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Freedom Convoy

Our leaders are turning our country into one of the places we used to defend people against

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From John Stossel.

If politicians are frightened by a protest, some will take your money and your rights.  If the government doesn’t like your speech, or your business, you may face financial tyranny.

Truckers protesting Canada’s COVID vaccine rules had their bank accounts frozen. “You do have to have a bank account, really, to be able to live,” says law professor Todd Zywicki. Freezing accounts ended the protests quickly. “It’s a very big threat to a free society,” says Zywicki. “We need to tolerate people saying things we don’t like.” But politicians often don’t. If they can silence protest by grabbing your money, they will.

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John Stossel

After 40+ years of reporting, I now understand the importance of limited government and personal freedom.

Libertarian journalist John Stossel created Stossel TV to explain liberty and free markets to young people. Prior to Stossel TV he hosted a show on Fox Business and co-anchored ABC’s primetime newsmagazine show, 20/20. Stossel’s economic programs have been adapted into teaching kits by a non-profit organization, “Stossel in the Classroom.” High school teachers in American public schools now use the videos to help educate their students on economics and economic freedom. They are seen by more than 12 million students every year. Stossel has received 19 Emmy Awards and has been honored five times for excellence in consumer reporting by the National Press Club. Other honors include the George Polk Award for Outstanding Local Reporting and the George Foster Peabody Award.

 

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Freedom Convoy

Emergencies Act inquiry will be delayed until October due to commissioner’s illness

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By David Fraser in Ottawa

The inquiry into Ottawa’s unprecedented use of the Emergencies Act during protests last winter will be delayed until October because of a health issue.

The Public Order Emergency Commission was to begin hearings Sept. 19 but will be delayed now until Oct. 13, a statement from the commission said Friday.

Six weeks have been scheduled for the hearings so they will now finish on Nov. 25. The commission has until mid-February to deliver its report.

The delay comes because commissioner Paul Rouleau is undergoing surgery.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau invoked the Emergencies Act in February amid border blockades and the occupation of downtown Ottawa by protesters demonstrating against the Trudeau government and COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

There is a legal requirement to create a public review commission to look into the decision to use the Emergencies Act. A parliamentary committee is also separately conducting its own study on why the act was invoked.

Police forces, organizers of the “Freedom Convoy” and all three levels of government are expected to testify at the hearings. Parties with standing at the commission were told about the delay Friday afternoon.

Roleau said in a statement he was committed to completing the commission’s work in a “timely manner.”

“Commission staff, with the co-operation of all parties, has made significant progress over the past several weeks in obtaining and reviewing documents, conducting interviews, and preparing for the start of public hearings.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 2, 2022.

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COVID-19

Public hearings in Emergencies Act inquiry to start in September

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OTTAWA — The inquiry into Ottawa’s unprecedented use of the Emergencies Act during protests in February will start its public hearings next month.

The Public Order Emergency Commission announced today that it expects the hearings to run from Sept. 19 until Oct. 28 at Library and Archives Canada in downtown Ottawa.

Commissioner Paul Rouleau said in a statement that he intends to hold the government to account and wants the inquiry to be as “open and transparent” as possible.

Hearings will be livestreamed online and members of the public will have opportunities to share their views, with a final report expected early next year.

Parties to the inquiry including “Freedom Convoy” organizers, police forces and all three levels of government are expected to testify and contribute documentary evidence on the invocation of the act in February.

The federal Liberals made the move amid border blockades and the occupation of downtown Ottawa by protesters demonstrating against COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 15, 2022.

The Canadian Press

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