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Messenger Meats aims to meet community needs

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Through the family business, Mercedes Messinger is a long time community supporter.   That’s part of the reason why the owner of Messinger Meats found herself at the 2019 Red Deer Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year Awards last fall.  Messenger Meats was nominated for Business of the Year and Mercedes was listening to the finalists for another category when she heard something that stayed with her.  Though she was a long time supporter of the Central Alberta Pregnancy Care Centre, Messinger had no idea the organization actually provided homes to new mothers as they sorted through life with their newborns.  This discovery lead Messinger down a path that culminated in a beautiful announcement in her store at the beginning of 2020.  In the following video Mercedes Messinger explains a new initiative she’s undertaken to bring a little financial help and even more awareness to worthy Not For Profit organizations.

 

Every Thursday though 2020, Messinger Meats will donate 2 dollars from every meal purchased to the chosen Not For Profit.   These organizations include ASPIRE Special Needs Resource Centre, Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre, Central Alberta Pregnancy Care Centre, Central Alberta Refugee Effort,  Central Alberta Sexual Assault Support Centre, The Lending Cupboard, The Mustard Seed, Potters Hands, Safe Harbour Society, Smiles Thru Lindsey Foundation, Turning Point, and Vantage Community Services.

Potters Hands was the first charity selected.  At the end of every month, the recipient of the support will select another not for profit organization from the list.

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Statistics Canada reports merchandise trade deficit $160 million in December

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Ottawa – Statistics Canada says the country posted a merchandise trade deficit of $160 million in December as both exports and imports fell compared with November.

The result followed a revised deficit of $219 million for November compared with an initial reading for the month that showed a $41 million deficit.

Statistics Canada says exports in December fell 1.2 per cent in the month to $63.0 billion. Energy exports fell 7.6 per cent to $14.3 billion, while exports of farm, fishing and intermediate food products dropped 9.9 per cent to $5.3 billion.

Meanwhile, imports dropped 1.3 per cent in December to $63.1 billion as imports of consumer goods fell 6.4 per cent to $12.1 billion and motor vehicles and parts dropped 6.0 per cent to $9.9 billion.

In volume terms, total exports in December rose 0.9 per cent, while import volumes fell 1.9 per cent.

For the whole of 2022, Statistics Canada says the country posted a merchandise trade surplus of $20.1 billion, up from a surplus of $4.6 billion in 2021.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 7, 2023.

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Britcoin? UK gets closer to launching a digital currency

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By Danica Kirka in London

LONDON (AP) — Britcoin is moving closer to reality.

U.K. authorities on Monday said British businesses and consumers are likely to need a digital version of the pound, formally asking for public comment on the idea of introducing a central bank digital currency.

Britain, home to the world’s second-biggest financial center, is trailing former colonies such as Nigeria, the Bahamas and Jamaica in rolling out a digital currency. More than 80% of the world’s central banks are considering launching digital currencies or have already done so, according to the consultant PwC.

“While cash is here to stay, a digital pound issued and backed by the Bank of England could be a new way to pay that’s trusted, accessible and easy to use,” Treasury chief Jeremy Hunt said in a statement. “That’s why we want to investigate what is possible first, whilst always making sure we protect financial stability.”

The call for public input comes almost two years after the Treasury and Bank of England said they were considering introducing a digital currency.

While Prime Minister Rishi Sunak suggested naming the initiative “Britcoin” when he was Treasury chief, the Bank of England has stressed that the potential currency shouldn’t be confused with cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.

Backed by the central bank, the new currency would be “reliable and retain its value over time,” in contrast to cryptocurrencies that can fluctuate wildly and threaten the holdings of investors, the Bank of England says on its website.

That industry has been particularly unstable in recent months, escalating calls for greater regulation. Crypto crashes last yeartanked assets, while crypto exchange FTX’s multibillion-dollar collapse and bankruptcy in November triggered fraud chargesagainst founder Sam Bankman-Fried.

The proposed digital currency would be denominated in pounds, with 10 pounds of digital currency always equal to a 10-pound note, the bank said. Held in a digital wallet, the currency could be used to pay for goods and services electronically.

Supporters of central bank digital currencies say they make digital transactions easier and cheaper and expand access to the financial system because they can be used by people who don’t have bank accounts.

This is one of the reasons the Bahamas became the first country to introduce a digital currency in 2020. Nigeria and Jamaica have since followed suit, with China and more than 20 other countries running trial projects. The U.S. and European Union are considering introducing digital currencies.

But digital currencies also present risks, including cyberattacks, privacy concerns and the danger that they can be used by criminals.

Because money invested in central bank digital currencies is safer than a bank deposit, they also may draw savings away from commercial banks and weaken the financial system, critics argue.

A digital pound would have “risks but no obvious benefits,” former Bank of England Gov. Mervyn King, now a member of the House of Lords, said recently.

While such digital currencies may be useful in countries that don’t have effective banking systems, that’s not the case in the Britain, he said.

“The government has said that it wants the U.K. to be at the forefront of innovation, crypto-assets and fintech, but we need to be selective and not driven by a misplaced enthusiasm for all things crypto,” King said.

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