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Red Deer Arts Council’s fifth Open Studio Tour takes public behind closed doors in this two-day event!

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The Red Deer Arts Council is thrilled to announce its fifth Open Studio Tour, taking place September 18th and 19th, 2021! This is a self-guided tour of artist studio spaces and free to the public.

Seven visual artists in five studios bring you this amazing experience. They will open the doors to their private art studios from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm and welcome the public to see the process of creating fine art as each artist demonstrates their process. Fascinating techniques and works of some of Red Deer and area’s most recognized artists will be on display for visitors.

This self-guided tour is free of charge. The artists will demonstrate the processes they use, and happily take questions about their media, style, technique, or anything related to art. Artists love to answer questions about their art!

Please Note: some artists are open both days, others open either Saturday or Sunday only. Please check each listing to see which artists are participating on that date or any additional hours they may host.

Download the complete list of artists and addresses HERE.

OPEN STUDIO TOUR LIST OF ARTISTS 2021

Saturday, September 18th Only – 10am to 4pm

Margaret R. Hall
Happy Yak Felt and Maggie’s Millinery
48 Good Crescent, Red Deer, AB
[email protected]
403-346-8289

Margaret Hall is a fibre artist and enjoys fabricating whimsical functional items. Working mostly with wool, she enjoys exploring the sculptural properties of wool and combining hand felting and traditional millinery techniques to make unique hats.

Demo: Margaret will demonstrate the difference between blocking a hat with a hand felted hood and an industrially produced felt hood.

*****

Saturday, September 18th and Sunday, September 19th – 10 am to 4 pm

*Please note additional hour changes for individual artists

Susan Delaney
4611 – 48 Street, Red Deer, AB
403-341-9488
www.instagram.com/susandelaneyartist

Susan Delaney is currently making intriguing mixed media portraits and abstract compositions featuring photo image transfer, painting, drawing, collage, and embedded objects. Susan is also well known for her vibrant, expressive landscape paintings.

DEMO: Susan will be demonstrating image transfer and painting, including both deliberate and intuitive artistic decision-making.

*****

View Across the Vallery, Oil, 2021, Carol Lynn Gilchrist

Carol Lynn Gilchrist, ASA
Riverlands Artist Studio/Gallery IS
5123 – 48 Street (Alexander Way), Red Deer, AB
[email protected], 403-596-8890
www.clgilchrist.com

Carol Lynn celebrates the landscape in a range of media and styles. Her work in watercolour, acrylic, and oil are inspired by nature; skies and water worlds that are filled with light, colour and movement that are part real and part imagined. She has just opened her own studio and welcomes everyone to drop in and say hello!

DEMO: Carol Lynn will be working on a WIP (that’s art speak for a ‘work in progress’) and will share her thoughts on composition and offer some plein air painting tips.

Guest Artist at Riverlands

Roberta Murray, ASA
Riverlands Artist Studio/Gallery IS
[email protected], 587-457-1201
www.robertamurray.ca

Roberta Murray is a full-time visual storyteller working in paint, pencil, and pixels. Roberta’s work reflects her passions, dreams, and desires regardless of the medium she works in. Birds, wildlife, flora, and the land are all explored in her work. She tries to represent ordinary scenes in a poetic, expressive way to capture a fleeting mood or impression, not to mirror what is easily seen. “I don’t paint the landscape. I paint the spirit disguised as a landscape.”

*****

Country Sunshine-Watercolour, Marianne Harris

Marianne Harris
Paintwerx Studios
95 Piper Drive, Red Deer, AB
[email protected], 403-350-8106
Additional Hours: Friday 5 pm to 8 pm

Marianne creates 2D artwork in water-based media. Her work is prolific and varied in its subject, style, and size, from photographic realism to more semi-abstract pieces, often inspired from her photography. Her work is available at the A+ Gallery, and is also currently showing until October 11 in the Kiwanis Gallery at the Red Deer Library.
DEMO: Watercolour miniature landscapes demonstrating basic techniques.

Guest Artist at Paintwerx Studios

Winter Returns Again, Amanda Frost

Amanda Frost
Amanda Frost Artwork
95 Piper Drive, Red Deer, AB
[email protected], 403-596-6372
Additional Hours: Friday 5 pm to 8 pm

Amanda’s artwork is bold and beautiful, from landscapes, to animals, or a combination of the two. Photographs are often used for reference, but colours from nature’s palette are often improvised and enhanced. Her work can be seen at the A+ Gallery in downtown Red Deer.

