Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Health

Had a Concussion? Are you improving?

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • Recently, our therapists attended a course regarding concussion.  This course was different, because while it talked about people getting headaches and dizziness with concussions, it identified that some of the symptoms you may be experiencing may not be a result of the concussion itself, but caused by dysfunction of the neck.

    As you probably know, a concussion is the result of a direct blow to the head. The impact creating a concussion also affects the neck-creating a neck strain, and possibly joint mobility changes in the neck.  So as the brain heals from the concussion, you may continue to have symptoms.  It is common to have dizziness, headaches, and balance changes that are caused from neck associated disorders.  Of the people who continue to have concussion symptoms after the initial phase (14 days for adults, or up to 4 weeks for kids) 71% complain of headaches, and 34% complain of dizziness.  These both could be caused from the neck, and the dizziness could also be caused from a dysfunction of the vestibular system.

    The signs and symptoms of an acute concussion may come on over 24 to 48 hours following impact to the head.  These can include amnesia, headache, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, drowsiness, sleep disturbances, balance disruptions, confusion, “foggy” feeling, reduced concentration, slow reaction time, irritability, anxiety, depression, being more emotional than usual.  It is common to get a few of these symptoms, but one person is unlikely to experience all of them.

    If you experience a concussion, you would benefit from seeing physiotherapist for an assessment and early advice for healing.  They will also be able to help you with keeping your recovery on track.  Our therapists are experts in manual therapy to treat the changed muscle strength and joint mobility in the neck.  We have a therapist trained in assessing and treating the vestibular system if your dizziness continues.  Keep us in mind the next time you or someone you know experience a concussion.

    Posted by: Leanne Schlachter, Pursuit Physiotherapy.

    Click here to learn more about Pursuit Physiotherapy.

     


    If you like this, share it!

    Health

    Examine ‘monstrous’ allegations of forced sterilization of Indigenous women: NDP

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — The federal government and the provinces must examine “monstrous” allegations of modern-day forced sterilizations of Indigenous women, NDP reconciliation critic Romeo Saganash said Monday before he pressed for answers in the House of Commons.

    Coerced sterilization clearly breaches human-rights standards that Canada must fight to uphold, Saganash in an interview Monday, and said that authorities should very carefully read Article 2 of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide adopted by the UN in 1948.

    That international agreement says that “genocide” includes any acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnic, racial or religious group, such as by “imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group.”

    Canadians should not tolerate allegations of forced sterilization in their country, Saganash said, and Ottawa must address the issue as victims share their stories.

    “I think they have to take this seriously,” said the Cree lawyer and MP from northern Quebec. “Just the fact that it is happening and people are coming out makes it serious enough to look for a solution.”

    The issue of forced sterilizations will also be raised at the UN Committee Against Torture this week, when Amnesty International Canada and a national law firm call for accountability for the practice.

    Maurice Law is leading a proposed class-action lawsuit against the federal government, the government of Saskatchewan, all its health authorities, and individual medical professionals.

    The lawsuit was launched in 2017 by two affected women in the Saskatoon Health Region who each claimed $7 million in damages. Now about 60 women are part of the lawsuit.

    An additional 32 women have come forward to report they were sterilized without consent since The Canadian Press first published a story last Sunday, associate Alisa Lombard said Monday, noting the women are mostly from Saskatchewan but elsewhere as well.

    In its submission to the UN committee, Maurice Law said there has been no effort at a comprehensive review to understand the scale of the problem or the conditions that make forced sterilizations possible.

    It also listed a number of solutions, including a proposal to specifically criminalize forced sterilization as the “single most effective, immediate and enduring measure that could be taken” to protect women from this practice.

    The Liberal government has not indicated it is looking at this step.

    During question period on Monday, Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott said the Liberal government knows coerced sterilization is a gross violation of human rights and of reproductive rights. 

    The federal government is actively working with provinces and faculties of medicine to ensure safe and culturally appropriate health care is available across the country, she added.

    “This is not something that any one order of government can address alone,” Philpott said. “All Canadians have a responsibility to ensure that these practices never happen again.”

    For its part, Amnesty International Canada has recommended the federal government appoint a special representative to examine the prevalence of the practice.

