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Calgary

Why The News Is Fake, And Liberals Rely On Racism

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8 minute read

Love him or hate him, President Trump has woken the masses to the truth that the news is often inaccurate, and occasionally blatantly false.  When called out, reporters wail in their feeble response, “It was an honest mistake, and we retracted it!”  The truth is, the news media have little interest in being accurate or unbiased, instead their goal is to procure ratings for the purpose of receiving advertising revenue. Profit is their master. 

By analyzing data from Google and Youtube, we now know scientifically what we have always assumed anecdotally, “If it bleeds, it leads”.  Violence and catastrophe has always been the driving factor in editorial decision making. As a result, mildly unfortunate events are made to  appear as if they are massive catastrophe’s and in the absence of a convenient cataclysm, shocking events are occasionally staged.  The news is not “reporting the facts”, it’s info-tainment.  The news NEEDS you to be either outraged or terrified in order for you to tune in and consume the media.  If you don’t consume…then they don’t have a business model.  Keeping you angry and afraid is how they make money, which is why they will assassinate the character of anyone who dares to contradict their story line. They have to attack in order to survive. 

State sponsored news such as RT, or the CBC are not any better. In addition to catering to their advertisers, they also have to appease the governments who fund them.  If either Putin or Trudeau need help from their state run broadcasters, …they get it. Media CEO’s know who butters their bread, and they know how to keep their high paid cushy jobs.  If you’re looking to the news for the truth, you’re looking in the wrong place. 

Mainstream media is dying.  The information monopoly which provides the media with breath is being choked to death by the free flow of information on the internet. No longer do people rely on being force fed their information by those with questionable motives. Instead, we all have alternative sources available in abundance. 

Podcasts, and independent news commentators have supplanted the paternalistic talking heads we are accustomed to seeing, anchoring the evening news.  VIA the internet, sagely voices from the wilderness have found their way to the mountain tops to expound their wisdom to eager ears, which has the media backed into a corner and fighting for it’s life. 

And now for the rest of the headline…

Those with aligned goals tend to be friends.  If I help you, and you help me…then our symbiotic relationship is something that we will both endeavor to protect at all costs. The media and leftest politicians coexist with such a relationship. 

Leftist identity politics is a one-trick pony which relies on outrage for it’s very existence.  Their brand identity is steeped in the fight against racism and inequality. Though it has a noble face, this strategy wasn’t born out of altruism.  Liberal politicians recognized long ago that if they could be seen as avengers of civil rights, that they could win a lot of votes…and until recently, the strategy has worked quite well.

Racism in North America has been on a dramatic decline since the late 1980’s.  Racist jokes which were once acceptable to share around the campfire, or in the locker room are now received with shock and disdain…and rightly so.  Could you imagine if the Brocket 99 Cassette tape was made today?  The backlash would be immense, the creators would be publicly flogged, and the news would be covered globally. Racist parody is no longer tolerated, and minstrel shows are extinct.  As society has progressed, leftist politicians have lost leverage.  Now that racism has been largely eradicated…what possible strategy could the leftist parties possibly use to retain their power?  Far left politicians NEED racism to be a problem so that they can be the hero’s, so where there is a vacuum, they will find a way to fill it. 

Bigotry, misogyny and homophobia are all unacceptable anymore, as they should be. This however has created a big problem for politicians whose entire political platforms have been branded as being the saviors of the oppressed, so as these issues became less prevalent, climate change has helped to fill the void.  Once again, a valid issue is being used not because of a sense of environmental responsibility, but instead because there needs to be a boogeyman under the bed.  But still, the cries of racism ring out across the land at the slightest provocation.  

Of course racism is still an issue of sorts, but it’s nothing like it was fifty years ago, and to pretend otherwise is a slap in the face to all those who have suffered through the horrors of it. 

Racism is an issue today, because liberal politicians and the media need it to be a problem.  Both fuel the flames of hatred and division, then blame conservatives as the propagators as is seen in example after example.  Fortunately people are waking up to the fact that most news is nothing more than lefitst propaganda.  #Blexit, and #walkaway are gaining steam, and the liberal grip on our society is starting to slip, which they find terrifying. 

To fight back, riots have been encouraged, and even indirectly funded by the Democratic party, all in an attempt to destabilize society, and claw back their power and influence.  There are no lengths they will not stoop to in order to regain control, and the media is largely in lock-step. 

Before you decide to attend a protest, or throw a brick in a riot, ask yourself who it is that you are actually fighting for.  Chances are, your fighting for the wrong people without knowing it.

Mark Meincke
403-463-4313

This article was originally published on June 26, 2020.

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Alberta

Exercise in ‘patience’ pays off for Kadri, says winning a factor in joining Flames

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By David Alter

Nazem Kadri said the Calgary Flames expressed interest the moment he became an unrestricted free agent, but it was an “elaborate process” before he finally signed on the dotted line on Thursday.

“The patience definitely did me some good,” Kadri told reporters in a Zoom call Friday. “There were some decisions to be made.”

The Flames’ wild off-season took another dramatic turn Thursday when the team signed the coveted free agent to a seven-year, US$49-million deal.

