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No country has studied COVID19 like Iceland – What can we learn?

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From ZdoggMD.com

Tiny Iceland can teach the entire world what happens when you science the crap out of a pandemic.

 

 

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Alberta

Utility Deferral Program: Adding Insult to Injury

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Utility Deferral Program: Adding Insult to Injury

Open Letter to Alberta MLAs and the Alberta Utilities Commission

July 23, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Red Deer – Mountain View, AB

“There are people in need of help. Charity is one of the nobler human motivations. The act of reaching into one’s own pockets to help a fellow man in need is praiseworthy and laudable. Reaching into someone else’s pocket is despicable and worthy of condemnation.” – Dr. Walter E. Williams

Recent news indicating that Alberta ratepayers will be responsible for the outstanding debt owed to gas and electricity providers from 2020’s three-month utility deferral program is beyond frustrating.

There is no question that many Albertans needed to take advantage of this deferral program when the government arbitrarily and unilaterally shuttered their livelihoods in 2020. There is also no question that outstanding debt from this program should not be the responsibility of Albertan ratepayers, many of whom saw significant reductions in income over the past year and a half due to government mandates.

As per a CBC article, Geoff Scotton, a spokesperson with the Alberta Utilities Commission, states “Now we’re in a situation where providers, in good faith, who enabled those payment deferrals, need to be made whole. That’s really the goal here.”

When will Albertans who had their lives and livelihoods deferred for a year and half be made whole?

Instead of the proposed repayment plan, I suggest the following remedies for the outstanding debt:

  1. The expected debt of $16 million should be split among all sitting MLAs and any other government bureaucrats who advocated for lockdowns and be repaid personally.
  2. The utility companies, specifically CEOs and senior managers, reach into their own pockets, help their fellow man in need and personally repay the debt.

Families, private sector employees and small business owners have suffered greatly over the past year and a half. Adding further costs to their already limited budgets is not acceptable. Please do better.

Sincerely,

Jared Pilon

Libertarian Party Candidate for Red Deer – Mountain View, AB

https://www.jaredpilon.com/

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COVID-19

John Carpay takes leave after hiring Private Investigator to observe Manitoba’s Chief Justice: Statements from Justice Centre and Carpay

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As Covid restrictions moved past the initial promise of two weeks into months and waves, John Carpay and The Justice Centre have taken on significant prominence for individuals and businesses fighting against them.  For those who believe their rights have been infringed by Covid restrictions the Justice Centre offers an extensive and free list of information on its website, including an entire ‘living’ book, constantly updated with the latest information on the rights and freedoms in respect to the various sets of Covid restrictions across Canada.  Those facing legal challenges, are offered direct connection with members of their legal team.

This week the President of the Justice Centre, John Carpay suddenly stepped down.  In his statement to the Board of Directors for the Justice Centre Carpay says he went too far when he decided to hire a private investigator to observe Manitoba Chief Justice Glenn Joyal.  Carpay says he was trying to confirm information that certain members of Manitoba’s leadership responsible for enforcing strict restrictions, were violating those same restrictions.  

Here are the statements made by both he Board of Directors of the Justice Centre, and former President John Carpay as posted on the website of the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms 

Statement from the Board of Directors of the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms

On Monday July 12, 2021, the members of the Board of Directors of the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms (Justice Centre) were informed that a private investigator had been retained by Justice Centre President John Carpay to conduct surveillance on senior government officials, including Chief Justice Joyal of the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench, in regard to their compliance with Covid regulations.

No member of the Board had any prior notice or knowledge of this plan and had not been consulted on it. Had the Board been advised of the plan, it would have immediately brought it to an end. Mr. Carpay has acknowledged that he made the decision unilaterally. Apart from the Justice Centre’s Litigation Director, none of the Justice Centre’s lawyers or Board members were aware that this was occurring until July 12.

The Justice Centre’s mandate is to defend Canadians’ constitutional freedoms through litigation and education. Surveilling public officials is not what we do. We condemn what was done without reservation. We apologize to Chief Justice Joyal for the alarm, disturbance, and violation of privacy. All such activity has ceased and will not reoccur in future.

For years, Mr. Carpay has been a tireless advocate for Canadians’ constitutional rights and freedoms. With the integrity that we know him for, he has owned this mistake, openly, directly, and without reservation. Mr. Carpay has advised the Board that, effective today, he is taking an indefinite period of leave from his responsibilities at the Justice Centre. The Board will appoint an interim president to serve in his absence, and has instituted a comprehensive review of Justice Centre operations and decision-making.


Statement by John Carpay, President – July 12, 2021

As has been communicated in the media, I apologized this morning to Chief Justice Joyal in the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench for my decision to include him in passive observation conducted by a private investigator at my request, to hold government officials accountable.  In an error of judgement, Chief Justice Joyal was included with the observation of government officials.

No other judges were included. Over the last 16 months, Canadians have faced unprecedented restrictions on their Charter-guaranteed freedoms to travel, assemble, associate with others, and worship. The Justice Centre’s mandate is to defend Canadians’ constitutional freedoms through litigation and education.

When public officials breach health orders, as we saw recently with Alberta Premier Kenney’s “Sky Palace” dinner, it is evidence that they do not feel compelled to abide by the same restrictions which they impose on other citizens, often with significant penalties. It was reported to the Justice Centre that Manitoba’s leadership were similarly breaching public health regulations.  I made the decision to hire an investigator to ascertain whether this was true.

In no way was this intended to influence or impact the Justice Centre’s litigation efforts, or any of our court cases.  This decision was my own initiative, and was not discussed with Justice Centre clients, staff lawyers or Board members.

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