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Red Deer Catholic Regional Schools – Board Meeting Highlights

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From Red Deer Catholic Regional Schools

Inspired by Christ. Aspiring to Excellence.

Board of Trustees
Murray Hollman – Chair, Dorraine Lonsdale – Vice Chair, Sharla Heistad,  Monique LaGrange, Cynthia Leyson, Kim Pasula, and Anne Marie Watson

Administrative Procedure 458 – Duty to Report:

The Secretary Treasurer presented the Administrative Procedure 458 – Duty to Report to the Board of Trustees, and highlighted that this procedure was communicated to all staff within the Division. For more information regarding Administrative Procedure 458 – Duty to Report, please click here.

Superintendent Report:

The Superintendent presented the report to the Board of Trustees, emphasizing the first Faith Formation evening for new probationary contract teachers. This gathering, which included administrators and Faith Coaches, senior administration, and trustees, gathered together for Mass held at St. Mary’s Parish on September 19th. The invitation for this Mass was extended to all Division staff via the Superintendent’s Weekly Update and school emails.

The Associate Superintendent of Curriculum shared that RDCRS is taking a measured, teacher-centered approach to curriculum implementation, emphasizing collective leadership and, acknowledging that implementation
is a gradual process similar to learning accommodating various paces and approaches. School administration teams held spring meetings to plan and establish support systems, while the Division has launched a website for
curriculum resources and encouraged schools to prioritize professional learning for this implementation.

This September, students across our Division are also learning from the finalized curriculum in:

• Kindergarten – Grade 3 French Immersion, Language Arts and Literature
• Kindergarten – Grade 3 Science
• Grades 4 – 6 English Language Arts and Literature
• Grades 4 – 6 Mathematics

The Division has also received $227,745.00 for resource allocation and $223,600.00 for professional learning and collaboration for the new curriculum implementation from Alberta Education.

In addition, the Superintendent and the Associate Superintendent of Curriculum met with Red Deer Polytechnic (RDP) President and Vice President, Academic & Student Experience at the Confluence Campus in Rocky Mountain House. The meeting aimed to introduce the new RDP leadership to the facility, assess community needs, and discuss future partnerships, particularly focusing on dual-credit programs and work-integrated learning opportunities for students within the school division. For more information regarding the Superintendent Report, please click here.

Joint Meeting with The City of Red Deer:

The Superintendent informed the Board about upcoming stakeholder engagement meetings and acknowledged the Board’s request for more time for discussions with City of Red Deer Councillors. The Superintendent welcomed suggestions from the Board, and a variety of potential topics were discussed including future land availability for Catholic schools, improved accessibility to recreational facilities, youth and training programs, more frequent review of City transit contracts, safety concerns at the Collicutt Centre, and the potential for recreation facilities to support structured programming. The Board of Trustees is also interested in a GH Dawe Community Centre presentation and how the facility could be utilized by Division schools.

Secretary Treasurer Report:

The Secretary Treasurer provided the Board of Trustees with an update on the St. Lorenzo Ruiz Middle School Capital Project, highlighting the Division’s ongoing efforts to finalize both the school construction and its financial aspects. Additionally, emphasis was placed on the Division’s anticipation and enthusiasm for the upcoming grand opening event of St. Lorenzo Ruiz. For more information about the Secretary Treasurer Report, please click here.

School Bus Advanced Funding:

The Secretary Treasurer shared with the Board of Trustees that on September 8th, RDCRS received notification from Christine Sewell, Assistant Deputy Minister Financial Services and Capital Planning, regarding new funding for school boards managing their transportation fleets. Due to transportation guideline changes for 2023-2024, RDCRS will require 10-15 additional buses. The Division is currently in the process of determining the exact number of buses required before applying for the School Bus Advanced Funding Program. For more information, please click here.

The next Board Meeting will take place on Friday, October 27, 2023 at 1:30 p.m.

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COVID-19

Learning loss piles up alongside snow while ‘e-learning’ collects dust

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From the Fraser Institute

By Alex Whalen and Paige MacPherson

During COVID school closures, students in the province missed at least 125 days of school between March 2020 and February 2022, more than any other province (except Ontario), generating a significant learning loss from which students have not caught up.

