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An amazing lineup of headliners awaits at this year’s CFR Cabaret!

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The Canadian Finals Rodeo returns to Red Deer October 29th, bringing together the world’s best rodeo athletes and fans from all around! Over six days, you can catch high energy performances in Bareback Riding, Bull Riding, Steer Wrestling, Ladies Barrel Racing, and more!

And the party really kicks off after dark with the CFR Cabaret! As the official post-performance party of the Canadian Finals Rodeo, the Cabaret features some of the hottest acts in country music today!

Even better, entry for the CFR46 Cabaret is free, with the exception of Saturday night’s performance featuring Corb Lund.

Just look at this entertainment lineup!

Tuesday, October 29th – Doc Walker

With over 20 Top 10 singles in total, Doc Walker is one of the most recognized Canadian country acts of the past two decades. The group has received multiple Canadian Country Music Awards, including Fans’ Choice, Group or Duo of the Year, CMT Video of the Year, Single of the Year, and Country Music Program or Special of the Year. In addition, Doc Walker has been nominated for several JUNO Awards for Country Album of the Year, including a win in 2009 for the album Beautiful Life.

 

Wednesday, October 30th – Bobby Wills

An acclaimed musician with a reputation for writing from the heart, CCMA Award winning artist Bobby Wills (MDM Recordings Inc. / Universal Music Canada) is best known for two things – his signature cowboy hat and a diverse musical personality, combining a classic country sound with a toe-tapping, dynamic twist.

 

Thursday, October 31st – George Canyon

George Canyon’s accomplishments include CCMA Awards, Juno Awards, ECMA Awards and 12 recorded albums! Canyon is a highly regarded humanitarian, strong supporter of the military, and, most important, a proud father and devoted husband. George Canyon’s latest single is titled ‘Out Of This Town’. Produced by Scott Cooke, it is now available on all streaming and purchasing platforms, and is climbing the charts at Canadian country radio. The single is the first from a forthcoming new album.

 

Friday, November 1st – The Road Hammers

The highest selling Canadian country band in history, The Road Hammers, are back with a brand-new album, The Squeeze, a compilation of tracks that epitomizes what the band has become known for – a truly synergistic blend of classic rock meets country.

 

Saturday, November 2nd – Corb Lund

“When you come from generations of ranchers and rodeo people, you can’t help but be influenced by the West,” says award-winning roots country singer Corb Lund. Lund embraces his Western heritage through his music, touching on a range of cowboy themes past and present—from rough-and-tumble tales of lawless frontier saloons, to the somber realities of running a modern family ranch.

This is the only ticketed event at the CFR Cabaret- tickets are $25 each and you can get yours HERE.

Click to find out everything there is to know about the Canadian Finals Rodeo in Red Deer, AB. 

 

 

 

Entertainment

ZZ Top: Bearded bassist Dusty Hill dies in his sleep at 72

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HOUSTON (AP) — ZZ Top bassist Dusty Hill, one of the Texas blues rock trio’s bearded figures, died at his Houston home, the band announced Wednesday. He was 72.

In their Facebook post, guitarist Billy Gibbons and drummer Frank Beard said Hill died in his sleep. They didn’t give a cause of death, but a July 21 post on the band’s website said Hill was “on a short detour back to Texas, to address a hip issue.”

At that time, the band said its longtime guitar tech, Elwood Francis, would fill in on bass, slide guitar and harmonica.

Born Joe Michael Hill in Dallas, he, Gibbons and Beard formed ZZ Top in Houston in 1969. The band released its first album, titled “ZZ Top’s First Album,” in 1970. Three years later it scored its breakthrough hit, “La Grange,” which is an ode to the Chicken Ranch, a notorious brothel outside of a Texas town by that name.

The band went on to chart the hits “Tush” in 1975, “Sharp Dressed Man,” “Legs” and “Gimme All Your Lovin’” in 1983, and “Rough Boy” and “Sleeping Bag” in 1985.

The band’s 1976 “Worldwide Texas Tour,” with its iconic Texas-shaped stage festooned with cactuses, snakes and longhorn cattle, was one of the decade’s most successful rock tours.

The band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004. Said Rolling Stones lead guitarist Keith Richards in introducing the band to the Hall: “These cats are steeped in the blues, so am I. These cats know their blues and they know how to dress it up. When I first saw them, I thought, ‘I hope these guys are not on the run, because that disguise is not going to work.’”

