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Last Day Of School, High School Grads, Lacombe Afghan Monument

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2:00 pm – An investigation by the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) and Didsbury RCMP has resulted in Child Pornography charges being laid against a Didsbury resident. Read More.
12:28 pm – Lacombe County Council decided to defer the further study into a potential boat launch at Anderson Park. This boat launch was considered for the east shore of Gull Lake at the County-run Anderson Park, which is located between the Wilson’s Beach and New Saratoga residential subdivisions. Read More.
12:19 pm – Red Deer’s Safe Harbour Society is receiving $36,151 from the Alberta Government for maintenance and upgrades that address fire, health and safety risks. Read More.
12:13 pm – Spending Canada Day in Red Deer? Here’s what going on in our City to celebrate Canada 150!
12:03 pm – Lindsay Thurber student Ursulla Khan has been named as one of 32 students from across Alberta to sit on the Minster’s Youth Council. Read More.
9:58 am – The 2017 All Canada Sheep Classic starts today at Westerner Park! June 29 – July 1. Details Here.
9:29 am – Live tune on the Ross Street Patio from 11:30 am – 1:00 pm today! Read More.
9:17 am – Road construction continues throughout Red Deer today. Plan your travels by avoiding the congestion. Details Here.
9:10 am – The City of Red Deer has provided an update on the 67th Street / Johnstone Drive Roundabout project. Expect construction to continue there throughout the summer. Read More.

9:00 am – The outdoor tennis courts in Red Deer’s Rotary Recreation Park are expected to re-open Saturday, July 1st after resurfacing work this spring. Read More.

 8:49 am – Ponoka RCMP are hoping you can help them find 34 year old Joseph Buffalo. He’s been reported as missing and was last seen on June 26th around 1:30 pm in the area of the Centennial Centre in Ponoka. He’s described as 5’11” tall, 180 lbs, Brown hair, Brown eyes and last seen wearing a navy sweater and grey sweat pants.
8:43 am – RCMP in Rocky Mountain House are investigating after a break, enter, and theft from the “The Beer Cabin” liquor store In Nordegg. It happened around 4:30 a.m. on June 28th. Officers responded and found the suspects had already left. The suspect vehicle is described as a white Ford F-250 or F-350, possibly a diesel, was used to force entry into the liquor store and then several males entered the store and stole property.  Two men in the group were seen to have guns and were making efforts to disguise their identity. There were no employees present in the liquor store at the time of the incident. Investigators have been provided a partial license plate for the suspect vehicle: BJJ5(Alberta).

8:35 am – After receiving tips from the public, charges have been laid against 23 year old Jared McLeod of Red Deer in relation to an April 23rd vehicle theft at the Best Western Hotel in Rimbey. Read More.

8:21 am – It’s a special day in the City of Lacombe today. Dignitaries such as Lacombe MP Blaine Calkins, MLA for Lacombe-Ponoka Ron Orr and Mayor Steve Christie will celebrate the arrival of the LAVIII Monument. It’s part of the Lacombe Afghanistan Memorial Project. The event takes place at 1:00 pm at the Lacombe Legion Hall at 5138 49th Street.

For more local news, click here!

8:11 am – Today is the official last day of classes for thousands of Red Deer Catholic Regional School students. However, Graduation ceremonies will take place on Friday, June 30th for students of Ecole Secondaire Notre Dame High School in Red Deer and St. Dominic Catholic High School in Rocky Mountain House. Notre Dame’s Grad will be at the Enmax Centrium starting at 10:00 am, while St. Dominic’s Grad will be at the Lou Soppit Community Centre in Rocky starting at 5:00 pm.

7:58 am – Students at Red Deer’s Gateway Christian School will be celebrating their graduation with family and friends today. Grad ceremonies take place at the First Christian Reformed Church starting at 4:30 pm.

7:53 am – Today marks the last day of school for over ten thousand Red Deer Public School students. This means there will also be an early dismissal this afternoon and report cards will be sent home.

For more local news, click here!

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Media

Trudeau’s Online News Act has crushed hundreds of local Canadian news outlets: study

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From LifeSiteNews

By Clare Marie Merkowsky

Trudeau’s Online News Act, framed as a way to support local media, has hurt small media outlets while giving massive payouts to legacy media, a study has found.

According to a new study, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Online News Act has successfully crushed local media outlets while mainstream media has remained relatively unaffected.  

According to an April study from the Media Ecosystem Observatory, Trudeau’s Online News Act, also known as Bill C-18, has caused a 84 percent drop in engagement for local Canadian outlets, as Big Tech company Meta – the parent company of Facebook and Instagram – has refused to publish links to Canadian news outlets on their platforms.  

“We lost 70 per cent of our audience when that happened,” Iain Burns, the managing editor of Now Media Group, which manages news posts for outlets serving smaller communities, revealed. He further explained that he experienced a 50 percent loss in revenue following the move. 

“We’re not the only ones. Many, many outlets are in this situation,” Burns added.

The Online News Act, passed by the Senate in June 2023, mandates that Big Tech companies pay to publish Canadian content on their platforms. While the legislation promised to support local media, it has seemingly accomplished the opposite.  

