Connect with us

News

Heat Warnings, Fire Advisories & Child Pornography Charges

Published

5 minute read

2:44 pm – After nearly two years of collaboration, public consultation and review, the Lacombe Intermunicipal Development Plan (IDP) has been adopted by both councils. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

2:37 pm – Red Deer RCMP have one woman in custody and have recovered a stolen truck after an armed robbery at a convenience store shortly after 9 am this morning. Read More.

1:21 pm – Two Red Deer men are among 16 that were arrested between April 5th and June 1st of this year, facing a total of 56 child pornography related charges. Read More.

12:44 pm – Because of the hot, dry conditions, Lacombe County has issued a Fire Advisory. This means the County is asking that only necessary burning take place and that all conditions of valid burn permits are strictly adhered to. Campfires and burning barrels are currently allowed but may be restricted if conditions worsen. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

11:43 am – Westerner Park has been granted $245,000 as part of the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program and the organizaiton is in the process of completing the upgrades to the Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system in the Stockmens Pavilion.

11:15 am – This year’s city wide spring cleanup program, Green Deer, was a success with volunteers from businesses, community associations, schools, clubs, churches, families and individuals coming together to clean up garbage in our city. Read More.

11:09 am – Whether you drive, walk, cycle or take transit, we all travel in Red Deer, and on Monday City Council will debate a plan that sets the stage for the future of how citizens move in Red Deer. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

10:59 am – Ponoka RCMP are asking for the public’s help in locating a missing 25 year old man. Ryan Roman was last seen on July 4, 2017, at about 4:45 pm in the area of the Centennial Centre in Ponoka. He’s described as 5’8″ tall, 160 lbs, brown hair with shaved head, brown eyes and last seen wearing shorts and a black t-shirt. Read More.

10:34 am – The buzz is building around the Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre/Centre des Jeux du Canada Gary W. Harris at RDC. Find out the latest update on how construction is going at the impressive new facility!

10:25 am – Red Deer is one of four communities in the province where Law Enforcement officials arrested 16 men for alleged child pornography offences. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

10:07 am – It’s time to ride the Midway in Sylvan Lake! The Midway is in town from July 6th – 9th! Read More.

9:45 am – The Blackfalds Community Market is on today from 4 – 7 pm in the parking lot of the Multi-Plex. Read More.

9:20 am – Red Deer County is encouraging it’s residents to get to know each other through the Great Neighbours program. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

8:52 am – A Fire Advisory has now been issued for the Town of Rimbey and Ponoka County. Read More.

8:26 am – Red Deer RCMP continue to look for 15 year old Terrylle Rain, who was last seen in Red Deer on May 20th. Mounties say they would like to verify his well-being. Please contact Red Deer RCMP if you have information about his whereabouts.

8:12 am – Hot tunes and hot weather are planned for the Ross Street Patio today. Check it out from 11:30 – 1:00 pm. Read More.

For more local news, click here!

8:04 am – The Reining Alberta Summer Classic gets underway at Red Deer’s Westerner Park today. The event runs from July 6th – 9th inclusive. Read More.

7:49 am – Fire Advisories have been issued for many parts of Alberta’s west country, including the Town of Rocky Mountain House, the Rocky Mountain House Forest Area, Clearwater County, the Village of Caroline and the Summer Village of Burnstick Lake. Details Here.

7:38 am – Environment Canada meteorologists have issued a Heat Warning for the Red Deer, Innisfail, Ponoka and Stettler areas today. Other regions to the south and east are affected as well. Details Here.

For more local news, click here!

