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Last Day Of School, High School Grads, Lacombe Afghan Monument

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2:00 pm – An investigation by the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team (ALERT) and Didsbury RCMP has resulted in Child Pornography charges being laid against a Didsbury resident. Read More.
12:28 pm – Lacombe County Council decided to defer the further study into a potential boat launch at Anderson Park. This boat launch was considered for the east shore of Gull Lake at the County-run Anderson Park, which is located between the Wilson’s Beach and New Saratoga residential subdivisions. Read More.
12:19 pm – Red Deer’s Safe Harbour Society is receiving $36,151 from the Alberta Government for maintenance and upgrades that address fire, health and safety risks. Read More.
12:13 pm – Spending Canada Day in Red Deer? Here’s what going on in our City to celebrate Canada 150!
12:03 pm – Lindsay Thurber student Ursulla Khan has been named as one of 32 students from across Alberta to sit on the Minster’s Youth Council. Read More.
9:58 am – The 2017 All Canada Sheep Classic starts today at Westerner Park! June 29 – July 1. Details Here.
9:29 am – Live tune on the Ross Street Patio from 11:30 am – 1:00 pm today! Read More.
9:17 am – Road construction continues throughout Red Deer today. Plan your travels by avoiding the congestion. Details Here.
9:10 am – The City of Red Deer has provided an update on the 67th Street / Johnstone Drive Roundabout project. Expect construction to continue there throughout the summer. Read More.

9:00 am – The outdoor tennis courts in Red Deer’s Rotary Recreation Park are expected to re-open Saturday, July 1st after resurfacing work this spring. Read More.

 8:49 am – Ponoka RCMP are hoping you can help them find 34 year old Joseph Buffalo. He’s been reported as missing and was last seen on June 26th around 1:30 pm in the area of the Centennial Centre in Ponoka. He’s described as 5’11” tall, 180 lbs, Brown hair, Brown eyes and last seen wearing a navy sweater and grey sweat pants.
8:43 am – RCMP in Rocky Mountain House are investigating after a break, enter, and theft from the “The Beer Cabin” liquor store In Nordegg. It happened around 4:30 a.m. on June 28th. Officers responded and found the suspects had already left. The suspect vehicle is described as a white Ford F-250 or F-350, possibly a diesel, was used to force entry into the liquor store and then several males entered the store and stole property.  Two men in the group were seen to have guns and were making efforts to disguise their identity. There were no employees present in the liquor store at the time of the incident. Investigators have been provided a partial license plate for the suspect vehicle: BJJ5(Alberta).

8:35 am – After receiving tips from the public, charges have been laid against 23 year old Jared McLeod of Red Deer in relation to an April 23rd vehicle theft at the Best Western Hotel in Rimbey. Read More.

8:21 am – It’s a special day in the City of Lacombe today. Dignitaries such as Lacombe MP Blaine Calkins, MLA for Lacombe-Ponoka Ron Orr and Mayor Steve Christie will celebrate the arrival of the LAVIII Monument. It’s part of the Lacombe Afghanistan Memorial Project. The event takes place at 1:00 pm at the Lacombe Legion Hall at 5138 49th Street.

For more local news, click here!

8:11 am – Today is the official last day of classes for thousands of Red Deer Catholic Regional School students. However, Graduation ceremonies will take place on Friday, June 30th for students of Ecole Secondaire Notre Dame High School in Red Deer and St. Dominic Catholic High School in Rocky Mountain House. Notre Dame’s Grad will be at the Enmax Centrium starting at 10:00 am, while St. Dominic’s Grad will be at the Lou Soppit Community Centre in Rocky starting at 5:00 pm.

7:58 am – Students at Red Deer’s Gateway Christian School will be celebrating their graduation with family and friends today. Grad ceremonies take place at the First Christian Reformed Church starting at 4:30 pm.

7:53 am – Today marks the last day of school for over ten thousand Red Deer Public School students. This means there will also be an early dismissal this afternoon and report cards will be sent home.

For more local news, click here!

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Energy

Satellite photos show aftermath of Abu Dhabi oil site attack

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DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Satellite photos obtained by The Associated Press on Tuesday appear to show the aftermath of a fatal attack on an oil facility in the capital of the United Arab Emirates claimed by Yemen’s Houthi rebels.

The attack brought the long-running Yemen war into Emirati territory on Monday. That conflict raged on overnight with Saudi-led airstrikes pounding Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, killing and wounding civilians.

Meanwhile, fears over new disruptions to global energy supplies after the Abu Dhabi attack pushed benchmark Brent crude to its highest price in years.

The images by Planet Labs PBC analyzed by the AP show smoke rising over an Abu Dhabi National Oil Co. fuel depot in the Mussafah neighborhood of Abu Dhabi after the attack. Another image taken shortly after appears to show scorch marks and white fire-suppressing foam deployed on the grounds of the depot.

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Co., known by the acronym ADNOC, is the state-owned energy firm that provides much of the wealth of the UAE, a federation of seven sheikhdoms on the Arabian Peninsula and also home to Dubai.

ADNOC did not respond to questions from the AP asking about the site and damage estimates from the attack. The company had said the attack happened around 10 a.m. Monday.

“We are working closely with the relevant authorities to determine the exact cause and a detailed investigation has commenced,” ADNOC said in an earlier statement.

The attack killed two Indian nationals and one Pakistani as three tankers at the site exploded, police said. Six people were also wounded at the facility, which is near Al-Dhafra Air Base, a massive Emirati installation that is also home to American and French forces.

Another fire also struck Abu Dhabi International Airport, though damage in that attack could not be seen. Journalists have not been able to view the sites attacked and state-run media have not published photographs of the areas.

