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Edmonton City Council deactivates face coverings bylaw – Masks come off July 1!

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City Council deactivates Mandatory Masking Bylaw

Edmonton City Council has decided to deactivate the Temporary Mandatory Face Coverings bylaw 19408. The decision means Edmontonians will not be required to wear a face covering or mask in indoor public places as of July 1. Council’s decision approved a bylaw (19783) that amends the previously adopted temporary mask bylaw (19408). The decision puts Edmonton in alignment with Stage 3 of the province’s Open For Summer plan, which begins on July 1.
The temporary mandatory face covering bylaw will remain in place, but will not be effective unless public health conditions deteriorate and Alberta returns to an earlier stage of the relaunch plan, or the Chief Medical Officer of Health issues an order mandating the wearing of masks in Alberta.
The amending bylaw will come into effect at 12:01 a.m. on July 1, 2021. Until then, masks will be required in all indoor public spaces and public vehicles in the City of Edmonton.
“We know that Edmontonians have mixed feelings about the decision, with some eager for all restrictions to be lifted and others concerned that the reopening is happening too soon,“ said City Manager Andre Corbould. “We presented Council with several options for ending the City’s mask bylaw based on best available medical advice. The safety of Edmontonians is always our primary concern and we believe that this amending bylaw provides the right flexibility for responding to changing COVID-19 conditions.”
As part of the province’s Stage 3 reopening plan, it will still be mandatory for masks to be worn by Albertans when in public vehicles like buses, LRT, taxis and ride shares starting on July 1. This may provide some reassurance to those who want to manage their personal risk of transmission.
We acknowledge that some Edmontonians may be concerned about their safety in the coming weeks. We want to remind everyone in the community that voluntary mask wearing is a reasonable step that we should all respect.

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Alberta

Province demanded plan: Edmonton mayor outlines ways city will try to curb crime

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Edmonton Mayor Amarjeet Sohi highlighted provincial funding discrepancies between his city and Calgary to tackle homelessness as he outlined Thursday a plan to address rising crime in the downtown area.

“Currently, there are approximately 634 permanently funded emergency shelter spaces in Edmonton, compared to 1,758 spaces in Calgary,” Sohi said.

He added that Calgary also receives 40 to 50 per cent more in funding to support community efforts to end homelessness.

“I don’t understand the reason for this discrepancy when both cities are facing similar challenges,” he said.

“We’re asking the government of Alberta to immediately close this discrepancy and provide Edmonton the same level of support they provide to Calgary.”

Sohi’s comments come after the city published Thursday the final version of its safety plan for downtown, Chinatown and the transit system. The city abided by a deadline set two weeks ago by Justice Minister Tyler Shandro.

Shandro used his ministerial power to demand a report from the city on what is being done to get crime under control. In a letter to Sohi on May 26, Shandro also pointed to the recent killings of two men in Chinatown.

Sohi said he had been working on problems affecting the city’s core since he took office in October. He has said the areas of action that help address social disorder — mental health, drug addiction and homelessness — are mainly within the province’s jurisdiction.

“If (the province is) really and truly serious about safety and about the well-being of Edmontonians, then give us the same support that you give Calgary,” he said.

The plan combines immediate steps and longer-term initiatives.

In the short term, the city will put more police and peace officers on the street, fund private security to patrol Chinatown, implement programs to prevent and respond to drug overdoses, and increase responses to encampments and derelict homes.

There is also a plan to immediately set up an operations centre in Chinatown for police, peace officers and staff from social agencies. A location is yet to be determined.

Several initiatives call for cleaning streets and back alleys several times a day, adding more public washrooms in core neighbourhoods, and implementing a needle cleanup program.

Longer-term initiatives include decentralizing social services from core neighbourhoods and streetscape improvements.

Sohi also said the province should increase funding for Edmonton police to reflect population growth and inflation.

“In 2008, the province funded 105 police officers for our city, but capped the per capita cost to $100,000,” he said. “That funding has not been adjusted for inflation and, in 2022, the cost per officer has nearly doubled.”

Sohi added the city has made up that shortfall by increasing property taxes.

Shandro said in a statement Thursday that the plan has been submitted to his office and is being reviewed

“I am encouraged by the constructive discussions I’ve had with Mayor Sohi and the recent steps municipal officials have taken to improve public safety for Edmontonians — including city council’s vote to amend the municipal transit bylaw to ban loitering and drug use on public transit,” he said.

“There is still a considerable amount of work to do to address crime and violence in downtown Edmonton and make it safer for everyone, but these are positive steps in the right direction.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on June 9, 2022.

Daniela Germano, The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Alberta justice minister demands answers from Edmonton on crime

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By Dean Bennett in Edmonton

Alberta’s justice minister says people in Edmonton are not being kept safe from violent crime, particularly on public transit, and he’s ordering Mayor Amarjeet Sohi to provide answers.

Tyler Shandro has told Sohi he’s invoking his ministerial powers under the province’s Police Act to demand a report within two weeks on what the city will do to arrest a spike in serious crime.

In a letter to Sohi made public Thursday, Shandro cited an increase in downtown crime as well as in aggressive encounters and drug use on light-rail rapid transit.

He pointed to the killings last week of two men in the Chinatown district downtown.

“As the minister of justice and solicitor general, I have a responsibility under the Police Act to ensure the people of Edmonton receive adequate and effective policing,” Shandro said in the letter.

“It is quite apparent that residents feel uncomfortable and unsafe in the downtown core, riding transit and traversing the transit centre corridors.

“In short, the people of Edmonton deserve better than what this city council is delivering.”

Sohi called the letter an overreach by the provincial government, but added that he is glad the provincial government is finally paying attention.

“I share the same concerns about the safety in our downtown, Chinatown and on the LRT that he highlighted in this letter,” Sohi said Thursday. “The social issues that are causing these safety issues are nothing new.

“The disorder and crime that we are seeing in our downtown is directly linked to the lack of provincial investments in ending houselessness, the mental-health crisis, the drug poisoning and addictions crisis.”

Shandro’s letter said the United Conservative government is doing its part to address core issues that can lead to crime, including spending millions of dollars to fight drug addiction and homelessness.

Shandro did not make himself available to media to answer questions.

There was no comment from the Edmonton Police Service. Chief Dale McFee was to attend a city council meeting Friday.

Edmonton city councillors are currently debating whether to set this year’s police budget at $385 million, which would be a drop of $22 million if police could not secure extra funds from declining photo radar revenues.

Shandro said earlier this week he would be concerned if Edmonton’s police budget were to be cut.

The police budget has not been cut, said Sohi, who added that the city has invested more in transit officers, community action teams and in safety-related projects in affected areas.

“Council is investing in many issues that are the responsibility of the province and, frankly, they are falling short,” he said.

“The pandemic has brought to light so many social issues that are not being properly addressed or adequately funded.”

Sohi said he looks forward to meeting with the minister next week to outline his concerns and explain how the city is doing its part.

Irfan Sabir, justice critic for the Opposition NDP, said violent crime in Alberta’s capital is a serious issue that needs to be addressed. But, he added, the UCP government is choosing to off-load complex problems and pick fights instead of collaborating.

“People in Edmonton want a plan in place (so) they can be assured that they are safe in their homes and their communities. But in this instance, the minister is just passing the buck,” said Sabir.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published May 26, 2022.

— with files from Colette Derworiz in Calgary

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