Follow Author

Crime

Victims’ families boycotting N.S. mass shooting inquiry over questioning of Mounties

Published on

TRURO, N.S. — The relatives of victims of the 2020 Nova Scotia mass shooting have told their lawyers to boycott the public inquiry investigating the tragedy, after its commissioners decided to prevent cross-examination of key Mountie witnesses.
The law firm representing 14 of 22 families issued a statement saying it was instructed not to attend the hearings on Wednesday and the next three hearings on the schedule. Patterson Law said the families are “disheartened and further traumatized” by the commission’s decision Monday to prevent the law firm’s lawyers from directly questioning Staff Sgt. Brian Rehill and Sgt. Andy O’Brien.

Rehill was the RCMP’s risk manager at its Operational Communications Centre in Truro, N.S., when the rampage that claimed 22 lives over two days began in nearby in Portapique, N.S., on April 18, 2020. When the centre received reports of an active shooter, Rehill assumed command while O’Brien assisted in overseeing the early response.

The federal-provincial commission of inquiry agreed Monday to provide special accommodations for three senior Mounties when they testify about command decisions they made as the tragedy unfolded.

Rehill and O’Brien will face questions from commission lawyers via Zoom calls that will be recorded and broadcast at a later date. Participants and lawyers who wish to observe their testimony must remain off screen with their microphones muted while each Mountie is speaking.

No reasons were given for the special arrangements. The commission has said this information is considered private because it deals with physical or psychological health needs.

Participating lawyers were told to submit questions for Rehill and O’Brien to commission lawyers in advance of the officers’ testimony, which is expected to take place on Monday and Tuesday, beginning with Rehill.

Sandra McCulloch and Rob Pineo, the lawyers for the majority of the families, left their seats at the inquiry unoccupied on Wednesday and held a news conference outside the public library in Truro. Pineo said it’s now unclear whether the family’s representatives will return to the process, adding that he will keep consulting with them.

“This was supposed to be the process that would get the families information and get their questions answered and that is simply not happening,” he said, recalling that they had to hold a public march in Truro and Halifax to pressure the federal and provincial governments to launch a public inquiry instead of the limited review that was originally planned.

Nick Beaton, whose pregnant wife, Kristen Beaton, was killed, said he’s now referring to the mass casualty commission as “a review,” adding that he believes the public inquiry has evolved into a “love triangle” between the commission, the RCMP and the government.

Lawyer Tara Miller said her clients have given her instructions not to attend this week and next week.

“In addition to being fundamentally offside, what this decision does is further erode the confidence of family members who are the most affected,” she said in an interview Wednesday.

“These are individuals who put children to bed alone at night. These are the individuals who celebrate Mother’s and Father’s Days with memories.”

Miller said it has been her clients’ position all along that participating lawyers should be allowed to engage in unfettered but appropriate cross-examination of witnesses.

“That is a fundamental tenet of any kind of a litigation proceeding, and that includes public inquiries,” Miller said.

Miller also said cross-examination of Rehill will be central to the inquiry’s purpose.

“This was the individual who had command of the entire first response,” she said. “The decisions that he made and why he made them, those are all questions that are highly relevant.”

Lawyers for the families of victims Gina Goulet, Lillian Campbell, Aaron Tuck, Jolene Oliver and Emily Tuck said in interviews that they will continue to participate next week despite the restrictions on questioning.

Meanwhile, Staff Sgt. Al Carroll — former district commander for Colchester County — is expected to testify Thursday via a live Zoom call. He will be provided with breaks during his appearance, the commission said Tuesday. He could face direct cross-examination.

The National Police Federation and the federal Department of Justice had requested that O’Brien and Rehill be allowed to provide their information by sworn affidavit and that Carroll testify in person with questions asked only by commission counsel.

Commission chairman Michael MacDonald closed the hearing on Wednesday by describing the absence of the families’ lawyers as “unfortunate.” However, he said earlier in the day he didn’t expect that the accommodations would prevent the gathering of “necessary information” from the Mounties.

Staff Sgt. Bruce Briers took the witness stand Wednesday. He was the risk manager who oversaw the RCMP dispatch in Truro during the second day of the rampage on April 19, 2020. On cross-examination, Briers broke down in tears over not having heard, after he came on shift at 7 a.m., that the killer’s replica police car had a distinctive, black push bar on the front.

