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City of Red Deer

City Council grinding out a solution for the site of a permanent homeless shelter

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Council approves Shelter Site Evaluation Matrix

A site criteria evaluation matrix will help guide the site selection process for the future shelter in Red Deer after being approved by City Council today. During Council meetings held on June 24, 27 and July 4, Council worked through multiple exercises to determine five criteria, 22 sub-criteria and the weighting assigned to each – making up the Shelter Site Evaluation Matrix as follows:
SITE CRITERIA SUB-CRITERIA POINTS PERCENTAGES
Ability to acquire site 20
Cost 40%
Zoning 15%
Timing 40%
General 5%
Adequate size 20
Adequate land size (outside/inside) 30%
Can accommodate purpose built/dignified spaces 20%
Can accommodate on-site/integrated services 30%
Future flexible/expansion opportunity 10%
General 10%
Broad community impact 24
Operational and Budgetary Impacts 17%
Alignment with Community Vision (Strategic Plan/Downtown Vision/Vision 2040) 25%
Impact to City Reputation 13%
Economic Impact 25%
Safety Impacts 17%
General 4%
Impacts to surrounding area 26
Impacts to businesses 23%
Impacts to downtown 19%
Impacts to Parks, Trails and Greenspaces 19%
Proximity to Schools 12%
Impacts to Residential Neighbourhoods 23%
General 4%
Access to services & supports 10
Access to transit and transportation 10%
Distance/proximity to supports/services 20%
Foot Traffic Patterns 20%
Enables delivery of 24/7 integrated service 20%
Enables delivery of basic amenities/services 20%
General 10%

Council approves Shelter Site Evaluation Matrix

In the above matrix, the sub-category identified as general under each criteria represents the remaining points allocated to the overarching site criteria.

“The site criteria evaluation matrix approved today will be utilized by administration and City Council to inform decisions about the future site of an integrated shelter in Red Deer,” said Lisa Perkins, Acting City Manager. “The process of developing this matrix has been all about our commitment to consider what we heard from the public, honouring the voice of the City Council in the development of the matrix and selecting a site for the future integrated shelter.”

Along with the criteria and weighting, Council adopted a resolution outlining conditions upon which City Council developed site criteria for the Shelter Site Evaluation Matrix. Ultimately, the site criteria within the matrix are the right criteria “if” the following are true:

  1. Shelter is for those who need short stay emergency housing. There are other services/facilities along the housing spectrum.
  2. Shelter is one site.
  3. Funding may limit scope.
  4. New services have potential to change outcomes.
  5. The permanent shelter will be a housing focused delivery model [(Per Council resolution Nov – 21) – GOA confirmed Jan 22]
  6. Shelter with wrap around services may not necessarily eliminate the need for those requiring shelter to access external services, to connect with community.
  7. There are innovative alternative delivery/service and systems that need to address the diversity of clients and impact on community.
  8. The shelter will operate 24/7
  9. The shelter will be designed to provide adequate spaces for short time stays that honour the dignity of each person
  10. There is a recognition and advocacy for the ongoing housing (eg. PSH & Affordable Housing) needs.
  11. Council will continue to have discussions with the Provincial Government on future Overdose Prevention Services/Supervised Consumption Services.
  12. A good neighbour policy will be developed.
  13. Community agencies are supportive of an integrated model and willing to work collaboratively towards this.
  14. The shelter would integrate or operate as many related services on site as reasonably possible.

These statements will be utilized to inform City Council’s advocacy position around the integrated shelter going forward.

“While the decision in front of City Council in the immediate future pertains specifically to site, we also know there are many conversations to be had with the Province of Alberta about other aspects of shelter including, but not limited to, shelter design, operations and service delivery,” said Mayor Ken Johnston. “We look forward to continued collaboration with our provincial colleagues as we work in partnership to ensure a safe place for our vulnerable citizens to access required services on their journey to permanent housing, which is beneficial for the whole community.”

In addition to the resolutions about the shelter evaluation matrix criteria, City Council resolved that administration will begin preparing a list of possible sites alongside a commercial realtor with Mayor Johnston and the Deputy Mayor providing Council perspective.

