Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"] [the_ad id="89560"]

Local Sports

Stettler Rugby Star is Female Athlete of the Month

Published

on

If you like this, share it!

The Alberta Sport Development Centre – Central (ASDC-C) is pleased to announce the ASDC-Central Female Athlete of the Month for May 2018 is Emily Brown.  

Emily Brown is an 17 year old, grade 12 student at William E. Hay Secondary School in Stettler.  The Big Valley, AB resident is a competitive Rugby athlete.

Before she discovered rugby, Emily was a multi-sport athlete (all school sports plus hockey and fastball).  In Grade 11, Emily led the WE Hay Wildcats to a Provincial Championship in Basketball.  In the spring of Grade 11 Emily started her Rugby journey with the Stettler Wildcats.  It was love at first sight!  While just starting out as a player, Emily has committed herself to developing the sport in the Stettler area by helping to deliver school and community clinics.  Emily joined the Titans Rugby Club in Red Deer last summer and was part of the Titans incredible run of success. 

2018 started on an incredible note as Emily was selected to Captain the Red Deer/Central Alberta Rugby 7’s team.  They captured their first tournament championship the same month.

This spring, Emily was chosen to represent Alberta as part of Rugby Alberta’s 7’s team that competed at Rugby Canada’s 7’s Nationals in Vancouver.  They brought home the Silver medal.  Emily will continue to compete for Titans and Alberta during the coming summer.

An excellent student/athlete, Emily excels on the pitch and in the classroom where she is an Honors student. Emily will attend the University of Alberta this fall.  She’ll major in Kinesiology and will try to crack the Pandas Rugby roster.

Emily’s strong work ethic, her undeniable athletic abilities and her training experiences with ASDC-Central will ensure that Emily continues to grow, develop and succeed in her Rugby career!  

ASDC-Central thanks Tom Bast Sports for celebrating the ASDC-Central Athlete of the Month recipients by the provision of commemorative apparel for each recipient.

For further information regarding this athlete, the ASDC-Central and our programs, please contact Miles Kydd @ miles.kydd@rdc.ab.ca  or 403-342-3231.


If you like this, share it!

The main purpose of the ASDC network is to coordinate and enhance services available to Alberta's emerging athletes and coaches. These regional centres provide services to athletes and coaches residing in rural and urban areas allowing athletes to develop and train at a high level without leaving home.

Alberta

Battle of Alberta raises over $500,000.00 for Child Advocacy Centre

Published

on

If you like this, share it!

Organizers of The Battle of Alberta are thrilled with the results of an incredible fund raising effort drawing together fans and players of Alberta’s two NHL clubs for a festival of fund raising and fun.

Alumni and Current Players of the Calgary Flames and Edmonton Oilers travelled from across North America to the Red Deer Golf and Country Club for the inaugural “Battle of Alberta”.

The Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre has expressed gratefulness to the Calgary Flames and Edmonton Oilers organizations for their support.  They also thank the team of volunteers who made every aspect of the fundraiser possible.  Finally and most importantly, hats off to all the sponsors who gave the better part of two days of their time and made massive financial commitments as well.

Here’s event co-chair Al Sim from a press release at the outset of the tournament:

Mark Jones, Chief Executive Officer of the CACAC, together with the centre’s staff and service partners, couldn’t be more pleased with this inaugural event. “Supporters of the centre have worked tirelessly since the formation of the coalition group who were determined to help with the desperate need for child advocacy in Central Alberta. We are collectively changing the way Central Alberta responds to child abuse. The Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre is a not for profit organization, governed by a board of directors that works in an integrative partnership with the Central Region Child and Family Services, Alberta Health Services, Alberta Justice, Alberta Education, the Central Alberta Sexual Assault Support Centre, and the RCMP to better service children, youth and families impacted by sexual abuse and the most serious/complex cases of physical abuse and neglect”.

The centre has professionals onsite dealing with the criminal aspects of the case, as well as child protection, medical and psychological needs of child victims and their families. Onsite professionals include police officers, physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and crown prosecutors with the common goals of: improved timeliness in the coordinated assessment and investigation of child abuse cases; increased access to support and therapeutic resources for the child and their family; enhanced collaboration among partners; more efficient and effective use of resources; increased knowledge and awareness of child abuse in the community.

Working collaboratively, we achieve greater results than any partner could on their own. It blends investigation, treatment, prevention, education and research with expertise to provide an integrated practice approach: wrapping around children and always “working in the best interests of the child”.


If you like this, share it!
Continue Reading

Local Sports

‘The Games We Play’ Feature Exhibit

Published

on

If you like this, share it!

The Games We Play
Written By Breanna Suk, Collections and Exhibit Coordinator, Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum
In February, we launched our new feature exhibit “The Games We Play,” which is filled with traditional table top games, some indigenous hand games, and several video game consoles.
The feedback we received from friends, volunteers, and guests has been overwhelmingly positive, however, we are often asked, ‘How do games, especially video games, tie into sports?’ I love this question because it allows me to share why this exhibit means so much to me and why I was so excited to do the research, write the storyline, and watch the whole exhibit come together.
I grew up in a house where we played family games more than sports, so these were my very first introductions to sports. I vividly remember sitting on the floor playing crokinole with my grandpa while he visited from Ontario. I remember the strange phantom pain I felt in my fingertips when the game piece hit the pegs, even though my fingers were nowhere near the board. Later, while watching the Ferby Four curl on TV with my dad, I made the connection between the sport of curling and the crokinole game.
I have similar memories of video games. I can remember being 5 or 6 and watching my brother play NHL ‘95. He took the time to explain to me who all the different players and teams were and his choices. It is the first real memory I have that is attached to hockey, which is now one of my favourite sports to watch and follow. These childhood memories give a broader appreciation for how these games allow us, as children and fans, to interact with the teams and players we love. Now married, I spend many nights curled up with my husband as he plays NHL ‘18 and MLB Showtime.
When I started planning this exhibit, I was very nervous. While I love creating exhibits highlighting technology and equipment evolution, I was even more excited to make something that would prompt my generation and younger to remember their first sports video games. While “The Games We Play” might not be what you expect in a sports museum, this exhibit will show exactly how games and sports belong together.


If you like this, share it!
Continue Reading

Trending

X