Marlene Kallstrom-Barritt
Kallstrom Studio
5750 – 41 Street Crescent (West Park), Red Deer, AB
www.kallstromstudio.com, 403-307-3620
www.facebook.com/kallstromstudio
***Shortened Hours for Sunday, 1 pm to 4 pm

Marlene explores several water-based art mediums to create mixed media art that combines abstraction and realism. In other words, she plays with an alarmingly growing amount of art supplies to make paintings of familiar subjects done differently. Lately, she’s been waxing watercolours and working on a new series.

DEMO: explaining waxed watercolours (and showing off latest art supply purchase)

The downloadable list of artists is available HERE.

The Red Deer Arts Council is a publicly funded, non-profit organization with a mandate to support all art forms and raise the profile of the arts in the community.

 

 

Arts

Motown songwriter-producer Lamont Dozier dead at 81

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NEW YORK (AP) — Lamont Dozier, the middle name of the celebrated Holland-Dozier-Holland team that wrote and produced “You Can’t Hurry Love,” “Heat Wave” and dozens of other hits and helped make Motown an essential record company of the 1960s and beyond, has died at age 81.

Dozier’s death was confirmed Tuesday by Paul Lambert, who helped produce the stage musical “The First Wives Club” that Holland-Dozier-Holland wrote for.

In Motown’s historic, self-defined rise to the “Sound of Young America,” Holland-Dozier-Holland stood out even compared to such gifted peers as Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder and Barrett Strong. Over a four-year period, 1963-67, Dozier and brothers Brian and Eddie Holland crafted more than 25 top 10 songs and mastered the blend of pop and rhythm and blues that allowed the Detroit label, and founder Berry Gordy, to defy boundaries between Black and white music and rival the Beatles on the airwaves.

For the Four Tops, they wrote “Baby I Need Your Loving” and “Reach Out (I’ll Be There),” for Martha and the Vandellas they wrote “Heat Wave” and “Jimmy Mack,” for Marvin Gaye “Baby Don’t You Do It” and “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You).” The music lived on through countless soundtracks, samplings and radio airings, in cover versions by the Rolling Stones, Linda Ronstadt, James Taylor and many others and in generations of songwriters and musicians influenced by the Motown sound.

“Their structures were simple and direct,” Gerri Hirshey wrote in the Motown history “Nowhere to Run: The Story of Soul Music,” published in 1984. “Sometimes a song barreled to number one on the sheer voice of repetitive hooks, like a fast-food jungle that lurks, subliminally, until it connects with real hunger.”

Brian Wilson, Ron Wood and Mick Hucknall were among the many musicians offering tributes Tuesday. Carole King, who with then-husband Gerry Goffin was another leading hitmaker of the ’60s, tweeted that that “striving to keep up with them made us better songwriters.”

The polish of H-D-H was ideally suited for Motown’s signature act, Diana Ross and the Supremes, for whom they wrote 10 No. 1 songs, among them “Where Did Our Love Go,” “Stop! In the Name of Love” and “You Can’t Hurry Love.” Expectations were so high that when “Nothing But Heartaches” failed to make the top 10 in 1965, Gordy sent a company memo demanding that Motown only release chart toppers for the Supremes, an order H-D-H obeyed with “I Hear a Symphony” and several more records.

Holland-Dozier-Holland weren’t above formulas or closely repeating a previous hit, but they worked in various moods and styles: the casual joy of “How Sweet It Is (To Be Loved by You),” the escalating desire of “Heat Wave,” the urgency of “Reach Out (I’ll Be There).” Dozier’s focus was on melody and arrangements, whether the haunting echoes of the Vandellas’ backing vocals on “Nowhere To Run,” flashing lights of guitar that drive the Supremes’ “You Keep Me Hanging On,” or the hypnotic gospel piano on Gaye’s “Can I Get a Witness.”

“All the songs started out as slow ballads, but when we were in the studio we’d pick up the tempo,” Dozier told the Guardian in 2001. “The songs had to be fast because they were for teenagers – otherwise it would have been more like something for your parents. The emotion was still there, it was just under cover of the optimism that you got from the up-tempo beat.”

The prime of H-D-H, and of Motown, ended in 1968 amid questions and legal disputes over royalties and other issues. H-D-H left the label, and neither side would recover. The Four Tops and the Supremes were among the acts who suffered from no longer having their most dependable writers. Meanwhile, H-D-H’s efforts to start their own business fell far short of Motown. The labels Invictus and Hot Wax both faded within a few years, and Dozier would recall with disbelief the Hollands’ turning down such future superstars as Al Green and George Clinton. H-D-H did release several hits, including Freda Payne’s “Band of Gold” and Honey Cone’s “Want Ads.”