While Meta has blocked all news on its platforms, devastating small publishers, Google agreed to pay Canadian legacy media outlets $100 million to publish their content online. 

The study, a collaboration between the University of Toronto and McGill University, examined the 987 Facebook pages of Canadian news outlets, 183 personal pages of politicians, commentators and advocacy groups, and 589 political and local community groups.  

“The ban undoubtedly had a major impact on Canadian news,” the study found.  

“Local news outlets have been particularly affected by the ban: while large, national news outlets were less reliant on Facebook for visibility and able to recoup some of their Facebook engagement regardless, hundreds of local news outlets have left the platform entirely, effectively gutting the visibility of local news content,” it explained.   

However, LifeSiteNews has been relatively unaffected by the ban as viewership on its official Facebook page has remained relatively the same, similar to its Instagram account since most views already came from the United States.  

Similarly unaffected was Meta: “We find little evidence that Facebook usage has been impacted by the ban.”  

“After the ban took effect, the collapse of Canadian news content production and engagement on Facebook did not appear to substantially affect users themselves,” the study said.  

While local media outlets’ viewership has declined thanks to Trudeau’s new legislation, larger media outlets have thrived due to increased payouts from the Trudeau government.  

Legacy media journalists are projected to have roughly half of their salaries paid by the Liberal government after the $100 million Google agreement and the subsidies outlined in the Fall Economic Statement.  

Mainstream Canadian media had already received massive federal payouts, but they have nearly doubled after Trudeau announced increased subsidies for legacy media outlets ahead of the 2025 election. The subsidies are expected to cost taxpayers $129 million over the next five years.   

However, just as government payouts increase, Canadians’ trust in mainstream media has decreased. Recent polling found that only one-third of Canadians consider mainstream media trustworthy and balanced.   

Similarly, a recent study by Canada’s Public Health Agency revealed that less than a third of Canadians displayed “high trust” in the federal government, with “large media organizations” as well as celebrities getting even lower scores.  

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Indigenous

No accounts on $7.9 million dollar ‘Truth’ Fund

Published on

From the Frontier Centre for Public Policy

By Blacklock’s Reporter

The First Nation prompted an international outcry in 2021 when it announced the discovery of 215 children’s graves hidden at the Kamloops Residential School. It said remains were found using ground penetrating radar.

Cabinet at the time lowered the Peace Tower flag at half mast for 161 days, approved $3.1 million for a national Residential Schools Student Death Register and another $238.8 million for a Residential Schools Missing Children Community Support Fund.

The Department of Crown-Indigenous Relations has confirmed it spent millions to uncover the “heartbreaking truth” of unmarked Indian Residential School graves in Kamloops, B.C. No remains have been recovered to date and no accounting of what became of the $7.9 million has been disclosed.

“The community had received $7.9 million for field work, records searches and to secure the Residential School grounds,” said Carolane Gratton, spokesperson for the department. “Details of initiatives taken by Tk’emlups te Secwepemc First Nation are best directed to the community.”

The department has not released financial accounts under the Access To Information Act. The First Nation said in a statement it “continues to grieve children that are in our care and are focused on the scientific work that needs to be done” but would not discuss the $7.9 million.

The 2021 funding was to document the “heartbreaking truth,” according to a 2022 department briefing note. “Our thoughts are with survivors, their families and communities as the heartbreaking truth about Residential Schools’ unmarked burials continues to be unveiled,” said the note.

“Funding is available to support communities, survivors and their families on their healing journey through researching, locating and memorializing those children who died while attending Indian Residential Schools,” said the note Indian Residential School Sites: Unmarked Burials.

“If pressed on Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Kamloops Indian Residential School site, the Government of Canada has provided $7.9 million over two years to the Tk’emlups te Secwepemc Nation to support the community in conducting this important work,” said the note.

The First Nation prompted an international outcry in 2021 when it announced the discovery of 215 children’s graves hidden at the Kamloops Residential School. It said remains were found using ground penetrating radar.

Cabinet at the time lowered the Peace Tower flag at half mast for 161 days, approved $3.1 million for a national Residential Schools Student Death Register and another $238.8 million for a Residential Schools Missing Children Community Support Fund. The Fund expires in 2025.

“I think Canadians have seen with horror those unmarked graves across the country and realize that what happened decades ago isn’t part of our history, it is an irrefutable part of our present,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau earlier told reporters.

No remains have been recovered at the Kamloops site to date. A Senate committee in a 2023 report described questions regarding documentation of the 215 graves as “Residential School denialism.”

“Denialism serves to distract people from the horrific consequences of Residential Schools and the realities of missing children, burials and unmarked graves,” said the Senate Indigenous peoples committee report Honouring The Children Who Never Came Home. It recommended “the Government of Canada take every action necessary to combat the rise of Residential School denialism.”

Published with kind permission from Blacklock’s Reporter. First published here.

Blacklock’s Reporter (founded October 2012) is an Ottawa-based Internet publication covering Canadian government administration.

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