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Education

Kings Hockey receives multiple ACAC awards

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Red Deer, March 16, 2018 – The Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC) is pleased to announce Trevor Keeper of the Red Deer College Kings has been selected as the 2017-18 ACAC Men’s Hockey Coach of the Year. Two of his players have also been recognized for their outstanding achievements this season. Tanner Butler and Tyler Berkholtz have been named to the ACAC Men’s Hockey First All-Conference team.

Keeper, an instructor in RDC’s Kinesiology & Sport Studies department, has been the Head Coach of the RDC Kings since their return to ACAC competition in 2013-14 and has steadily built up the Kings Hockey program. This season, the Kings had 17 returning players and next season that number could jump to 21. Keeper led the RDC Kings to a 19-7-2-0 record this season and had his team near the top of the league in several categories. Along with 40 points and a third place finish in the regular season standings, the Kings had the second best penalty kill (90.5%) in the eight team league. Both their offensive output and goals against average ranked third in ACAC Men’s Hockey. This year, Keeper guided the Kings to the semi-finals.

“Trevor has been able to build a team which is very successful academically and athletically. Winning this award is representative of his five-year vision for Kings Hockey,” says Diane St-Denis, RDC Athletic Director. “It takes time to build a program, and being able to recruit and retain the student-athletes in ACAC Men’s Hockey is a big part of that.”

A pair of Keeper’s recruits, Tanner Butler and Tyler Berkholtz, have both made a positive impact with the Kings and were chosen as 2017-18 All-Conference selections.

Butler, the captain of the Kings, had an incredible season on the blueline. The fourth-year student- athlete contributed at both ends of the ice and recorded 12 goals and 21 assists while taking care of his defensive responsibilities. The smooth skating defenceman led by example all-season and was an integral member on the Kings’ special teams. The Kinesiology & Sport Studies student from Souris, Manitoba scored six power play goals and was a key player on the penalty kill. The former player for the Dauphin Kings added one game winning goal.

“I think that Tanner is the best two-way defenceman in the league. He led the d-men in scoring and finished fourth in league scoring. He is so good defensively, penalty killing and one-one-one,” says Keeper. “I think he is the ACAC version of a Nick Lidstrom type of defenceman. He is a quiet leader but he says the right things, and is very respected in the dressing room.”

Berkholtz was another important member of the RDC Kings this past season. The fifth-year student- athlete consistently brought a strong work ethic every game and was one of the heart-and-soul players wearing the crown. This year, the Management Certificate student from Penticton accumulated 16 goals and 22 assists which placed him second in league scoring. The assistant captain had five power play goals and two game winning goals while playing in all situations.

“Tyler has gotten better every year over the four years that he has been here,” says Keeper. “He is a competitor, never quits and always wants to win. He’s a mature player and he was a great leader for us.”

The awards were announced Friday, March 16 at the opening game of the ACAC Men’s Hockey finals.

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Education

Tale of two libraries: Edmonton design backlash morphs into rivalry with Calgary

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Edmonton Library construction

EDMONTON — The pitched reaction to Edmonton’s remodelled downtown library has morphed into the latest instalment of the city’s rivalry with its southern neighbour Calgary.

Renovations on the Stanley A. Milner Library have been going on for months, but this week Edmontonians took notice of the dark, angular, futuristic redesign.

Memes have surfaced online comparing the building to everything from a military tank to a cruise ship. Some have posted side-by-side photos of Calgary’s award-winning Central Library and its Edmonton counterpart.

Edmonton Public Library CEO Pilar Martinez said much of the online backlash against the redesign came as a shock to staff.

“We were dismayed, particularly given that the project has been underway for over 2 1/2 years and it has been in a similar state for several months,” Martinez said.

The building has been closed since 2016 and is not scheduled to reopen until next February.

“People need to give it some time before they make a final judgment on the appearance of the exterior.”

Much of the furor seems to stem from the difference between artist renderings released before construction and what people are seeing now.

Martinez said the project has undergone some changes. Renovations were initially budgeted at $62.5 million and increased to $84.5 million after asbestos was removed and the old building was brought up to code.

She also said it isn’t fair to compare Edmonton’s library with Calgary’s new building because both cities have different histories and municipal budgets.

At $245 million, Calgary Central Library cost almost triple that of the Edmonton renovations.

“Unlike Calgary, we were working within an existing structure,” Martinez said. “That brought with it having to work around pillars … and not being absolutely free in creating a space from scratch — and there are some advantages to that.

“We shouldn’t be pitted against each other.”

She’s hoping people will have a different reaction when the library reopens its doors.

“I hope people will give us a chance,” Martinez said. “They should experience it in its fullness, rather than what it looks like at the moment.”

Trevor Boddy, a Vancouver-based architecture critic, said the Edmonton library was designed from the inside out.

“What you have are these multi-levels of bridges and spaces to study, talk, walk and even have coffee with light streaming down from above,” said Boddy, who grew up in Edmonton.

“I think it will be the first building of the 21st century in downtown Edmonton — and good on them.”

He noted that Toronto-based architect Stephen Teeple, who designed the building, also designed the Clareview recreation centre in northeast Edmonton and the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum outside Grande Prairie, Alta.

Teeple Architects did not respond to a request for comment.

Historically, Edmonton has had a more advanced art and architecture scene, Boddy said,  but in the last couple of decades Calgary has surged ahead because the city has more money and a larger community of designers.

“There always has been a rivalry and always will be,” he said. “I don’t necessarily think it is a bad thing.”

Boddy pointed out that the new Calgary library was not well received before it opened late last year.

Many questioned whether it would be viable to have light-rail transit run below it, and the building was also compared to an ocean liner.

“To me, controversy around a new building is usually a sign that something has gone right, not wrong,” Boddy said.

“That’s because they are doing something unusual, innovative or groundbreaking that catches the eye, which might scare people or confuse people, but then they go on to be much loved.”

Daniela Germano, The Canadian Press

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Education

Manitoba university cuts ties with Ebola researcher pending RCMP investigation

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Manitoba university severs ties with researcher escorted off premesis

WINNIPEG — The University of Manitoba says it has cut ties with an Ebola vaccine researcher pending the results of an RCMP investigation.

A spokesperson says the school is ending the non-salaried adjunct appointments of Dr. Xiangguo Qiu and her husband Keding Cheng.

Qiu, a renowned virologist who received her original medical training in China, helped develop a vaccine for the Ebola virus at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

Cheng also worked at the lab as a researcher.

The Public Health Agency of Canada said on Monday that it was taking steps to address an “administrative matter” at the lab after it advised the Mounties of possible policy breaches.

The laboratory is Canada’s highest-security infectious disease research facility dealing with deadly contagious germs.

Public Health said there is no risk to the public and the work of the lab continues.

The Canadian Press has been unable to reach Qiu or Cheng for comment.

The RCMP in Manitoba has confirmed it received a referral from the health agency, but has not confirmed whether Qui or Cheng is being investigated.

The Canadian Press

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