Administration will come back to City Council on July 18 to share an update with City Council about the site selection process.

For more information on the shelter project process, please visit www.reddeer.ca/shelter. Citizens and community partners wanting to receive updates on the shelter project by email can subscribe here.

 

City of Red Deer

Process for choosing a permanent site for shelter in front of City Council Monday

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Potential shelter site list going to Council on Monday

Detailed information about potential sites for the future integrated shelter will be discussed by Council during a closed portion of their meeting on Monday, August 15. Thanks to the support of a commercial realtor, citizens and community partners, 96 potential sites were identified and assessed based on Council’s Site Evaluation Matrix approved on July 4. The following is a breakdown of those 96 sites:
  • 50 market sites recommended by commercial realtor
  • Five unlisted sites recommended by commercial realtor
  • 13 City or Provincially owned land
  • 22 publicly recommended sites from May to July
  • Six sites put forward during the public call for sites from July 20 to 27

From the high-level list of 96 sites identified, administration completed the initial site assessment using the tool that was shared with Council at their meeting on July 18, 2022. Sites that scored more than 70 per cent moved to the next phase of technical assessment. The 12 sites that were moved forward, were put through a more comprehensive technical review, including administrative analysis, scoring and site related details

On Monday, during a closed meeting, Council will receive detailed information about the top 12 sites, as well as the full list of 96 sites. The site locations and detailed information will not be shared publicly at this time to protect the economic interest of potential parties (including site owners) involved.  On Monday, Council will also determine their next steps in the process of selecting a site to recommend to the province, which will include their own site assessment based on their Site Evaluation Matrix.

The current target date for Council to select a site to recommend to the province is August 29, however, if additional technical information is required on the current 12 sites, or additional sites identified by Council, that target date may be pushed out by a minimum of two weeks.

For more information on the future shelter, visit www.reddeer.ca/shelter.

To view the public Council report, please visit the agenda packet page 102-111 for shelter report.

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City of Red Deer

City looking to help homeowners affected by flooding from June rains

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City Hall

City applying for disaster recovery funding to support residents affected by June rainfall

The City of Red Deer is submitting an application to the Government of Alberta’s Disaster Recovery Program (DRP) seeking financial relief for residents and property owners who experienced flooding due to excessive rainfall in June.

The DRP provides financial assistance for uninsurable loss and damage caused by emergencies and disasters. Following a disaster, affected municipalities can apply to the program and, if the municipal application is approved, affected residents can apply to the Province for financial assistance.

On Monday, The City will be submitting the first round of a DRP application seeking financial assistance for residents affected by ground flooding on or after June 23, 2022. The City is seeking to learn how many residents were affected by flooding to ensure the next phase of the application process has the most up to date information available.

Affected property owners are asked to contact the Engineering department to ensure the DRP application can be updated with more detailed information about the impacts of flooding. Owners can email [email protected] or call 403-342-8161 with the following information:

      • Name
      • Address
      • Phone number
      • Confirmation of the date flooding started on their property
      • 1-2 photos if available

If they have not already, affected residents should first contact their insurance provider to confirm which costs will be covered, as DRP funding would only apply to uninsurable losses. Residents are reminded to keep track of all receipts related to flood expenses and are forewarned that it will take time before funds may become available. Applicants to the DRP should anticipate a site visit to confirm details as part of the application process.

In June 2022, The City reported between 167 and 182 mm of rain at different locations across the city. According to Environment Canada, from 1981 to 2010, the average precipitation for the month of June at the Red Deer Regional Airport was 94 mm.

Information and updates on the application process are available on The City’s website at reddeer.ca/flood.

More information about the Alberta Government’s Disaster Recovery Program (DRP), including the types of disasters covered by the program, is available online at https://www.alberta.ca/disaster-recovery-programs.aspx. Residents affected by ground flooding are encouraged to review the ‘Homeowner and residential tenants’ fact sheet for details about qualifying for the DRP.

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