In a world increasingly connected by technology, and given the Nova Scotia government recently spent tens of millions of dollars enabling at-home learning, one might think that students would seamlessly shift to online learning during the recent snowstorms to avoid losing crucial instructional time. Unfortunately, that’s not happening.

During COVID school closures, the Nova Scotia and federal governments spent at least $31.5 million dollars on “virtual school” and other technological upgrades so students could, according to the provincial government, “succeed, even in an at-home learning environment.”

Unfortunately, the electronic learning infrastructure—which includes Chromebooks, laptops and iPads for students and teachers, and additional support and new teachers for Nova Scotia Virtual School—is collecting dust in a corner while Nova Scotia kids are falling further behind.

This isn’t some blip in an otherwise strong record of instructional time for Nova Scotia students. During COVID school closures, students in the province missed at least 125 days of school between March 2020 and February 2022, more than any other province (except Ontario), generating a significant learning loss from which students have not caught up.

Indeed, according to the latest results (2022) from the Programme for International Assessment (PISA), the gold standard of testing worldwide, Nova Scotia 15-year-olds trail the Canadian average in reading by 18 points and trail the Canadian average in math by 27 points. For context, PISA characterizes a 20-point drop as one year of lost learning.

Moreover, between 2003 and 2022, Nova Scotia student performance in reading dropped by 24 points—more than one year of learning loss—and dropped by 45 points in math. In other words, in math, 15-year-old Nova Scotia students today are more than two years behind where Nova Scotia 15-year-olds were in 2003.

These troubling trends underscore the need to put the existing e-learning infrastructure to work. During a recent two-week period, students in the Cape Breton-Victoria Regional Centre for Education school district missed seven days of school due to snow. And some students missed an additional five days due to weather and power outages. That’s nearly three weeks. While more instructional time is not a silver bullet for student success—and with power outages, e-learning is not a perfect solution—it could still make a big difference.

According to international research, missed classroom time causes learning loss and impacts children for life, reducing their life-long earnings. Nova Scotia education researcher Paul Bennett found that lost classroom time due to inclement weather compounds absenteeism and sets back student achievement and social progress.

The Houston government should ensure that Nova Scotian students have access to teacher-directed e-learning when schools are closed and, like other jurisdictions in Canada and the United States, abandon the practise of simply cancelling school due to inclement weather. It’s simply common sense. The snow may pile up, but there’s no good reason why learning loss must pile up with it. Parents are right to demand access to the e-learning they’ve already paid for through their tax dollars.

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Education

Bad student visa policy is no solution for bad student visa policy

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From the MacDonald Laurier Institute

By Ken Coates

Making matters worse, a Statistics Canada report released in November of 2023 found that the number of postsecondary students actually enrolled at Canadian Universities was 20% to 30% smaller than the total number of individuals with international student visa’s.

Post-secondary education is in turmoil, thrust into the headlines by the Government of Canada’s decision to cut back on international student visas and work permits. The near panicked response by colleges and universities across the county has attracted attention. The federal decision is poor public policy, with flawed timing, significant negative impacts, and potentially serious long-term implications. But the ‘solutions’ implemented in January 2024 are a classic example of using bad policy to address bad policy.  The fallout from this mélange of policy decisions could severely damage Canadian post-secondary institutions and the Canadian economy.

Governments, colleges, and universities have come to rely on international students, now numbering close to 1 million in Canada, particularly their tuition fees and the money that they bring into the country. The tuition fee revenues freed governments from the obligation to provide adequate funding to post-secondary institutions. Colleges and universities, for their part, used international student funding to avoid difficult, painful decisions related to the level of provincial support (the territories are not strongly affected by these processes).

