with the general population.

The panel relied on evidence from Belgium and the Netherlands, which it said have the most extensive set of safeguards, protocols and guidance overall.

Dr. Derryck Smith, a psychiatrist in Vancouver and a past board member of Dying With Dignity, said that while there is no doubt that MAID is a divisive topic among his peers across Canada, he believes there’s a need to wait for the special parliamentary committee’s final report “before we try to slow the process down.”

Smith said lack of access to care for mental health is no different than that for physical ailments so any delay in implementing the new law is a basis for discrimination.

“The health-care system is crumbling around us but that’s a different matter altogether,” he said. “What concerns me as well is what is so special about psychiatric illness? Why are we putting stigma around psychiatric illness?”

The Canadian Mental Health Association said it is focused on ensuring Canadians have access to universal mental health care with supports that are fully integrated into the public system and available for free.

“This includes recognizing the social determinants that are prerequisites for good mental health by providing housing and income and food supports that help keep people well, safe and out of poverty, and which create conditions that may mitigate requests for MAID,” it said in a statement.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 1, 2022.

This story was produced with financial assistance from the Canadian Medical Association.

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Alberta

Alberta premier defends new rules on in-person learning, no mask mandates in schools

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By Dean Bennett and Colette Derworiz

Alberta Premier Danielle Smith is defending new rules ordering schools to provide in-person learning during the current wave of viral illnesses, saying a clear, measured response is crucial for students and parents.

“We need a normal school environment for our children, and we need to make sure that the classrooms stay open to be able to support our parents,” Smith said at a news conference in Medicine Hat on Friday.

“That’s why we made the decision that we did — to give that clear direction.”

Her comments came a day after she announced regulatory changes saying school boards must provide in-person learning. Schools also can’t require students to wear masks in school or be forced to take classes online.

The changes take effect immediately.

“Anyone is welcome to wear a mask if they feel that that is the right choice for them, but we should not be forcing parents to mask their kids, and we shouldn’t be denying education to kids who turn up without a mask,” Smith said.

She has said mask rules and toggling from online to in-person learning adversely affected the mental health, development and education of students during the COVID-19 pandemic and strained parents scrambling to make child-care arrangements when schools shut down.

That’s over, Smith said.

“We’re just not going to normalize these kind of extreme measures every single respiratory virus season,” she said.

School boards have been asking for more direction as a slew of seasonal respiratory and gastrointestinal illnesses, along with some COVID-19 cases, have led to high classroom absentee rates and have jammed children’s hospitals.

In Edmonton, Trisha Estabrooks, board chair for Edmonton Public Schools, said the decision provided the clarity that the board was seeking.

“All Albertans now understand that it’s not within the jurisdiction, and nor should it ever have been within the jurisdiction of individual school boards, to make decisions that belong to health officials,” said Estabrooks.

She said the province has made it clear that any future public health order would supersede the new rules.

The in-person learning change applies to grades 1-12 in all school settings, including public, separate, francophone, public charter and independent schools.

The masking change applies to those same grades and schools, but also to early childhood services.

The Opposition NDP criticized the new rules, saying it’s unrealistic to force schools to be all things to all students while also handling a wave of viral illnesses and not providing additional supports to do it.

Jason Schilling, head of the Alberta Teachers’ Association, said the government needs to work with school boards to figure out how to make this work.

“You have schools that are struggling to staff the building, (they) can’t get substitute teachers, teachers are sick, they’re covering each other’s classes, principals are covering the classes,” Schilling said in an interview.

“And then to say if you go online, you are to still offer the same programming in person — we just don’t have the people to do that.”

Wing Li, communications director for public education advocacy organization, Support our Students, said it will be difficult for schools to offer hybrid learning without any additional resources.

“There are no teachers,” Li said in an interview. “Pivoting online was mostly due to staffing shortages, which is worse now three years in.”

Li said online learning is challenging for students but, when temporary and supported, can keep schools and communities safe from spreading illness.

“This is a quite aggressive use of the Education Act to enshrine an ideology,” she said.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Nov. 25, 2022

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