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RCMP Encourage Citizens to Report Activity They Deem Suspicious

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Your Calls Make the Difference.
 Your tips, no matter how small, help the RCMP better protect you. The RCMP in Alberta encourage you to immediately report any suspicious activity, person or vehicle to police. Your call might be the one that saves a life or leads to an arrest.
 
On April 22nd, RCMP officers received a tip that a wanted man was at a residence 200 kilometres northeast of Edmonton. He was quickly arrested without incident and is now back in Edmonton to face charges related to an assault at an Edmonton mall which lead to the death of a local store owner.
 
“This individual is in custody today because someone was alert enough to notice and felt they had a duty to call police,” said Corporal Ronald Bumbry, RCMP Media Relations Officer. “These calls from members of the community are critical in keeping communities safe. Citizens know their neighbourhoods better than anyone and can tell if something or someone doesn’t belong.”
 
This is only the latest example of a tip leading to an arrest. Every month, the RCMP in Alberta receive hundreds of tips from citizens that help RCMP officers take the necessary action to keep Albertans safe. Their calls help disrupt criminal activity in the community, locate dangerous individuals and raise awareness of public hazards to keep the community safe.
 
Below is just the tip of the iceberg over the last few weeks.
 
Concerned citizens stop two incidents of impaired driving
 Leduc RCMP responded to a complaint made by a concerned citizen after finding a child alone in a car with the driver of the vehicle in a nearby bar. Thanks to the quick thinking of alert community members, an impaired driver was prevented from taking the road and putting a child’s life in danger.
 
In another instance, while on patrol, a Rimbey RCMP officer was flagged down by a concerned citizen who was worried that an intoxicated individual sitting in their vehicle near the local bar may try to drive off. Thanks to this timely report, officers were able to intervene before the person left the scene to become a hazard to themselves and other drivers.  More recently, the same alert citizen contacted police about a vehicle parked in the middle of a highway with a sleeping driver inside. Police attended and found the driver to be impaired. With the vehicle seized and a license suspended, the driver will not be posing a danger on Alberta roads for quite some time.
 
Public tips stop car theft in progress
 Based on tips from concerned citizens of a suspicious male damaging a truck, Leduc RCMP was able to stop a car theft in progress. The suspect was found in the vehicle and is now facing charges of possession of stolen property and mischief.
 Acting on a tip from the public regarding a suspicious vehicle in the area, High River RCMP located and arrested three thieves suspected of robbing a store. The stolen items were recovered along with additional property believed to be stolen. The three suspects are facing charges related to theft.
 
Alert Neighbours Help Police Catch Robbers Red-Handed
 Innisfail RCMP officers disrupted a break and enter in progress thanks to a tip from a concerned neighbour who observed suspicious activity in the area. At the residence, officers found a male inside of a truck parked outside the garage and a second male inside the garage. The suspects are facing a variety of charges related to Break and Enter, Possession of a Controlled Substance and Breach of Recognizance.
 
For more stories visit Todayville.com

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Alberta

Calgary police identify 15-year-old girl killed in shooting, investigation continues

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Calgary (CP) – Calgary police have identified a 15-year-old girl who was fatally shot this week as investigators try to determine whether she was the intended target or if it was a case of mistaken identity.

Officers responded to reports of a shooting in an alley in the Martindale neighbourhood early Tuesday morning.

They say the teenager was a passenger in a vehicle when she was shot and that the driver, who was not injured, immediately fled the scene before pulling over to call police.

Police say investigators have received several tips from the public.

They say evidence from the scene leads police to believe it was targeted, but investigators haven’t determined whether the occupants of the vehicle were the intended targets.

The girl has been identified as Sarah Alexis Jorquera of Calgary.

“This was a senseless act of violence that took the life of a young girl,” Staff Sgt. Martin Schiavetta of the homicide unit said in a statement Wednesday.

“At this point, we have more questions than answers and are working around the clock to hold those responsible accountable. Losing a 15-year-old is a tragic loss for our community, her school, her friends and, most importantly, her family.”

Police ask anyone with any information about the shooting to call investigators.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 29, 2023.

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Crime

Children lost in shooting were ‘feisty,’ a ‘shining light’

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This undated photo shows Evelyn Dieckhaus a student at The Covenant School in Nashville, Tenn. Dieckhaus was one of six people killed on Monday, March 27, 2023, in the shooting at the school. (AP Photo)

By Adrian Sainz, Kristin M. Hall, Holly Meyer And Ben Finley in Nashville

NASHVILLE (AP) — Details from the rich, full lives of the three adults killed Monday at a Nashville elementary school have emerged quickly in the aftermath, but information on the three 9-year-old children — whose lives ended tragically young — has been slower to publicly surface from a community buried in grief.

The children slain at The Covenant School were Hallie Scruggs, described by an aunt as “always on the go”; Evelyn Dieckhaus, her family’s “shining light”; and William Kinney, whose family has said little publicly so far.