Before the deal could be made official, Calgary sent forward Sean Monahan and a conditional 2025 first-round pick to the Montreal Canadiens for future considerations in a move to create salary cap space for Kadri’s contract.

“That’s part of the reason why it’s been taking so long,” Kadri said from Paris, where he is on vacation.

The 32-year-old Kadri was one of the biggest names available in free agency after an all-star season with Colorado that ended with the Avalanche winning the Stanley Cup.

The benefits of returning to Canada, where his NHL career started, and taking part in the ‘Battle of Alberta’ with the provincial-rival Edmonton Oilers were benefits to signing with the Flames, but what ultimately led him to sign was how close he feels the team is to winning a Stanley Cup.

“Ultimately, it’s about winning and that played a huge factor in me coming to Calgary,” Kadri said. “The time is now and it certainly can be close with the moves we’ve made and me hopping on board.”

The 31-year-old Kadri had 87 points (28 goals, 59 assists) in 71 games for the Avalanche in 2021-22. He added 15 points in 16 playoff games, including the overtime winner in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup final against Tampa Bay.

That was his return to action after being injured in Game 3 of the Western Conference final after being hit from behind by Edmonton forward Evander Kane.

Kadri’s addition capped a wild off-season for the Flames that saw star forward Johnny Gaudreau walk away in free agency.

The Flames’ leading scorer last season (115 points), and a finalist for the Hart Trophy as league MVP, Gaudreau informed the Flames before the start of the free agency period that we would not be re-signing with the Flames in a desire to move closer to home.

The New Jersey native signed a seven-year, $68.25-million contract with the Columbus Blue Jackets when free agency opened on July 13,.

Calgary was then informed that forward Matthew Tkachuk, who had a breakout season with 42 goals and 104 points, would not sign a contract extension after the upcoming season.

What looked like a potential nightmare for Calgary started to turn around when the Flames dealt Tkachuk to Florida for a package that included forward Jonathan Huberdeau, who had 115 points last season, and defenceman Mackenzie Weegar.

The Flames then locked up Huberdeau long-term with an eight-year, $84-million contract extension.

“It’s alarming to anybody when you lose players of that magnitude,” Kadri said. “But I think Brad (Flames GM Brad Treliving) has done a great job getting some return and valuable players.”

This is not the first time the Flames have tried to add Kadri to their roster. The Flames attempted to acquire him from the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2019, but Kadri used the no-trade clause in his contract to veto the deal. Kadri was then traded to the Avalanche on July 1, 2019.

“I didn’t see myself leaving (Toronto),” Kadri said about the situation. “That had nothing to do with the city of Calgary or the organization, I just wanted to stay where I was.

“It’s important for me to clarify that. I think it’s important because I’ve always admired the city of Calgary and Canada in general. I’m a Canadian boy. I love playing in Canada but it’s certainly ironic, but it was always a team that was on my radar.”

Kadri was selected seventh overall by Toronto in the 2009 NHL draft and has 512 points (219 goals, 293 assists) in 739 career games with the Maple Leafs and Colorado.

The London, Ontario native has yet to have his day with the Stanley Cup, but his plans include taking it to his hometown.

He also said he’s going to bring it to Toronto, where he spent his first eight NHL seasons.

“I’ve done a lot of growing up in that city as well and there’s been lots of supports of mine there,” he said.
This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 19, 2022.

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Alberta

Reports: Flames closing in on signing UFA forward Nazem Kadri

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The Calgary Flames are closing in on a deal to sign unrestricted free agent Nazem Kadri, according to multiple media reports.

Sportsnet reported the deal is for seven years at US$7 million per season.

The Flames, according to Sportsnet and TSN, are moving forward Sean Monahan to the Montreal Canadiens to create salary cap space for Kadri’s contract. Details of that trade have not been released.

The 32-year-old Kadri was one of the biggest names available in free agency after an All-Star season with Colorado that ended with the Avalanche winning the Stanley Cup.

Kadri had 87 points (28 goals, 59 assists) in 71 games for the Avalanche in 2021-22.

He added 15 points (seven goals, eight assists) in 16 playoff games, including the overtime winner in Game 4 of the Stanley Cup final against Tampa Bay. That was his return to action after being injured in Game 3 of the Western Conference final after being hit from behind by Edmonton forward Evander Kane.

Kadri’s signing would be the latest chapter of a chaotic off-season for the Flames.

Calgary lost leading scorer and Hart Trophy candidate Johnny Gaudreau to the Columbus Blue Jackets early in free agency, then was informed that star forward Matt Tkachuk would not sign a contract extension after the upcoming season.

The Flames dealt Tkachuk to Florida for a package that included forward Jonathan Huberdeau, who had 115 points last season, and defenceman Mackenzie Weegar.

The Flames then locked up Huberdeau long-term with an eight-year, US$84-million contract extension.

Monahan, selected sixth overall by the Flames in the 2013 NHL Entry Draft, has played nine seasons in Calgary. The three-time 30-goal scorer tallied just eight goals and 15 assists for 23 points in 65 games last season.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 18, 222.

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