The current controversy reflects more than a decade of poor and ineffective federal policies. Canada opened the gates for immigration, reaching unprecedented levels of refugees, formal immigrants, and hundreds of thousands of international students. Making matters worse, a Statistics Canada report released in November of 2023 found that the number of postsecondary students actually enrolled at Canadian Universities was 20% to 30% smaller than the total number of individuals with international student visa’s. Pointing to significant abuse of the study permit system, the report states, “It is unclear whether [the international ‘students’] stayed in Canada and, if so, what their main activities were.”

Our rapidly rising population is now blamed, not always accurately, for a serious national housing shortage and sky-rocketing prices, particularly in the major cities. The international student debate highlights the shocking shortcomings of the nation’s approach to housing and the absence of a thoughtful plan for population growth and rapid urbanization.

Bad federal policy is more than matched by poor provincial decisions, particularly in Ontario.  The Liberal and Progressive Conservative administrations in Ontario have underfunded colleges and universities, dramatically so, relative to the other provinces and territories.  Frozen tuition fees only added to institutional fiscal challenges. Several provinces, again led by Ontario, doubled down by authorizing many for-profit private colleges, most operating in league with public universities and colleges, to recruit international students. At the provincial level, the influx of international students, coupled with high tuition fees, masked the deficiencies of provincial funding, leaving underlying financial challenges unaddressed.

Colleges and universities had bad policies of their own.  Without the government funding to meet their salary, administrative and capital costs, post-secondary institutions became addicted to international student fees, the crack cocaine of advanced education.  Dozens of colleges and universities, enrolled thousands of international students, feeding the bottom line but increasing the reliance on international students and high tuition fees.  They assumed, over-optimistically, that the steady flow of international students would never slow, let alone stop. They are now paying the price for that miscalculation.

Some institutions, particularly small institutions in northern and small-town locations, eve established satellite facilities in big cities to capitalize on strong student demand and to supplement small and stagnant enrollments on the home campus. International students and satellite operations were lifelines for institutions that would otherwise be in severe difficulty.

The Government of Canada’s response to the convergence of multiple bad policy streams consists of additional bad policy decisions. International student visas have been slashed by 35% and student-friendly work permit arrangements have been cut back dramatically. Canada’s once wide-open doors for international students have been partially closed.  A carefully cultivated reputation for being receptive to foreign students has been degraded, if not dismantled, in one quick federal move.

The federal policy, announced with seemingly little coordination with provincial authorities and institutions, is a plainly political move, an urgent step taken by a Liberal government reeling in the polls. The decision was released in January 2024, at a key stage in the international student cycle. Colleges, public and private, are vulnerable to dramatic shifts in enrollment and they now face catastrophic losses of income. The implications go much further.  Residences will want for students and employers of the eager international students will struggle to find replacements.  Many college and university faculty and staff, particularly vulnerable short-term and sessional workers, will likely lose their jobs. And the national economy will lose out on a big portion of the billions of dollars spent annually by the international students.

The problem has been years in the making. The government may have been trying to make up for lost time but the hasty federal decision has already had an impact. Colleges and universities are already reporting sharp drops in applications. The message that Canada is no longer friendly for international students is out globally. The damage to student enrollment might be greater than anticipated.

A more appropriate approach would have been to announce a gradual reduction, starting in 2025, giving the colleges and universities time to adjust to a potential fiscal disaster. Another sensible alternative could have been to take aim at the abuse of the student visa system and to ensure those who entered the country under a study permit were actually enrolled in and attending classes. Bad policy often comes from knee-jerk reactions to political processes; good policy takes careful thought and, often, time.

Canada’s large international student recruitment industry brought billions of dollars into the Canadian economy.  Thousands of students worked while they studied and made successful transitions to permanent resident status.  Many people who came to Canada as high fee-paying students have become Canadian citizens and taxpayers.  The students followed the rules, as did the colleges and universities that capitalized on clear and long-standing government policy. The federal and provincial policies may have been poorly designed and inappropriate, but governments set the parameters and expectations and shouldn’t punish others for their shortsightedness.

Bad policy, to be succinct, is no solution for bad policy, but that is what is happening to international student education in Canada.

Ken Coates is a distinguished fellow and director of Indigenous affairs at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute and a professor of Indigenous governance at Yukon University.

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