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Lloydminster RCMP looking for suspect after weapons and drugs seizure

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From Lloydminster RCMP

Lloydminster RCMP: search warrant leads to multiple charges

Lloydminster RCMP General Investigative Service (GIS) with the assistance of the Lloydminster Crime Reduction Unit (LCRU) executed a search warrant on a residence in the 5600 block of 53 Avenue. Five long rifles and a restricted pistol with ammunition, several debit and fuel cards were retrieved. Numerous knives and swords were located. Multiple stolen cheques from local businesses were also recovered. In addition, 12 grams of a substance suspected to be fentanyl and 25 grams of a substance suspected to be cocaine were seized.

As a result of the search warrant Korey Douglas Long (34), Kimberly Dawn Mason (26), Shane Edward Riley (34), and Reena McCallum (38) all of Lloydminster were charged with multiple offences including:

  • Possession of a controlled substance
  • Possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose

In addition, Long was charged with:

  • Possession of a controlled substance
  • Possession of property obtained by crime
  • Failing to comply
  • Possession of a weapon for a dangerous purpose
  • Fraud under $5000
  • Forgery;

Long was recently arrested, and is currently being held for Lloydminster Provincial Court on March 3, 2020. McCallum and Mason were released after a hearing for Lloydminster Provincial Court on April 14, 2020.

Riley’s whereabouts are currently unknown, and he is currently wanted. Riley is considered armed and dangerous. If you know of his whereabouts, please contact the Lloydminster RCMP at 780-808-8400 or your local police. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477(TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Alberta

Alberta legislation would set up independent agency to investigate police complaints

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The Alberta government has introduced legislation aimed at making police forces more accountable and responsive to the communities they serve.

The Police Amendment Act introduced Thursday would establish an independent agency called the Police Review Commission to receive complaints, carry out investigations and conduct disciplinary hearings to do away with the idea of police investigating police.

Mike Ellis, the minister of public safety and emergency services, said the province has been consulting with Albertans since 2018 to come up with the first major overhaul of the Police Act in 34 years.

“One thing that came up consistently was the need to change how complaints against the police are investigated to end the system of police investigating police,” Ellis said.

“The legislation answers those long-lasting calls to reform the public complaints process by establishing an independent agency to handle complaints against police.”

The Alberta Serious Response Team will continue to handle all cases involving death or serious injuries, as well as serious and sensitive allegations involving all police services. Its mandate would be expanded to include peace officers employed by provincial organizations as well as community peace officers at the municipal level.

The legislation would also require all jurisdictions with a population above 15,000 currently policed by the RCMP to establish civilian bodies to oversee policing priorities.

The United Conservative Party government is deciding next steps following the release of a third-party analysis last year of a proposal to create a provincial police force instead of using the RCMP in rural areas and some smaller communities.

“No decisions have been made regarding the provincial police service,” Ellis said. “This is about ensuring that the rural municipalities have a say at the table under our current model which is the RCMP, who is the current provincial police service provider.”

Ellis said it could be another 18 months before the Police Review Commission is up and running. He said negotiations are underway with the RCMP to see how they would fit in under civilian oversight.

“Right now K-Division has expressed they’re supportive of this, however, we’re still having discussions with Public Safety Canada because it still falls technically under the RCMP in Ottawa,” he said.

“We’re going to continue to negotiate with the RCMP because we believe the independent body is the right approach and we can continue going down that path.”

The proposed changes would also require police to develop diversity and inclusion plans to reflect the diverse and distinct communities they serve and to better understand local community needs.

The Alberta Association of Chiefs of Police supports the changes.

“Changes to update our Police Act are long overdue,” said Calgary Police Chief Mark Neufeld, president of the association in a statement.

“We have advocated for several years that the act needs reform to bring it more in line with the realities of the modern police workplace,”

Edmonton Police Chief Dale McFee said the changes “will provide an additional layer of public transparency” that will benefit both the public and police.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2022.

— By Bill Graveland in Calgary

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Alberta

TC Energy shuts down Keystone pipeline system after leak in Nebraska

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CALGARY — TC Energy Corp. says it has shut down its Keystone pipeline after a leak in Nebraska.

The company says it has mobilized people and equipment in response to a confirmed release of oil into a creek, about 32 kilometres south of Steele City, Neb.

TC Energy says an emergency shutdown and response was initiated Wednesday night after a pressure drop in the system was detected.

It says the affected segment of the pipeline has been isolated and booms have been deployed to prevent the leaked oil from moving downstream.

The Keystone pipeline system stretches 4,324 kilometres and helps move Canadian and U.S. crude oil to markets around North America.

TC Energy says the system remains shutdown as its crews respond and work to contain and recover the oil.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2022.

Companies in this story: (TSX:TRP)

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