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Province steps in to break the cycle of child abuse in Central Alberta

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Supporting vulnerable children in central Alberta

Alberta taxpayers are spending $3.4 million to help build a new Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre (CACAC) in Red Deer to provide services to vulnerable children and youth.

CACAC will advocate for and provide services to children facing child abuse and mental health issues. Alberta’s government has approved a land lease between Red Deer Polytechnic and CACAC for about one acre, where a new facility will be located.

Quick facts

  • The total project cost for the new Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre is $22.4 million. This includes $19 million in donor funding and equity and $3.4 million from the Alberta government, which will be used to connect utility lines to service the land.
  • Alberta’s government approved the lease of land from the Red Deer Polytechnic under a 50-year lease agreement at $1 per year.
  • The Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre will construct and operate the new centre.

“Child abuse has no place in our province and Alberta’s government is committed to keeping vulnerable children safe.  Through this unique project, we will provide a mix of social and justice services to ensure we support victims, prosecute offenders and deliver critical mental health supports.”

Jason Kenney, Premier

This is the first successful project approved through the government’s unsolicited proposals framework. The framework provides a pathway for private sector organizations like CACAC to bring government investment ideas and/or innovative technologies. The goal is to provide public infrastructure, including social service facilities, highways, public transportation, health clinics, schools, housing, agriculture and irrigation systems.

“We are keen on supporting any viable project put forward by the private sector to help ensure Albertans get the infrastructure they need. The new Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre is a tremendous example of what can be achieved when we collaborate. Together, we can build communities, boost economies, support jobs and provide critical services to vulnerable Albertans.”

Prasad Panda, Minister of Infrastructure

“The new Child Advocacy Centre will provide a host of opportunities for post-secondary students in both child care and children services. Through work-integrated learning opportunities, we are providing employers with access to new talent while preparing for Alberta’s economic recovery and aligning educational outcomes with labour market needs.”

Demetrios Nicolaides, Minister of Advanced Education

“Together with Alberta’s government, we’re bringing to life a one-of-a-kind model in Canada. This funding announcement affirms that our government leaders are declaring that children who risk coming forward need all the help we can muster. They are acting so that victims of child abuse and those facing mental health issues find the very best supports at what could be their most vulnerable time.”

Mark Jones, chief executive officer, Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre

 

Alberta

Start-up of Trans Mountain expansion ‘going very well’ as global buyers ink deals for Canadian crude

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A worker at Trans Mountain’s Burnaby Terminal. Photo courtesy Trans Mountain Corporation

From the Canadian Energy Centre

By Deborah Jaremko

Chinese refiner pays about US$10 more for oil off TMX compared to sales value in Alberta

Canada’s oil sands producers are “back in the limelight” for investors following completion of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, according to a report by Enervus Intelligence Research.

For the first time in the better part of a decade, there is now breathing room on the system to ship all of the oil producers are able to sell off the coast of B.C.

Up until this May, Trans Mountain was regularly overbooked. Not anymore.

The crude carrier Dubai Angel picked up the first shipment from the long-awaited expansion on May 22, setting sail for China and a customer of oil sands producer Suncor Energy.

Analysts estimate Trans Mountain loaded 20 vessels in June, compared to a pre-expansion average of five per month.

“You’re seeing multiple buyers. It’s going very well,” said Phil Skolnick, managing director of research with New York-based Eight Capital.

“You’re seeing the exact buyers that we always thought were going to show up, the U.S. west coast refineries and as well as the Asian refineries, and there was a shipment that went to India as well.”

The “Golden Weld” in April 2024 marked the mechanical completion and end of construction for the Trans Mountain expansion project. Photo courtesy Trans Mountain Corporation

Canadian crude in demand on the global market

Asian markets – particularly China, where refineries can process “substantial quantities” of extra heavy crude and bitumen – are now “opened in earnest” to Canadian oil, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said in its June Oil 2024 report.

“There’s demand for this crude and people are going to make deals,” said Kevin Birn, chief analyst of Canadian oil markets with S&P Global.

The IEA said Canadian crude will increasingly compete with heavy oil from other countries, particularly those in Latin America and the Middle East.

June’s loading of 20 vessels is slightly lower than the 22 vessels Trans Mountain had targeted, but Skolnick said a few bumps in the project’s ramp-up are to be expected.

“About three months ago, the shippers were telling investors on their calls, don’t expect it to be a smooth ramp up, it’s going to be a bit bumpy, but I think they’re expecting by Q4 you should start seeing everyone at peak rates,” Skolnick said.

Delivering higher prices

Trans Mountain’s expanded Westridge Terminal at Burnaby, B.C. now has capacity to load 34 so-called “Aframax” vessels each month.

One of the first deals, with Chinese refiner Rongsheng Petrochemical, indicates the Trans Mountain expansion is delivering on one of its expected benefits – higher prices for Canadian oil.

Canada’s Parliamentary Budget Office has said that an increase of US$5 per barrel for Canadian heavy oil over one year would add $6 billion to Canada’s economy.

The June deal between Rongsheng and an unnamed oil sands shipper saw a shipment of Access Western Blend (AWB) purchased for approximately US$6 per barrel below the Brent global oil benchmark. That implies an AWB selling price of approximately US$75 per barrel, or about US$10 more than the price received for AWB in Alberta.

Expanded export capacity at the Trans Mountain Westridge Terminal. Photo courtesy Trans Mountain Corporation

More pipeline capacity needed

Oil sands production – currently about 3.4 million barrels per day – is projected to rise to 3.8 million barrels per day by the end of the decade before declining slightly to about 3.6 million barrels per day in 2035, according to the latest outlook by S&P Global.

“Despite the recent completion of the Trans Mountain Expansion project, additional capacity will still be needed, likely via expansion or optimization of the existing pipeline system,” wrote Birn and S&P senior research analyst Celina Hwang in May.

“By 2026, we forecast the need for further export capacity to ensure that the system remains balanced on pipeline economics.”

Uncertainty over the federal government’s proposed oil and gas emissions cap “adds hesitation” to companies considering large-scale production growth, wrote Birn and Hwang.

Global oil demand rising

World oil demand, which according to the IEA reached a record 103 million barrels per day in 2023, is projected to continue rising despite increased investment in renewable and alternative energy.

June outlook by the International Energy Forum (IEF) pegs 2030 oil demand at nearly 110 million barrels per day.

“More investment in new oil and gas supply is needed to meet growing demand and maintain energy market stability, which is the foundation of global economic and social well-being,” said IEF secretary Joseph McMonigle.

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Alberta

Jordan Peterson Interviews Alberta Premier Danielle Smith – Preview

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This is a clip from tomorrow’s podcast release with Premier Danielle Smith. In it, she and Dr. Peterson discuss Trudeau’s stance against fossil fuels and the unreliability of so-called “renewables.”

Dr. Peterson’s extensive catalog is available now on DailyWire+: https://bit.ly/3KrWbS8

ALL LINKS: https://linktr.ee/drjordanbpeterson

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