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Alberta Sports Hall of Fame “Halftime Report”

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Artistic swimming is one of only three sports that are contested only by women at the Olympic Games; followed by rhythmic gymnastics and softball.

The unified movement in time to music is the defining aspect of artistic swimming, in which athletes can participate as a duet or team, in either a technical or free routine.

Greg Korbutt, son of Alberta Sports Hall of Fame visionary Orest Korbutt, was also by on July 9 to tour the Hall for the first time. Thanks for visiting, Greg!
This newsletter is sponsored by the 106.7 Rewind Radio.

Honoured Member in Focus: Leslie Sproule

Leslie Sproule has enthusiastically devoted herself to all levels of synchronized swimming since 1966 as an athlete, coach, administrator, and board member.

Her career includes 14 years as the Head Coach of the Edmonton Auroras, 14 years as a National Team coach for Synchro Canada including two years as the High-Performance Development Coach and two years as the High-Performance Director.

She has coached many of her teams to success on the International stage at two Olympic Games, numerous World Championships, Pan American, Commonwealth Games, World Cups, Nationals, and Canada Games.

Leslie’s coaching philosophy includes developing a complete athlete in a holistic, positive training environment, and developing life skills through sports and coaching to win.

Provincial Sport Organiezation: Alberta Artistic Swimming

Alberta Artistic Swimming (AAS) believes that everyone in the sport has the right to enjoy the sport at whatever level or position they participate.

AAS will lead and develop people in the sport of artistic swimming in Alberta and strives to have an increased number of people – athletes, coaches and officials involved in the sport.

Alberta Artistic Swimming values integrity, collaboration, excellence, and innovation to achieve success and continually work towards Advocating for the sport of artistic swimming and sport in general to increase awareness.

Tickets now available for Alberta Sports Hall of Fame Induction Banquet

The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame is pleased to officially announce the new date and location for the rescheduled 2020 Induction Banquet.

The Banquet, which had been postponed from its original date in May 2020, will now take place on Friday, October 22nd, 2021 at the Red Deer College (RDC) Arts Centre.

The timetable for the event is as follows:

  • 5:30 – 6:30 pm: Cocktail Reception
  • 5:30 – 6:30 pm: Silent Auction and Raffles
  • 6:45 – 8:30 pm: Awards and Presentations
  • 8:30 – 8:45 pm: Closing Remarks
  • 8:45 – 9:30 pm: Dessert/Nightcap in RDC Arts Centre Lobby

The Class of 2020 includes athletes Deidra Dionne, Chris Phillips, Kelly Sutherland, and Michael Robertson; builders Jan Ullmark, Terry Morris, Ken Babey, and Derek Douglas; Bell Memorial Award winners Nancy Southern and Ian Allison; Achievement Award winner John Currie; Pioneer Award winner Stan Wakelyn; and Legacy Award winner Dennis Kadatz.

Tickets are $50 for Alberta Sports Hall of Fame Honoured Members and their guests, or $75 for general admission.

For tickets, email [email protected], call (403) 341-8614, or visit www.albertasportshall.ca/events/2020-induction-banquet to download the ticket order form.

Are you ready to take your dates to a whole, new level?

Our new Date Night Out Monthly Charity Auction officially gets underway tomorrow.

Head to https://trellis.org/monthly-date-night-auction for this month’s auction item, and check back regularly for new, exciting date options.

Golfers wanted!

We’re looking for sponsors and golfers for the Annual Alberta Sports Hall of Fame Golf Tournament, which tees off on Tuesday, September 14 at the Innisfail Golf Course. This season, we will be partnering with the Innisfail Eagles Hockey Team.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to support the preservation of Alberta sports by playing at one of the province’s crown jewels.

Call (403) 341-8614 or email [email protected]ca for more information.

Leave a legacy

The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame needs your support to continue the ongoing preservation of Alberta’s sports history and the development of museum exhibits. We are grateful and appreciative of the generosity of our supporters and friends. We would be happy to assist you in choosing how your personal legacy will be fulfilled and the many options available. Here is some information on donating shares to ASHFM and the benefits to you as a donor.