A woman who identified herself as Hallie’s aunt, Kara Scruggs Arnold, wrote on Facebook that Hallie was “incredibly smart, feisty enough to keep up with her 3 brothers and my 4 boys.”

Hallie had a “love for life that kept her smiling and running and jumping and playing and always on the go,” Arnold added in her post.

Hallie’s father Chad Scruggs is the lead pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church, which is associated with The Covenant School. The private Christian school has about 200 students from preschool through sixth grade, as well as roughly 50 staff members, according to its website.

Evelyn was described as the Dieckhaus family’s “shining light” on a GoFundMe page that has been set up for them. But her family, too, was reluctant to talk about her or the enormity of their loss.

The adults who were killed were Katherine Koonce, 60, the head of the school, Mike Hill, 61, a custodian, and Cynthia Peak, 61, a substitute teacher.

In a video statement released Tuesday evening, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Peak was supposed to have dinner with his wife, Maria, after filling in as a substitute teacher at Covenant.

“Maria woke up this morning without one of her best friends,” Lee said, adding that Peak, Koonce and his wife had once taught together and “have been family friends for decades.”

Sandra McCalla, a former administrator at the high school Peak attended in Shreveport, Louisiana, said Peak served as the statistician at girls’ basketball games and track meets before graduating in 1979.

“She was busy in the background making good things happen,” said McCalla, who served as the principal of Captain Shreve High School for 30 years.

Chuck Owen, who knew Peak from childhood, said Peak’s father was a well-known doctor in Leesville, Louisiana, where the family lived before moving to Shreveport.

He said, “everyone knew her, knew her family” and that she was “just a sweet person from a sweet family.”

Owen added that Peak was a devout follower of God, and it did not surprise him that she was working at a Christian school.

“She told me that she got saved in college and that God’s love changed her life,” he said.

Nashville songwriter Natalie Hemby posted on Instagram that Peak “taught me how to swim. Keep my head above water… which is what we’re all trying to do right now.”

Peak’s family issued a statement saying their “hearts are broken,” and called Peak “a pillar of the community, and a teacher beloved by all her students.”

“She never wavered in her faith and we know she is wrapped in the arms of Jesus,” the statement said.

Koonce, the head of The Covenant School, was a woman of deep faith who saw educating kids as her mission.

“It’s what God called her to do,” close friend Jackie Bailey said.

“We’re in such shock,” Bailey added. “I was looking around my house, and every piece of cross stitch that I have on the wall, she did – she gave to me.”

One of them said: “A friend loveth at all times.”

“That’s Proverb 17:17,” Bailey said. “That’s the kind of person she was. She loved at all times.”

Bailey added: “If there was any trouble in that school, she would run to it, not from it. She was trying to protect those kids … That’s just what I believe.”

Koonce’s family said in a statement Wednesday that she “gave her life to protect the students she loved.”

“We are devastated by our loss but depending on our God for comfort and healing,” the family said. “It is our privilege to honor Katherine’s legacy and to celebrate her remarkable spirit.”

Before Koonce took the top role with Covenant, Anna Caudill, a former art teacher, worked with her for almost a decade at Christ Presbyterian Academy, another Christian school in the area connected to a Presbyterian Church in America congregation.

“She was an absolute dynamo and one of the smartest women I’ll ever know,” said Caudill, recalling how Koonce excelled at her day job while parenting her children, pursuing her masters and then her PhD, and writing a book.

Caudill, who grew up in several male-led Christian denominations, said Koonce was the first woman in such a setting to encourage her to keep learning and pursuing her life goals.

“She wasn’t Wonder Woman, but I never saw the two in the same place,” Caudill said.

Friends of Hill, the custodian, said they believed he would have died protecting the school’s children.

Pastor Tim Dunavant, of the Hartsville First United Methodist Church, said in a Facebook post that he hired Hill to work at Covenant more than a decade ago.

“I don’t know the details yet. But I have a feeling, when it all comes out, Mike’s sacrifice saved lives,” Dunavant wrote.

Hill’s family issued a statement saying, “We pray for the Covenant School and are so grateful that Michael was beloved by the faculty and students who filled him with joy for 14 years. He was a father of seven children … and 14 grandchildren. He liked to cook and spend time with family.”

Another pastor, Jim Bachmann, said Hill was “one of those people you cannot not like” and that he made a point of learning the names of all the students and talking to them.

Bachmann was the founding pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church, which runs the school, and is the current pastor of Stephens Valley Church, where Hill was a member and sometimes served as a greeter.

On those occasions, Hill would “dress up like he was going to meet the president of the United States,” Bachmann said. He added, “Everybody loved Mike, and he loved them back.”

___

Associated Press reporters Travis Loller in Nashville and Beatrice Dupuy in New York contributed to this story. Sainz reported from Memphis. Finley reported from Norfolk, Virginia.

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