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I’m mourning the loss of “Community”

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Community
By Ilan Cooley

I find myself mourning the loss of community. It is nearly extinct, if not already dead. Growing up, I think we just took it for granted. As a farm kid, people came from miles around for brandings, weddings and funerals, and if something went wrong, at the very least someone would show up unannounced with a casserole.

I remember several years ago, my dad’s stubble field caught fire and a wicked west wind threatened to take it a hundred miles. It would have, if every neighbour within driving distance hadn’t come with a hoe, or shovel to stomp it out, as my dad heroically harrowed a perimeter to stop it in its tracks.

I recall a visiting family member being caught off guard as the rally cry came in around our house. All were roused and already loading vehicles as he called after us asking why we didn’t just call the fire department. When you are born into it, you understand the fire department is 30 minutes away and
you and your neighbours are the first line of defence. In smaller towns I suspect community still exists in ways it does not here in the lonely urban sprawl, but I think even there its heartbeat is weakening. Community used to spring up in churches and at dances, picnics and other such celebrations, but there is less of that now. Nothing would be thought of a neighbourhood pop-in. These days, the hatches are battened down tight, and it’s disheartening that doorbells often only ring when solicitors call.

I remember when I moved into my first new home. I was so excited to meet my neighbours that I baked Christmas cookies and took them door to door. I was met with confused stares and awkwardness. It didn’t take long before I no longer baked cookies, or bothered dropping off a baby gift for couples I barely knew. I know it is my decision to stop that has taken the sentiment of community away from me. I know I should try again. A lot of this reflection has been brought about because I recently saw a glimmer of hope. I witnessed the best example of community I have seen in a long while.

As a friend of mine battled cancer, people rallied around her in a miraculous way. She had lots of friends, and it seems she was a stakeholder in a large number of communities. There were her church friends, soccer team friends, running friends and family. They came to visit in her final weeks and days in droves, and I saw how it brightened her spirits. At her funeral there were stories of how one special lady had brought so much joy, light and life to the people she knew, and the groups she joined. It was there in that Baptist Church pew that I had a realization that community isn’t something that happens, it is something you create. On Friday, Doris would have turned 71. She was my own mum’s age, yet I considered her a friend because she treated me like I mattered. She made me feel important, and did so for many others, because she was a wonderful community builder.

On Sunday some of us will get together to run for the cure in her honour. She had survived breast cancer twice and also fought lung and brain cancer. We will come together as friends and will hopefully prove there is a pulse left in community. We wonder why people feel isolated these days, but we are all contributing to it. Let’s try harder and do better. We need each other.

(Published with permission)

Ilan Cooley is an Edmonton based entrepreneur and writer. She is a an avid world explorer, rescue dog mama and community builder.

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Click to experience 2021 Festival of Trees online!

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Red Deer Festival of Trees 2021 is dedicated to providing funding for critical operating room equipment. Having access to new and replacement equipment for the OR will improve the patient experience and reduce wait times for life-saving surgeries, allowing our friends and family to remain close to home during their procedures.

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REBELS ANNOUNCE ‘FESTIVAL WEEKEND’ IN SUPPORT OF 2021 FESTIVAL OF TREES

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News Release from The Red Deer Rebels

The Red Deer Rebels are proud to announce “Festival Weekend” on November 26 and 27, in support of the 2021 Festival of Trees!

Festival of Trees, hosted by the Red Deer Regional Health Foundation, will support critically needed equipment in the operating room at Red Deer Regional Hospital to help provide a higher level of service to Central Albertans.

Beginning Wednesday November 24 at 9 a.m., a five-day progressive 50/50 inclusive of both weekend Rebels home games, will support the 2021 Festival of Trees and RDRHF, Rebels Foundation for Education and Wellness, and the Rotary Club of Red Deer. Sales close at 9:30 p.m. on Sunday, November 28. Tickets can be purchased at Rebels5050.com.

Help support the 2021 Festival of Trees by using promo code “TREES21” to purchase your tickets via Tickets Alberta, for either the November 26 or 27 Rebels games. The Rebels will donate $7 from every adult ticket and $4 from every youth ticket back to the Festival of Trees. The promo code is available for online purchases only.

Fans can visit the Festival of Trees during the intermission of both weekend games and view all trees available for auction. Fans can also show their ticket for free entry to the Festival all weekend.

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