Donate
Copyright © 2021 The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is:
Alberta Sports Hall of Fame
#102 – 4200 Highway 2
Red Deer, AB T4N 1E3
(403) 341- 8614
[email protected]

The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame provides a family-friendly, interactive experience. You will be surprised by what you discover inside! Have fun, laugh, play and discover Alberta sports heroes together. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame is an interactive, hands-on celebration of Alberta's sporting history. Our over 7,000 square feet of exhibit space includes a multisport area with virtual baseball, basketball, football, hockey, and soccer; an adaptive sports area, including a 200 meter wheelchair challenge; a Treadwall climbing wall; the Orest Korbutt Theatre; the Hall of Fame Gallery; an art gallery displaying works by provincial artists, and much more. Our venue boasts a collection of over 17,000 artefacts of Alberta sports history and showcases many of these items in a number of displays. The Alberta Sports Hall of Fame also offers an education program, group activities, and a unique environment to rent for your birthday party, special event, corporate reception or meetings.

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Alberta

Alberta legislation would set up independent agency to investigate police complaints

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The Alberta government has introduced legislation aimed at making police forces more accountable and responsive to the communities they serve.

The Police Amendment Act introduced Thursday would establish an independent agency called the Police Review Commission to receive complaints, carry out investigations and conduct disciplinary hearings to do away with the idea of police investigating police.

Mike Ellis, the minister of public safety and emergency services, said the province has been consulting with Albertans since 2018 to come up with the first major overhaul of the Police Act in 34 years.

“One thing that came up consistently was the need to change how complaints against the police are investigated to end the system of police investigating police,” Ellis said.

“The legislation answers those long-lasting calls to reform the public complaints process by establishing an independent agency to handle complaints against police.”

The Alberta Serious Response Team will continue to handle all cases involving death or serious injuries, as well as serious and sensitive allegations involving all police services. Its mandate would be expanded to include peace officers employed by provincial organizations as well as community peace officers at the municipal level.

The legislation would also require all jurisdictions with a population above 15,000 currently policed by the RCMP to establish civilian bodies to oversee policing priorities.

The United Conservative Party government is deciding next steps following the release of a third-party analysis last year of a proposal to create a provincial police force instead of using the RCMP in rural areas and some smaller communities.

“No decisions have been made regarding the provincial police service,” Ellis said. “This is about ensuring that the rural municipalities have a say at the table under our current model which is the RCMP, who is the current provincial police service provider.”

Ellis said it could be another 18 months before the Police Review Commission is up and running. He said negotiations are underway with the RCMP to see how they would fit in under civilian oversight.

“Right now K-Division has expressed they’re supportive of this, however, we’re still having discussions with Public Safety Canada because it still falls technically under the RCMP in Ottawa,” he said.

“We’re going to continue to negotiate with the RCMP because we believe the independent body is the right approach and we can continue going down that path.”

The proposed changes would also require police to develop diversity and inclusion plans to reflect the diverse and distinct communities they serve and to better understand local community needs.

The Alberta Association of Chiefs of Police supports the changes.

“Changes to update our Police Act are long overdue,” said Calgary Police Chief Mark Neufeld, president of the association in a statement.

“We have advocated for several years that the act needs reform to bring it more in line with the realities of the modern police workplace,”

Edmonton Police Chief Dale McFee said the changes “will provide an additional layer of public transparency” that will benefit both the public and police.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2022.

— By Bill Graveland in Calgary

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Alberta

TC Energy shuts down Keystone pipeline system after leak in Nebraska

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CALGARY — TC Energy Corp. says it has shut down its Keystone pipeline after a leak in Nebraska.

The company says it has mobilized people and equipment in response to a confirmed release of oil into a creek, about 32 kilometres south of Steele City, Neb.

TC Energy says an emergency shutdown and response was initiated Wednesday night after a pressure drop in the system was detected.

It says the affected segment of the pipeline has been isolated and booms have been deployed to prevent the leaked oil from moving downstream.

The Keystone pipeline system stretches 4,324 kilometres and helps move Canadian and U.S. crude oil to markets around North America.

TC Energy says the system remains shutdown as its crews respond and work to contain and recover the oil.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 8, 2022.

Companies in this story: (TSX:TRP)

The Canadian Press

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