He said he now realizes that two officers had mentioned the bar at different points in the morning, adding “I didn’t hear either time. I wish I had; this is one of those regrets.” The bar was also visible in a photo of the replica vehicle that was distributed among some senior officers at about 7:27 a.m.

He said he could have issued a broadcast on police radio about the push bar and it might have “made a big difference.”

“I have to live with that.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 25, 2022.

— With files from Michael MacDonald in Halifax.

Michael Tutton, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Judge decides ‘Freedom Convoy’ organizer Tamara Lich stays out on bail

Published on

OTTAWA — Tamara Lich, a key organizer of the “Freedom Convoy” protest that gridlocked Ottawa for weeks, will remain released on bail while awaiting trial, a judge ruled Wednesday.

Ontario Superior Court Justice Kevin Phillips said he made his decision because she has followed her bail conditions, her surety has supervised her well and she’s already had a “taste of jail,” which he said lowered her risk to reoffend.

The judge said he does not accept that Lich breached her release conditions by agreeing to receive an award, and added Lich can be trusted to respect the conditions of her release.

She was released in March with a long list of conditions, including a ban from all social media and an order not to “support anything related to the Freedom Convoy.”

The terms of Lich’s release were intended to prevent a similar protest from happening in the national capital, the judge said, adding the court does not seek to control people’s political views.

“The courts are not a thought police. We seek only to control conduct to the extent that certain behaviour will violate or likely lead to violation of the law,” he said.

The protest is over and has left Ottawa, he said, adding it would be “practically impossible” to mount a similar protest in the city again.

Lich’s lawyer, Lawrence Greenspon, said in an interview Wednesday that he was pleased with the decision.

“She’ll be able to conduct her life in a lot more normal fashion as a result of the judge’s ruling,” said Greenspon.

Moiz Karimjee, a Crown prosecutor, said last week that Lich violated one of her bail conditions by agreeing to accept an award for her leadership during the Ottawa protest, and should be sent back behind bars to wait for her trial.

Greenspon argued last week her bail conditions should be loosened to allow her to come to Ontario and use social media.

He told the court that the social media ban imposed on Lich was unnecessarily broad and has had a huge impact on her life while she’s been out of custody.

However, Phillips said Wednesday the ban on Lich’s access to social media is warranted.

“Social media can be a problematic feedback loop where people get egged on and caught up in group activity they would never perform on their own,” he said.

Social media “undoubtedly contributed to and even drove” Lich’s conduct related to the protest, and her separation from it is necessary to lower her risk of reoffending, said Phillips.

Noting that Lich is in her late 40s, Phillips said she should be able to remember “how to use the social skills she surely built up before the advent of the internet.”

Lich is able to communicate by many other means, including email, phone or meeting in person, he said.

Greenspon said while he would have liked to see the social media ban reversed, “the most important thing was the rejection of the Crown’s efforts to to put her back in jail for agreeing to accept an award.”

The judge did amend her release conditions to allow her to visit Ottawa.

Lich’s motivation for coming to the city cannot be disclosed because it is under a court-ordered publication ban.

Phillips reiterated the high unlikelihood that Lich could organize an event resembling the convoy protest.

While she’s permitted to come to Ottawa, Lich is not allowed to visit the downtown core so as not “to walk around the very neighbourhoods she is alleged to have traumatized,” he said, except to attend court or meet with legal counsel.

Lich and fellow protest organizer Chris Barber are jointly accused of mischief, obstructing police, counselling others to commit mischief and intimidation.

The “Freedom Convoy” protest evolved into a weeks-long demonstration that congested the streets of Ottawa in February.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 25, 2022.

———

This story was produced with the financial assistance of the Meta and Canadian Press News Fellowship.

Erika Ibrahim, The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Trending

X