    Yvonne Boyer, a Metis senator for Ontario, has welcomed this recommendation. She’s said that tubal ligations carried out on unwilling Indigenous women constitute one of the “most heinous” practices in health care in Canada.

    Assembly of First Nations National Chief Perry Bellegarde also wants to see the scope of forced sterilization examined and called the practice wrong, immoral and a gross human-rights violation.

    —Follow @kkirkup on Twitter

    Kristy Kirkup, The Canadian Press



    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Health

    Data suggests violence rising in Winnipeg remand jail; union says meth a factor

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • WINNIPEG — Newly obtained statistics point to increasing violence at the Winnipeg Remand Centre and the union that represents correctional workers says methamphetamine use is a major factor. 

    “Our members actually believe that some of the incidents are definitely fuelled by drugs such as meth,” said Michelle Gawronsky, president of the Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union.

    “They know that meth is an issue, that it lingers in the inmate.”

    Records obtained by The Canadian Press under the province’s freedom-of-information law show remand centre guards called for backup 47 times between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30 this year. That’s already higher than any full-year numbers reported in the previous five years for which statistics were provided and more than double the number in 2014.

    There were another 20 cases in the first nine months of this year in which a corrections officer issued a more serious call of being in immediate danger. That figure is on track, by the end of 2018, to be the highest in recent years.

    One worker at the remand centre, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to publicly discuss matters inside the jail, said inmates on meth are unpredictable and can become violent suddenly.

    “You’re dealing with zombies, for lack of a better word,” the worker told The Canadian Press.

    “An alcoholic is usually slow. They’re sluggish. But an inmate who’s on meth … in my opinion they have increased strength.”

    The 300-bed remand centre is normally the first stop for people after they are arrested until they are granted bail or transferred to another jail. Because the effects of meth can last much longer than those of other drugs, inmates can be under its influence long after they enter the facility, the worker said.

    The worker said one inmate at the remand centre was on meth and appeared to settle down, but then erupted in violence when cell doors were opened.

    “He came out of his cell and proceeded directly into another cell … and with a (homemade) weapon, started attacking both of the guys who were sleeping.”

    Gawronsky said the union has raised the issue with Justice Minister Cliff Cullen and is hoping to have jail staff receive more training.

    The Justice Department would not comment on security issues inside the remand centre. Cullen, who was out of the province much of last week meeting with other provincial justice ministers, issued a brief written statement.

    “Correctional centres can be volatile environments and Manitoba Justice is committed to working with staff and the (union) to manage offenders with a variety of needs, including addictions to methamphetamine and other substances,” he said in the statement.

    The John Howard Society of Canada, a prisoners rights group, said rising meth problems in jails should come as no surprise, given that police forces in Winnipeg and other cities have noticed an increase in the drug’s use.

    John Hutton, the group’s executive director in Manitoba, said the problem needs to be addressed before people end up behind bars.

    “The facilities weren’t built with detoxification units and it’s a challenge,” Hutton said.

    “I don’t think anyone would disagree we need more resources in the community for people to get treatment for meth addiction before they end up in custody.”

    Steve Lambert, The Canadian Press




    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    november, 2018

    thu11oct - 29novoct 115:45 pmnov 29Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) - CMHA(october 11) 5:45 pm - (november 29) 8:15 pm

    wed21nov5:30 pm- 11:00 pmFestival of Trees Preview Dinner5:30 pm - 11:00 pm

    thu22nov11:30 am- 1:30 pmFestival of Trees Business LunchFestival of Trees11:30 am - 1:30 pm

    thu22nov6:00 pm- 9:00 pmFestival of Trees Taste of Red DeerFestival of Trees6:00 pm - 9:00 pm

    fri23nov10:30 am- 1:30 pmFestival of Trees Fashion BrunchFashion Brunch10:30 am - 1:30 pm

    sat24nov10:00 am- 4:00 pmParkland Garden Centre Craft and Market Sale10:00 am - 4:00 pm

    sat24nov6:00 pm- 11:00 pmMistletoe MagicFestival of Trees6:00 pm - 11:00 pm

    sun25nov9:00 am- 12:00 pmBreakfast with SantaFestival of Trees9:00 am - 12:00 pm

    fri30nov - 1decnov 303:00 pmdec 1- 4:00 pmWesterner Park Christmas Artisan Market3:00 pm - (december 1) 4:00 pm

    Trending

    X