Holland-Dozier-Holland were inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1988 and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame two years later. On his own, Dozier had a top 20 hit with “Trying to Hold on to My Woman,” helped produce Aretha Franklin’s “Sweet Passion” album and collaborated with Eric Clapton and Hucknall among others. His biggest success was co-writing Phil Collins’ chart-topping “Two Hearts,” from the 1988 movie “Buster,” a mid-tempo, Motown-style ballad that won a Grammy and Golden Globe and received an Oscar nomination.

H-D-H reunited for a stage production of “The First Wives Club,” which premiered in 2009, but their time back together was brief and unhappy. Dozier and the Hollands clashed often and Dozier dropped out before the show launched. “I can’t see us ever working with Lamont again,” Eddie Holland wrote in “Come and Get These Memories,” a memoir by the Hollands that came out in 2019, the same year Dozier published the memoir “How Sweet It Is.”

Dozier acknowledged that his early success conflicted with his family life, but he eventually settled down with Barbara Ullman, who died in 2021 after more than 40 years of marriage. His children included the songwriter-record producer Beau Dozier and composer Paris Ray Dozier.

Like so many Motown artists, Dozier was born in Detroit and raised in a family of singers and musicians. He sang in the choir of his Baptist church and his love for words was affirmed by a grade school teacher who, he recalled, liked one of his poems so much she kept it on the blackboard for a month. By the late 1950s, he was a professional singer and eventually signed with Motown, where he first worked with Brian Holland, and then Eddie Holland, who wrote most of the lyrics.

Some of Motown’s biggest hits and catchiest phrases originated from Dozier’s domestic life. He remembered his grandfather’s addressing women as “Sugar pie, honey bunch,” the opening words and ongoing refrain of the Four Tops’ “I Can’t Help Myself (Sugar Pie, Honey Bunch).” The Four Tops hit “Bernadette” was inspired by all three songwriters having troubles with women named Bernadette, while an argument with another Dozier girlfriend helped inspire a Supremes favorite.

“She was pretty heated up because I was quite the ladies’ man at that time and I’d been cheating on her,” Dozier told the Guardian. “So she started telling me off and swinging at me until I said, ‘Stop! In the name of love!’ And as soon as I’d said it I heard a cash register in my head and laughed. My girlfriend didn’t think it was very amusing: we broke up. The only ones who were happy about it were the Supremes.”

___

For more AP entertainment news, go to https://apnews.com/hub/entertainment

Hillel Italie, The Associated Press



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Alberta

Graffiti artist completes world’s tallest mural in downtown Calgary

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CALGARY — It looms on the edge of downtown a stone’s throw from the Calgary Tower,  a splash of colour amid aging buildings, railway tracks, parkades and a steady stream of traffic.

It’s billed as the world’s tallest mural, painted by one of the globe’s top graffiti artists, and is part of a project to turn an austere area of downtown into an expansive open-air urban art gallery.

“The brutalism and dystopian look of this area with the giant parkades and the spiral ramps and stuff — it feels like Gotham. So turning this wall from concrete nothing to this is really fun,” said Peter Oliver, president of the Beltline Urban Murals Project, or BUMP.

The mural is an abstract painting in various shades of orange, black, grey, blue, white and yellow and is the creation of DAIM, an internationally renowned German artist. DAIM, whose real name is Mirko Reisser, has been creating public artworks for more than 30 years.

“DAIM’s work is rooted in graffiti art. It’s abstract and he was actually the very first graffiti artist to start exploring three-dimensional works. So his work kind of obeys the laws of light and shadow but defies the laws of gravity,” Oliver said.

“I think his work really marries well with the brutalism of this building and it’s just a massive flat wall of concrete. It’s the very first prefabricated concrete building in Calgary, built in 1980.”

The mural is 95 metres high, making it the tallest mural in the world “by a long shot,” said Oliver.

He said most cities don’t have giant concrete walls available, with the majority being glass, steel or aluminum. So this was a perfect marriage.

DAIM, who was assisted by three local artists, spent over three weeks painting and went through more than 500 cans of spray paint after a base coat was added to the bare concrete. It is to be a permanent addition to the area and, as of last week, was awaiting a coat of UV sealant to make it complete.

Facing toward the east, it can be seen from a long way away.

“If you’ve got the window seat on the airplane, you can see it on the approach into the airport,” Oliver said.

“I think what we’re really doing with BUMP is re-architecting the identity of this city.”

The project will be unveiling about 60 new murals during its annual festival, which runs from Aug. 1 to 28. Before that, the new art work can be viewed by visitors at the annual Calgary Stampede, which begins this week.

“If you’re coming down, I’d check this out over the parade any day,” Oliver said with a chuckle.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 4, 2022.

Bill Graveland, The Canadian Press

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