Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Community

Photo club focuses on Arctic images

Published

If you’ve ever imagined grabbing your camera and heading off to photograph remote parts of the northern hemisphere, the Northwest Passage, Iceland or the remote Islands off of the shores of Scotland, the central Alberta photo club has a presentation you need to see.
Adventure Canada will share their experience photographing in Canada’s north and its coastlines. The company hosts tours on smaller cruise ships bringing photographers to shore via zodiacs.

“The club brings in different speakers to please the variety of individual needs of its members,” says Scotty Roxburgh, the club’s president, adding, “and we like to stimulate each level of photographer to move outside of their individual comfort zone.”

“Adventure Canada provides a variety of experts on their cruises to educate individuals about the remote areas they visit, professional photographers along with historians, marine biologists, culturalists, archaeologist, authors, artists,” Roxburgh said. He thinks the cruise will interest more than just the club members, so tickets for the March 3 presentations at Golden Circle event will also be available to the public at the door or online at http://centralalbertaphotographicsociety.com .

Dr, Scott Forsyth, is an expert landscape photographer and he’ll share how he creates images, demonstrate setting up and photographing in remote areas, discuss composition, available light and post processing to achieve great images. The session runs from 2 until 5 pm Saturday returning at 7 pm with David Newland sharing his experiences of travelling the Northwest Passage through his Story and Song, a musical and spoken-word performance of original songs, along with photographs, inspired by the sights and sounds of the Canadian Arctic.

Roxburgh’s club, the Central Alberta Photographic Society, goes by its acronym nickname, CAPS, and is having a banner year, providing and organizing compelling presenters and interesting and rewarding outings. Membership includes beginners and experts and all levels in between, all enthusiastic about capturing images of great experiences. Think snowy owls. X-country ski championships. Beautiful Alberta landscapes. Ice bubbles at Lake Abraham.

As members get comfortable with their cameras, getting that great shot gets more compelling; the opportunities to take interesting photos keep expanding and they get together for some really enjoyable and instructive activity. Often outside, in fresh air.

Last month, more than a dozen members of the club covered the 2018 Haywood Noram/Peavy Mart Western Canadian Championships at Riverbend, taking thousands of images and providing organizers and athletes with a collection of more than 3,000 moments captured. Roxburgh says he’s pleased with how well the membership gels socially this year with good attendance and lots of enthusiastic participation.

Details of the Adventure Canada and Northwest Passage in Story, Song and Photograph are available at http://centralalbertaphotographicsociety.com

Alberta

Keep an eye out for the kids!

Published

on

This message is for all teachers and all adults in Alberta.  This is an unprecedented time when children in our province are asked to stay home.  That means they won’t be “seeing” their support systems in their schools and their community.  Please pay attention when you do see the children you encounter.  Some may need help.  Please keep your eyes open for vulnerable youth.

Message from Minister of Education Adriana LaGrange and Minister of Children’s Services Rebecca Schulz

“We are humbly asking for your help as we look to continue to protect those that need our help the most”

Thank you Minister of Education Adriana LaGrange and Minister of Children’s Services Rebecca Schulz for articulating the importance of watching out for our little ones, our vulnerable ones, during this time of crisis.

It takes a village to raise a child, and it takes a community to keep them safe.

If you suspect abuse or are in need of help, please reach out.

▪️Child Abuse Hotline (Local 24 Hrs): 1-800-638-0715
▪️Kids Help Phone: 1-800-668-6868
▪️Children’s Services: 403-340-5400
▪️RCMP Complaint Line: 403-343-5575

#RedDeerStrong – Adjusting to isolation? Now’s the time for new habits. Studio Pilates will help make fitness part of your new routine.

Alberta imposes more measures to deal with pandemic, says landlords can’t evict

Continue Reading

Community

Crime Prevention for Your Home During the COVID-19 Crisis

Published

on

March 27, 2020

More and more of us are working from home and practicing social distancing during this COVID-19 crisis. This means there are more “eyes on the street” in our neighbourhoods to notice and report suspicious activity. However, this could create some new challenges, such as increased “back alley” and vehicle activity. Here are some tips from the Central Alberta Crime Prevention Centre, in partnership with the RCMP, to improve your security at home during this time:

  • Remove all valuables (including coins, empty bottles, medications, bags, sunglasses, etc.)  from your vehicles and lock your doors every night. If you are leaving a vehicle parked on the street or garage pad, be sure to remove your garage door opener.
  • Store empty bags of bottles in your garage or a locked storage unit. Leaving them in plain view in your backyard or  back alley just encourages thieves to come on to your private property, and return to check if you have put more bags out.

    Tire Lock

    Hitch Lock

  • If you are storing an RV in your back yard, remove propane bottles and batteries, and don’t leave any other valuables in it, even “just overnight” because you are leaving in the morning.
  • If you are storing a trailer in your back yard, consider a lock hitch or tire lock.
  • Cut down bushes to 2′ or less, and trim tree canopies up to 6′ to increase sightlines into and from your property. Trim bushes away from doors and windows to remove hiding places for people who shouldn’t be there.
  • If leaving sliding doors or windows open for fresh air, leave them open them 6″ or less, and consider using inexpensive dowels inside the frame to ensure the window/door cannot be pushed open further from the outside.
  • Consider installing motion detector lights that you, or your neighbours, can see to alert you to suspicious activities.
  • If you are in your back yard, do NOT leave your overhead garage door open or your garage man door unlocked.
  • Implement the RCMP’s #9PMRoutine every night to reduce those “the one time I forgot” times and ensure your home is secured for the night.
  • If you own a business and it is currently closed, you may wish to check out our other article, “Crime Prevention for Your Business During the COVID-19 Crisis“.

Please continue to REPORT all suspicious activity to the RCMP non-emergency line at 403-343-5575. Should you want further information, please visit our website, call us at 403-986-9904, or email us at info@cacpc.ca.

Crime Prevention for Business During the COVID-19 Crisis

#RedDeerStrong – Small business wants to make a big difference to families with ‘isolated’ children

Continue Reading

march, 2020

sat28mar5:04 pm5:04 pmQuarantini Power Hour of Networking Event (Central Alberta)5:04 pm - 5:04 pm

Trending

X