That look — with all three members wearing dark sunglasses and the two frontmen sporting long, wispy beards — became so iconic as to be the subject of a New Yorker cartoon and a joke on “The Simpsons.”

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This story has been corrected to reflect that ZZ Top was formed in the late 1960s, not the late 1970s.

The Associated Press


















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Jackie Mason, comic who perfected amused outrage, dies at 93

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NEW YORK (AP) — Jackie Mason, a rabbi-turned-comedian whose feisty brand of standup comedy led him to Catskills nightclubs, West Coast talk shows and Broadway stages, has died. He was 93.

Mason died Saturday at 6 p.m. ET at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Manhattan after being hospitalized for over two weeks, the celebrity lawyer Raul Felder told The Associated Press.

The irascible Mason was known for his sharp wit and piercing social commentary, often about the differences between Jews and gentiles, men and women and his own inadequacies. His typical style was amused outrage.

“Eighty percent of married men cheat in America. The rest cheat in Europe,” he once joked. Another Mason line was: “Politics doesn’t make strange bedfellows, marriage does.” About himself, he once said: “I was so self-conscious, every time football players went into a huddle; I thought they were talking about me.”

Mason was born Jacob Maza, the son of a rabbi. His three brothers became rabbis. So did Mason, who at one time had congregations in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Comedy eventually proved to be a more persistent calling than God.

“A person has to feel emotionally barren or empty or frustrated in order to become a comedian,” he told The Associated Press in 1987. “I don’t think people who feel comfortable or happy are motivated to become comedians. You’re searching for something and you’re willing to pay a high price to get that attention.”

Mason started in show business as a social director at a resort in the Catskills. He was the guy who got everybody up to play Simon Says, quiz games or shuffleboard. He told jokes, too. After one season, he was playing clubs throughout the Catskills for better money.

“Nobody else knew me, but in the mountains, I was a hit,” Mason recalled.

In 1961, the pint-sized comic got a big break, an appearance on Steve Allen’s weekly television variety show. His success brought him to “The Ed Sullivan Show” and other programs.

He was banned for two years from the “Sullivan” show when he allegedly gave the host the finger when Sullivan signaled to him to wrap up his act during an appearance on Oct. 18, 1964.

Mason’s act even carried him to Broadway, where he put on several one-man shows, including “Freshly Squeezed” in 2005, “Love Thy Neighbor” in 1996 and “The World According to Me” in 1988, for which he received a special Tony Award.

“I feel like Ronald Reagan tonight,” Mason joked on Tony night. “He was an actor all his life, knew nothing about politics and became president of the United States. I’m an ex-rabbi who knew nothing about acting and I’m getting a Tony Award.”

Mason called himself an observer who watched people and learned. From those observations he said he got his jokes and then tried them out on friends. “I’d rather make a fool of myself in front of two people for nothing than a thousand people who paid for a ticket,” he told the AP.

His humor could leap from computers and designer coffee to then-Sen. John Kerry, former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and Donald Trump. He was able to articulate the average Joe’s anger, making the indignities of life seem funny and maybe just a little bit more bearable.

“I very rarely write anything down. I just think about life a lot and try to put it into phrases that will get a joke,” he said. “I never do a joke that has a point that I don’t believe in. To me, the message and the joke is the same.”

On TV, Mason was a reliable presence, usually with a cameo on such shows as “30 Rock” or “The Simpsons” or as a reliable guest on late night chat shows. He performed in front of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II and his show “Fearless” played London’s West End in 2012.

He portrayed a Jewish ex-pajama salesman in love with an Irish-Catholic widow portrayed by Lynn Redgrave in a series called “Chicken Soup” in 1989 but it didn’t last. During the O.J. Simpson murder trial, the British Broadcasting Corp.’s Scottish service hired Mason as a weekly commentator.

Mason’s humor sometimes went too far, as when he touched off a controversy in New York while campaigning for GOP mayoral candidate Rudolph Giuliani against Democrat David Dinkins, who was Black. Mason had to apologize after saying, among other things, that Jews would vote for Dinkins out of guilt.

Felder, his longtime friend, told the AP that Mason had a Talmudic outlook on life: “That whatever you would say to him, he would start an argument with you.”

He is survived by his wife, producer Jyll Rosenfeld, and a daughter, Sheba.

Mark Kennedy, The Associated Press






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