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RCMP say 29 year old Red Deer suspect shot by officer was carrying this weapon

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News release from Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT)

Investigation into RCMP officer-involved shooting causing injury continues

On Sept. 21, the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT) was directed to investigate a Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) officer’s discharge of his service weapon during an encounter with a 29-year-old man that day.

At about 6:08 p.m., Red Deer RCMP received a 911 call reporting a break and enter in progress at a residence in the Maxwell Avenue area by a 29-year-old man known to the homeowner. At approximately 6:10 p.m., Red Deer RCMP officers arrived on the scene and entered the residence.

Shortly thereafter, the officers confronted the man inside the residence. During the encounter, an officer discharged his service weapon, injuring the man who was able to retreat into another room. Not long after, the man surrendered and was taken into custody without further incident.

Officers on scene provided emergency first aid to the man until Emergency Medical Services (EMS) arrived and took over care before transporting the man to hospital. The man was assessed, treated and discharged from hospital back into police custody.

The civilian reporter has confirmed that he heard commands to drop a weapon prior to shots being fired. A bladed weapon was recovered at the scene. The injured man has confirmed that at the time of the officer-involved shooting, he was in possession of this weapon, which he referred to in the interview as either a “knife” or a “sword.” While this evidence provides some context for the event, there is considerably more work to be done. It remains to be established what, if anything, the man may have done with the weapon; what the officers, including the officer who discharged his firearm, observed; and what prompted the use of potentially lethal force.

ASIRT’s investigation will examine the circumstances surrounding the police officer’s discharge of his firearm. The RCMP retains responsibility for the investigation into the man’s conduct. No additional information will be released.

ASIRT’s mandate is to effectively, independently and objectively investigate incidents involving Alberta’s police that have resulted in serious injury or death to any person, as well as serious or sensitive allegations of police misconduct.

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News release from Red Deer RCMP

Red Deer RCMP officer involved shooting – Update #1

The Red Deer RCMP have laid charges in relation to the Sept. 21, 2021, officer involved shooting incident that took place at a residence in the area of Maxwell Avenue in Red Deer.

 Scott Bruno (29) of Red Deer is charged with: 

·       Assault peace officer with a weapon

·       Enter dwelling house without lawful excuse and commit indictable offence

·       Fail to comply with probation

Following a judicial hearing on Sept. 22, 2021, Bruno was released on cash bail; however, was remanded pending payment of bail.

He is scheduled to attend Red Deer Provincial Court on Sept. 24, 2021.

As this matter is now before the courts, no further details can be provided by the RCMP.

All media inquiries about the officer involved shooting incident should continue to be directed to ASIRT at 780-641-9099.

 

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Crime

Ontario doctor alleged to have killed 4 people around same date in 2021: documents

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HAWKESBURY, Ont. — Court documents allege an eastern Ontario doctor killed four people around the same date in 2021.

Dr. Brian Nadler was initially charged with first-degree murder last year in the death of 89-year-old Albert Poidinger at the Hawkesbury and District General Hospital.

At the time, police said they were investigating the doctor in connection with several other deaths at the hospital.

Ontario Provincial Police laid three additional charges of first-degree murder against Nadler on Wednesday, in the deaths of 80-year-old Claire Briere, 79-year-old Lorraine Lalande and 93-year-old Judith Lungulescu. But they declined to provide details on the new charges, including when and where the three died.

Court documents allege Poidinger was killed on March 25, 2021, and the three others “on or about” that date.

The documents say Briere, Lalande and Lungulescu also died in Hawkesbury, Ont.

Nadler’s lawyers have said their client maintains his innocence.

In a statement issued Wednesday, Brian Greenspan, David Humphrey and Naomi Lutes said Nadler provided “excellent palliative care” to the four patients, who they said died from COVID-19.

The doctor was released on bail in July of last year, and his lawyers said he was released again under the same conditions after his arrest this week.

Those conditions include that Nadler remain in Canada, reside at an approved address and notify police of any address change. He is also forbidden from practising medicine and from communicating with employees, patients and relatives of patients at the Hawkesbury hospital.

The case is set to return to court on Sept. 7.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 19, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

‘Sorry’: Crown calls for harsh sentence for Calgary man in multimillion-dollar fraud

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By Bill Graveland in Calgary

The Crown asked for a sentence of 10 to 12 years Wednesday for a Calgary man who bilked clients out of millions of dollars in a Ponzi scheme.

Arnold Breitkreutz, 74, was convicted on June 29 of fraud over $5,000 for what the Crown described as a multimillion-dollar scheme in which investors believed they were putting money into safe first mortgages.

Court heard the money from his company, Base Financial, was instead loaned to an energy industry promoter and used in a risky oil play in Texas that was secured against oil-and-gas leases and equipment.

“The Crown submits that this actually was a trust situation,” said Crown prosecutor Shelley Smith, who told court that Breitkreutz was held in “high regard” by many clients after successfully running a mortgage-broker business for years.

Smith said during the period of the offence, between May 1, 2014, and Sept. 30, 2015, investors provided Breitkreutz with more than $21.4 million as a result of his “deceit.”

“The scheme was due to collapse at some point, but the fraud persisted for a period of 17 months,” she said.

“False contracts were distributed to investors, T5 (investment income tax slips) were also distributed to investors providing a gloss of legality to the scheme. With respect to the large number of victims in this case, 107 individuals were defrauded money.”

Smith is also asking that Breitkreutz pay restitution of more than $3.1 million.

The court received 29 victim impact statements. Two of the victims were in court to read them.

William Janman and his wife invested nearly $3 million with Breitkreutz and trusted him so much they would invite him to barbecues and out to dinner.

“We will never in our lifetime recover from this loss. We find ourselves struggling with unmatched loss on a daily basis instead of enjoying the end of our life and retirement,” he told the court.

He said he and his wife have experienced guilt, shame, self-blame and depression.

“The nightmare continues.”

Another investor, whose identity is protected by a publication ban, said she feels like a fool for ignoring her initial intuition after putting her finances and company at risk.

“Who would have believed that ignoring that niggly feeling would lead to the near collapse of our business and devastating financial impacts to all of our employees,” she said.

“Please remember all the victims. I ask that you sentence Arnold Breitkreutz to the fullest extent of the law so he may think of all the lives that he has damaged.”

Breitkreutz’s lawyer said his client should serve a sentence in the five-to-eight-year range and anything above that would be unfair considering his age.

Cale Ellis-Toddington said the operations of his client were not complex and the well-heeled investors knew what they were getting into.

“It wasn’t a matter of trust. You look at the evidence of the investors and they said ‘I don’t really trust Arnold, but the fact of the matter is I was getting a great return on my investment and that’s why I invested,'” he said.

Ellis-Toddington said his client was not motivated by greed but was trying to get his investor’s money back. He said his client’s level of moral blameworthiness is low.

But Queen’s Bench Justice Colin Feasby questioned that argument.

“Is it not an abuse of trust to raise money on both the explicit and implicit representation that you are a mortgage broker dealing in Alberta mortgages and then to bait-and-switch and put that money into a Texas investment?” he asked.

“Another way to look at it is: He was running Ponzi schemes and kept kicking things down the road so he never had to have a day of reckoning.”

Breitkreutz, who has been in custody since he was found guilty, offered a brief apology.

“I can feel your loss and for that I’m unbelievably and indescribably sorry. It was not my intention when I accepted your money,” he said.

“I put your money in the same place that I put my own. Nonetheless, I feel for you deeply, as much as I can and I’m sorry.”

Feasby is to deliver his sentence on Friday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 17, 2022.

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