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Alberta

This is how a Local Musician is giving back to her Community

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Kate Stevens is a local Calgarian and Bishop Carroll High School Alumni making a splash in the Canadian music industry with her original music and community investment initiatives. A talented singer-songwriter, she plays the ukulele, piano and guitar and writes all of her own music. 

Growing up in a musical household, Kate’s passion for music began at an early age and stayed with her all through her school years, eventually landing her in the music program at Bishop Carroll High School in Southwest Calgary. The education structure at BCHS allowed Kate to focus strongly on her love of music and develop as a young artist, impressively recording an entire studio album during her senior year. She also sang in choir and vocal jazz groups, building lasting connections within her high school and across the Calgary music community. 

Just 20 years old, Kate graduated from BCHS in 2017, the same year she released her debut EP, Handmade Rumors. Since graduation, things have been crazy for Kate. From bringing home YYC Music Awards Female Artist of the Year in 2018 to 4 nominations at the 2019 YYC Music Awards, releasing another single and launching the Youth Musicians of Music Mile Alliance (YOMOMMA) to help nurture young musicians in Calgary, busy is an understatement. However, despite her exciting rise and packed schedule, Kate remains deeply invested in her community, and recently launched a new initiative to give back to the BCHS program that helped her get her own start. Using funds from a recent licensing agreement for one of her songs, she has elected to sponsor an annual scholarship for a BCHS vocal student in their final year. 

“I was lucky to attend Bishop Carroll High School, “says Kate, “the incredible music program there helped me to develop as an artist, and I would like to give financial support to future musicians.” At $250 dollars a year, the scholarship will be awarded by the BCHS Choir Director to a student who shows exemplary leadership skills and wants to pursue music after graduation. Having been on the receiving end of scholarships throughout her own high school career, Kate is aware of the positive impact these types of grants can have on the lives of developing youth, and wanted to be a part of the process that helps young musicians chase their dreams. “If I can support someone in this industry and really encourage the idea that music is important, then I’ve done my job.” 

Currently, all of Kate’s upcoming performances have been cancelled as a result of COVID-19. Although she misses interacting with crowds and performing on stage, she remains optimistic and excited for the future. To hear her music and read more about her story, visit https://www.katestevensmusic.com.

Check out WeMaple video in partnership with Calgary Arts Development featuring Kate Stevens here.

 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary.

Alberta

Good Earth Cafes unveils strategy to move in when Starbucks closes Canadian shops

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CALGARY — The founder and CEO of Good Earth Cafes Ltd. says the Calgary-based chain could potentially double its 45 locations across Canada through a program to take over coffee shops being closed down by international chains such as Starbucks.

In January, Seattle-based Starbucks said it would complete its plan to close up to 300 coffee shops across Canada by the end of March as part of a “transformation strategy” to respond to changes in consumer habits during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Michael Going of Good Earth says his company is already looking at potential sites to be redeveloped and is recruiting partners for multi-unit franchises as well as single unit owner operators.

Good Earth says it has hired Stan Boniferro of Stabon Enterprises to work with landlords and developers in identifying sites with proven performance, infrastructure and good growth prospects.

The first Good Earth shop opened in Calgary in 1991. The chain says it aims to offer ethically sourced coffee and fresh food while promoting community interaction and environmental responsibility.

Going says franchisees would cover the cost of renovating the former Starbucks to match Good Earth’s theme and design. He declined to give a specific target number for Good Earth’s program.

“We’re not going to take 300. First of all, there’s not 300 good locations they’re leaving behind,” said Going.

“We could double the number of locations we have now in a couple of years time.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Feb. 3, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Kerri Einarson, Brad Gushue team up for national mixed doubles championship

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CALGARY — If there’s an upside to Kerri Einarson not having a women’s world curling championship to play in this month, it’s the chance to win another Canadian championship.

Einarson and reigning Canadian men’s champion skip Brad Gushue were among the 35 duos named Tuesday to the national mixed doubles championship.

The March 18-25 tournament will be the third of four Curling Canada events held in a spectator-free, controlled environment in Calgary to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

Einarson, third Val Sweeting, second Shannon Birchard and lead Briane Meilleur, who claimed a second straight national women’s title Sunday, will return to Calgary to team up with male partners for mixed doubles.

While Einarson and company would have preferred representing Canada on the world stage March 20-28 in Schaffhausen, Switzerland, mixed doubles offers the chance to at least keep curling.

When the World Curling Federation called off the women’s championship Feb. 8, Einarson said she sent Gushue a tongue-in-cheek text saying “well, good news, I guess the worlds is cancelled so I guess I’m playing mixed doubles.”

Gushue and several other men curling in the national championship, starting Friday at WinSport’s Markin MacPhail Centre, will stay on in Calgary for $150,000 Home Hardware Mixed Doubles Curling Championship.

The mixed doubles field also includes two-time national champions Brett Gallant, who is Gushue’s second, and Jocelyn Peterman, as well as 2014 Olympic women’s curling champion skip Jennifer Jones and her husband Brett Laing.

John Morris, who won Olympic mixed doubles gold with Kaitlyn Lawes in 2018, replaced partner Rachel Homan with Danielle Schmiemann because Homan is just weeks away from giving birth.

The top 12 teams emerging from five pools advance to playoffs. 

The winner earns $50,000 in prize money and represents Canada in the 2021 world mixed doubles championship, if there is one. The World Curling Federation has yet to announce a date and location.

The world championship would determine seven of the 10 countries competing in mixed doubles in the 2022 Winter Olympics in Beijing.

The pandemic wiping out the majority of the curling season posed qualification challenges for mixed doubles as it did for the Scotties Tournament of Hearts and Tim Hortons Brier.

Fourteen pairs are provincial or territorial champions and another 14 gained entry via Curling Canada’s mixed doubles rankings based on their results between March 2019 and March 2020.

The latter group of 14 had to play a minimum of two mixed doubles events during that time frame. 

The seven other teams in the field didn’t compete this season because of the pandemic, but had declared to Curling Canada their intention to curl mixed doubles in 2020-21.

They qualified via a ranking system based on each athlete’s top three results with their four-player teams, combined with their partner’s, in 2019-20. 

Gushue and Einarson were among those seven whose ranking under that criteria placed them fifth.

Curling Canada wants to keep mixed doubles options open for the country’s top curlers who spend the majority of their competitive seasons with their four-player teams.

Morris and Lawes had played only a handful of games together before winning Olympic gold in 2018.

Two-time national women’s champion skip Chelsea Carey and Colin Hodgson, who plays lead for Mike McEwen, objected Tuesday on social media about their exclusion from the field.

Curling Canada responded that they didn’t play mixed doubles together in the 2019-20 time frame, nor did they rank high enough to be among the seven. Carey and Hodgson ranked 10th.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 2, 2021.

Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press

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