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Edmonton

Hiring! Attend a “Women in Policing” Career Presentation in YEG

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The RCMP is looking for motivated and dedicated women to join the team. Learn how you can be part of Canada’s national police force at a special recruiting presentation for women.

From Constable to Commissioner, anything is possible for the proud and dedicated women who serve in this historic organization. Since 1974, women have made significant contributions as RCMP officers in every part of Canada and around the world. They have a positive impact on the community while enjoying vast opportunities for growth and development in dozens of specialized units.

At present, 21.5% of RCMP police officers are women. The RCMP is committed to increasing the number of female officers to 30% to better represent the communities we serve across the country.

A “Women in Policing” Career Presentation is a unique opportunity to meet with recruiters and hear real life career experiences from female police officers who are proud to wear the RCMP uniform. A recruiting officer will also outline the process to apply, the benefits and rewards of a career in policing, provide advice and answer questions. The presentation is on:

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018, 1830 HRS

RCMP Edmonton K Division

11140 – 109 Street, Edmonton, Alberta

The RCMP is looking for people from across the country to join Canada’s national police service. If you or someone you know is thinking about becoming a police officer with the RCMP, visit rcmpcareers.ca.

Quick Facts

  • Competitive salary and benefits: RCMP police officers have great salary potential and standard force benefits include medical, dental, and life insurance, and the best maternity and parental allowances in the country.
  • Guaranteed employment after graduation: Once you’ve graduated from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Academy, you immediately start your career in General Duty Policing.
  • Over 150 career specializations: After only three years of General Duty Policing, you can explore a vast range of specialized career paths.
  • Paid cadet training: Cadets at the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Training Academy receive paid training from their very first day.
  • Travel and development opportunities: You will begin your career by working in Canada and may have the opportunity to work abroad in Foreign Missions, or in specializations ranging from Forensics to Cybercrime Intelligence.
  • Pre-Posting: To meet organizational needs, applicants from British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan or Manitoba will have the opportunity to select their home province for their first post following graduation. The RCMP’s operational needs will continue to determine the exact location of a posting. Applicants willing to relocate anywhere within Canada will still have that option and their relocation will also be based on organizational needs.

Quotes

“A career with the RCMP offers the chance to have a daily positive impact on Canadian communities.

Female and male police officers bring different perspectives to policing that provide a balanced approach to resolving problems and developing relationships with the communities we serve. We believe that the more diverse we are when it comes to gender, ethnic background, religion or sexual orientation, the better we are able to serve all Canadians.

The RCMP has been keeping communities safe since 1873. To do our job, we need highly motivated team players who possess strong leadership abilities from a wide range of backgrounds. A uniform with your name on it is waiting for you.”

—     Constable Penelope GAVIN, Royal Canadian Mounted Police

City of Edmonton

Edmonton’s Single-Use Item Reduction Bylaw to ban plastic shopping bags, force restaurants to serve in reusable cups and accept customer cups

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News release submitted by the City of Edmonton

City council passes bylaw to significantly reduce waste

The City of Edmonton is taking action to decrease the use of single-use items, which will help reduce the amount of waste being littered and ending up in landfills.
“This is an exciting first step towards climate resiliency. We’re beginning to change our course,” said Mayor Amarjeet Sohi. “We all have a part to play in preserving and protecting our environment, and participating in single-use item reduction is an easy way for all Edmontonians to commit to sustainability. I am supportive of this bylaw and know that together, we can build a greener and more climate-resilient future for all of us.”
On October 4, Council approved the Single-use Item Reduction Bylaw, which will go into effect on July 1, 2023. The bylaw aims to reduce waste by targeting items that can easily be avoided or replaced with reusable options, and by making those reusable options more accessible.
Edmontonians will see the following changes:
  • Single-use plastic shopping bags will be banned, and businesses must charge at least 15 cents for a paper bag and at least $1 for a new reusable shopping bag.
  • These minimum fees will increase on July 1, 2024 to 25 cents for a paper bag and $2 for a new reusable bag.
  • Styrofoam (foam) plates, cups and containers will be banned.
  • Restaurants must serve dine-in drink orders in reusable cups, and accept reusable customer cups for dine-in and takeout orders.
  • Accessories (like utensils, straws, pre-packaged condiments and napkins) will only be available by request or self-serve.
Approximately 450 million single-use items are thrown in the garbage each year in Edmonton, plus more that are recycled and littered. Through these measures, the City aims to reduce the number of regulated single-use items used in Edmonton by 20 per cent by 2027.
“Our goal is to reduce single-use items overall, not just to switch from plastic items to non-plastic items,” said Denis Jubinville, Branch Manager of Waste Services. “In addition to diverting more waste from landfill, this bylaw will also help residents think more broadly about waste reduction.
“Something as simple as bringing a reusable cup to a coffee shop may feel like a small step, but when a city of a million residents commits to small behaviour changes, the impact can be significant.”
The City will ensure businesses are well informed and supported through awareness campaigns and various resources, including plain-language guidelines for implementing the changes and customer communication tools.
The bylaw exempts registered charitable organizations, to ensure they’re able to maintain their focus on providing critical social services. Some types of businesses are also currently exempt from portions of the bylaw for safety or feasibility reasons.
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Alberta

Edmonton police use DNA phenotyping to find sex assault suspect

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By Angela Amato in Edmonton

Edmonton police say they are using DNA phenotyping, for the first time in its history, in trying to solve a sexual assault.

DNA phenotyping predicts physical appearance and ancestry from unidentified DNA evidence, and police use that information to narrow suspects and generate leads in criminal investigations.

Det. Colleen Maynes says the method is a last resort after all other investigative avenues have been exhausted.

“This was a vicious assault,” said Maynes, adding she doesn’t want to see the perpetrator act again.

A woman lost consciousness after she was violently sexually assaulted by a man who followed her from a bus stop in the central Spruce Avenue neighbourhood in March of 2019.

She sustained serious injuries and was found wearing only a shirt when it was -27 C.

“This survivor deserves justice,” said Maynes.

There were no witnesses, surveillance video, public tips or DNA matches in the case.

Detectives enlisted DNA technology company Parabon NanoLabs in Virginia to help in the investigation. The lab has provided DNA phenotyping to help with other files in Saskatchewan and Ontario.

Most DNA testing in Canada goes through the RCMP’s lab. Maynes said this can take a long time, as the RCMP deals with cases across the country and doesn’t have the resources or technologies that other labs do.

“We are lacking with that technology here in Canada,” said Maynes.

Paula Armentrout with Parabon said that since 2018, its labs have helped solve 230 violent crimes in North America, although not all of them used DNA phenotyping.

DNA phenotyping is not exclusive to sexual assault cases. The analysis has also been used to find possible suspects in murder cases and to identify remains.

With a computer-generated snapshot in the Edmonton sex assault case, DNA phenotyping determined the suspect to be a Black man with dark brown to black hair and dark brown eyes who stands about five-foot-four.

Armentrout said the turnaround for this type of analysis is about 45 days after receiving a DNA sample.

Police said the suspect’s description may impact a marginalized community. After consulting with community stakeholders and considering the severity of the assault and the threat to public safety, police released the details with a computer-generated image.

Any leads generated from the image will require further investigative steps, said Maynes.

“It is by no means an immediate path to accusing a suspect,” she said. “What it does is potentially give us leads in a cold case, and we can follow up with DNA testing from there.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Oct. 4, 2022.

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