Police described the assault as a suspected drone attack. The Houthis claimed they used cruise and ballistic missiles in the attack, without offering evidence.

Meanwhile Tuesday, the Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen announced it had started a bombing campaign targeting Houthi sites in the capital of Sanaa. It said it also struck a drone-operating base in Nabi Shuaib Mountain near Sanaa.

Overnight videos released by the Houthis showed damage, with the rebels saying the airstrikes killed at least 14 people. Sanaa resident Hassan al-Ahdal said one airstrike hit the house of Brig. Gen. Abdalla Kassem al-Junaid, who heads the Air Academy. He said at least three families were living in the house. Another adjunct house with a four-member family was damaged.

The Saudi-led coalition has faced international criticism for airstrikes hitting civilian targets during the war.

For hours Monday, Emirati officials did not acknowledge the Houthi claims over the Abu Dhabi attack, even as other countries condemned the assault. Senior Emirati diplomat Anwar Gargash broke the silence on Twitter, saying that Emirati authorities were handling the rebel group’s “vicious attack on some civilian facilities” with “transparency and responsibility.”

The office of South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who had been in the Emirates on a state visit, said he spoke to Abu Dhabi’s powerful Crown Prince, Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, immediately after the attack.

The statement quoted Sheikh Mohammed as saying the attack had been “anticipated.” The two had been scheduled to meet during Moon’s visit but the event had been cancelled prior to the attack over an “unforeseen and urgent matter of state,” according to Moon’s office.

The Emirati Foreign Ministry did not immediately respond to a request for comment over Moon’s statement.

Fears over future attacks reaching the UAE, a major oil producer and OPEC member, helped push Brent crude oil prices to their highest level in seven years. On Tuesday, a barrel of Brent crude traded at over $87.50 a barrel, a price unseen since October 2014.

Although the UAE has largely withdrawn its own forces from Yemen, it is still actively engaged in the conflict and supports Yemeni militias fighting the Houthis.

The incident comes as the Houthis face pressure and are suffering heavy losses on the battlefields. Yemeni government forces, allied and backed by the UAE, have pushed back the rebels in key provinces. Aided by the Emirati-backed Giants Brigades, the government forces took back the province of Shabwa earlier this month in a blow to Houthi efforts to complete their control of the entire northern half of Yemen.

While Emirati troops have been killed over the course of the conflict, now in its eight year, the war has not directly affected daily life in the wider UAE, a country with a vast foreign workforce.

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Associated Press writers Isabel DeBre in Dubai, Samy Magdy in Cairo and Kim Tong-hyung in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this report.

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Follow Jon Gambrell on twitter at www.twitter.com/jongambrellAP.

Jon Gambrell, The Associated Press

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National

Grocery store closures loom amid labour, product shortages

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Grocery stores are struggling with rising labour and product shortages that could threaten Canada’s food security, experts say.

Employee absenteeism due to workers calling in sick and COVID-19 protocols has hit about 30 per cent at some stores and is continuing to rise, Gary Sands, senior vice-president of public policy with the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers, said Tuesday.

Without access to rapid testing in many provinces, he said workers are repeatedly forced to isolate for a week or more after an exposure to COVID-19.

If the situation worsens, some grocery stores won’t be able to stay open — threatening food security in rural and remote areas that rely on a sole independent grocer, Sands said.

“If we have to keep sending people home, at a certain point stores are not going to be able to operate,” he said. “We’re very frustrated with the lack of rapid test kits for grocers.”

Health Canada has made some rapid test kits available directly to companies in critical sectors, including the food industry, with 200 or more employees.

But many independent grocery stores don’t meet that threshold, putting those kits out of reach, Sands said.

Yet many grocers cannot obtain rapid tests through provinces either, he said.

“Independent grocers are in a myriad of communities in this country where there is no other grocery store,” Sands said. “If those stores close, you’ve got a food security issue.”

Meanwhile, stores are also experiencing a shortage of goods stemming from supply chain issues, including a shortage of truckers, packaging and processing delays and the Canadian winter.

Grocers rely on “just in time” delivery, meaning even transient issues like inclement weather can cause delays and shortages, Retail Council of Canada spokesperson Michelle Wasylyshen said.

Still, empty shelves at some supermarkets should only be temporary, she said, noting that retailers are exploring all avenues to get products to stores as quickly as possible.

But some supply chain issues could be longer lasting, such as the trucker shortage intensified by the federal government’s new vaccine mandate.

“The issue with the truckers having to be vaccinated is causing some delays, especially with the supply of fruit and vegetables from California,” Sands said.

“Grocers in Central Canada are mostly reporting just delays of a couple weeks, but in the West the shortages seem to be more significant.”

In some cases, Sands said grocers are short nearly 40 per cent of their usual stock of a variety of products.

“Especially in the West, some grocers are saying the situation is as bad as it was in the spring of 2020 in terms of supply,” he said.

It’s not just the produce aisle that experiencing shortages. Soups, cereals and cleaning supplies are all running lower than normal, Sands said.

Many shoppers have noticed empty shelves where Kellogg’s cereal is normally stocked, for example.

Kellogg Canada said in an emailed statement that higher at-home consumption coupled with supply chain challenges have impacted the availability of some products in Canada, such as Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal.

The company said the “intermittent shortages” reflect the challenging operating environment all manufacturers are experiencing, adding that it’s working hard to get Kellogg’s cereal brands back on store shelves.

About 1,400 union workers at Kellog’s plants in the United States were on strike for several weeks last year. An agreement was reached Dec. 21.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Jan. 18, 2022.

Brett Bundale, The Canadian Press

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