Connect with us
[the_ad id="89560"]

Alberta

Why We Remember

Published

3 minute read

Why we remember 

To remember not only the fallen, but the sacrifices made by the living who have experienced horrors which are simply beyond the comprehension of the unindoctrinated. 

To acknowledge the sacrifice made by the families of the fallen, and of all those who have served and who are still serving. 

Because nobody ever truly comes home from war. Only a version of yourself returns. A haunted version, whose very soul has been irreversibly stained by the realization that Satan is in fact real, and he does indeed cajole decent people into doing awful things.

It’s the understanding of how unspeakably horrible one person can be to another. War forever taints you. Witnessing a flagrant disregard for the sanctity of life is not something you can unsee. It is this stain which affects every aspect of your civilian life, often for the rest of your life. 

We remember our soldiers because they bear a terrible burden, so that others will never have to carry the painful weight of freedom.

To acknowledge the privilege we enjoy, of living in a peaceful country where our children can safely walk to school without the fear of their school being bombed. 

We remember, because we acknowledge that we can’t ever fully appreciate the sacrifices, so we remember in lieu of understanding. 

We remember, because it’s the best we can do, and the least we should do to honor our soldiers, sailors, and airmen both past and present. 

We remember, because they likely know the unforgettable stench of burning human flesh, and the sound of the screams of the burning. 

We remember them, because they can not forget. 

We remember, because the survivors often struggle from debilitating depression, relentless nightmares, and uncontrollable anger. 

We remember because veterans are at a much higher risk of suicide. 

We remember them, because many of them can never find peace.

We remember them, because we don’t carry the burden of becoming them. 

On November the 11th, we will remove our hats, stand for our two minutes of silence, and we will remember them. 


Mark E. Meincke
Veteran
Host of: Operation Tango Romeo, the trauma recovery podcast 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Jacob Markstrom earns shutout as Flames blank Oilers 5-0 in Battle of Alberta

Published on

CALGARY — Jacob Markstrom stopped all 17 shots he faced and the Calgary Flames put an end to their four-game losing skid with a commanding 5-0 victory over the Edmonton Oilers on Saturday.

Johnny Gaudreau and captain Mark Giordano each had a goal and an assist, while Sean Monahan, Elias Lindholm and Brett Ritchie also scored for Calgary (17-21-3). Sam Bennett and Mikael Backlund each tallied a pair of helpers.

The Flames improved to 3-5 against their provincial rivals this season.

Playing their fourth game in six nights, the Oilers (25-15-2) were blanked for only the third time this year. They dropped to third in the North Division — seven points behind the Toronto Maple Leafs and one point behind the Winnipeg Jets.

Goalie Mike Smith stopped 27-of-32 shots in defeat, Edmonton’s second regulation loss in its last 11 outings.

A tentative first 20 minutes of play saw the teams withdraw to the dressing room with a 0-0 tie.

But the Calgary Flames exploded for four goals on 10 shots in the second period from four different shooters.

Monahan got the barrage going with his first since Mar. 13, snapping a 13-game goalless drought. Alone at the side of the net, he capitalized on a defensive mix-up from the Oilers and converted Andrew Mangiapane’s pass at 3:12.

Calgary gained in confidence as the period progressed. They kept the pressure on and it paid off at 10:43 when Gaudreau took a perfect pass across the crease from Noah Hanifin to beat Smith over the glove from a tight angle.

The Flames were again rewarded for good puck movement when Lindholm netted his 10th of the season, five-hole on Smith on the power play. The big-bodied Milan Lucic got the play started and later screened Smith in the crease.

The captain got in on the second period’s deluge of goals. Coming off the bench and storming into the offensive zone, Giordano called for a pass and fired from the right face-off dot, beating Smith between the pads.

Calgary limited Edmonton to very few high-danger chances. Connor McDavid ended the game with one shot.

The Oilers upped the pressure in the third period but could not solve Markstrom. Tyson Barrie came closest when he fired a puck off the post.

Ritchie padded the lead and made it 5-0 with 6:30 left in the game.

There was some confusion shortly after puck drop, possibly related to the Oilers’ lineup card, as Calgary coach Darryl Sutter chatted with officials from behind the bench.

The Flames are back in action in Toronto on Tuesday. The Oilers are off until Friday when they face the Canucks in Vancouver’s first game since their COVID-19 outbreak.

Notes: Edmonton held a ceremony to honour the late Colby Cave earlier Saturday. The 25-year-old Oilers forward died last April after doctors discovered a cyst in his brain. … Mangiapane and Bennett extended their point streaks to four games. … The Oilers placed 27-year-old centre Ryan Nugent-Hopkins (upper body) on the injured-reserve list earlier Saturday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 11, 2021.

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Alberta

Edmonton Oilers place centre Ryan Nugent-Hopkins on injured list

Published on

EDMONTON — The Edmonton Oilers have placed Ryan Nugent-Hopkins on the injured-reserve list. 

The 27-year-old centre missed Edmonton’s game against the Ottawa Senators Thursday with an upper-body injury. 

Nugent-Hopkins is fifth on the team in scoring with 28 points (12 goals and 16 assists) in 40 games. 

Edmonton has recalled forwards Tyler Ennis and James Neal to the active roster. 

The Oilers (25-14-2) sit second in the North Division, five points behind the Toronto Maple Leafs. 

Edmonton is set to face the Flames in Calgary on Saturday. 

This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 10, 2021. 

The Canadian Press

Continue Reading

Trending

X