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Chief Clarence Louie and author Matt Tenney featured at Workforce Strategies Summit March 30 in Red Deer

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News Release submitted by the Central Alberta Economic Partnership (CAEP)

Prominent Speakers Keynote Workforce Strategies Summit

Two top caliber speakers will keynote the Workforce Strategies one-day summit in Red Deer March 30th.  In the morning, social entrepreneur and “Serve to be Great” and “The Mindfulness Edge” author, Matt Tenney will share his leadership development and business success strategies. Tenney is a US-based consultant and trainer with the prestigious Perth Leadership Institute. His clients include Wells Fargo, Marriott, Keller Williams, Salesforce, United Airlines, and many other companies, associations, and universities.

In the afternoon, Canadian Speakers Bureau 5-star Indigenous inclusion, First Nation leadership and economic development expert keynote speaker, Chief Clarence Louie will share his experiences, lessons learned and business-smarts approach. Chief of the Osoyoos Indian Band for over 36 years, Chief Louie is one of six First Nations leaders to emphasize economic development to improve people’s standard of living. Under his direction, the Band has become a multi-faceted corporation that owns and manages nine businesses and employs hundreds of people.

Completing the plenary sessions will be two panels of expert speakers on “Embracing the New Workforce” including topics on diversity, GenZ, and immigration, and “Automation and Technology to Fill the People Gap“.  The panelists include: Steve Miller, Implicit Career Search; Andrea Cassidy, Beyond Insurance; Nicole Arienzale, Fortis Alberta; Tonya Woolford, Xerox; Tom Muir, Poeta Digital; Jason Thompson, Warrior Supplies; and Dr. Joy Agnew, Olds College Centre for Innovation.  The panels will be moderated by  Stuart Cullum President Red Deer Polytechnic and Donna Purcell lawyer and owner of Donna Purcell QC Law.

Summit attendees can also attend private meetings with international recruitment agencies, lawyers, business consultants, and human resources professionals to discuss strategies specific to their organization’s needs.  Employers of all types including non-profit organizations and cooperatives are invited to attend to learn more about attracting and retaining staff for their specific sector needs.

Tickets are available through Eventbrite or from the CentralSummit.ca website until March 24. Lunch is included.

Workforce Strategies Summit is hosted by the Central Alberta Economic Partnership (CAEP) to help employers of all sizes gain insight and learn strategies for recruiting, hiring, and retaining employees.  It is being held March 30, 2023 at Westerner Park in Red Deer.

Recruitment and retention related businesses including such as BusinessLink, Labour Solutions Canada, BLHR Consulting, C4ner Consulting, Golden Circle Senior Resource Centre, Camrose County, EPSS, Red Deer Polytechnic, Donna Purcell Law, Immigration Care, Digitex / Xerox, CRT Legal will be available for conversations in the business-to-business B2B Lounge.

Workforce Strategies Summit is made possible through the generous sponsorship of Community Futures Central Alberta, Olds College, Red Deer Polytech, Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network, Red Deer Chamber, Burman University, Fortis Alberta, and Canadian Immigration Visa Services. Donna Purcell QC Law, Pinnacle Communications & Media inc, Waste Connections Canada, Digital.ca / Xerox and JEDI.

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Canadian Constitution Foundation in court this week intervening in “plastics ban” case

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From the Canadian Constitution Foundation

“In this case, criminal law power should not be allowed to justify the sweeping inclusion of every imaginable plastic product on the list of ‘toxic’ substances and therefore under the umbrella of federal authority,” … “The Cabinet Order plastic ban is outside the scope of the federal power.”

The Canadian Constitution Foundation (CCF) is appearing as an intervener in the legal challenge to the federal “plastics ban” being heard on June 25 and 26 at the Federal Court of Appeal. The CCF will be arguing that the federal “plastics ban” is outside the jurisdiction of Parliament’s criminal law power.

In November 2023, a Federal Court of Canada judge struck down the Trudeau government’s Cabinet Order declaring all “plastic manufactured items” as “toxic” under the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act. The Order had been challenged by a coalition of plastics companies who had argued that the Order was unreasonable and unconstitutional.

The appeal of that decision is now being heard at the Federal Court of Appeal. At issue is the scope of the federal law power. Section 91(27) of the Constitution Act grants the federal government exclusive authority to make criminal law. Previous court rulings have found and affirmed that prohibiting truly toxic substances, like lead and mercury, under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act is a legitimate expression of that power. But the criminal law power cannot be used to justify the sweeping inclusion of every imaginable plastic product onto the list of “toxic” substances and therefore under federal authority.

CCF Litigation Director, Christine Van Geyn said: “The criminal law power is not a magical incantation. Invoking the words ‘criminal law’ does not transform any issue into something Ottawa can regulate.”

“In this case, criminal law power should not be allowed to justify the sweeping inclusion of every imaginable plastic product on the list of ‘toxic’ substances and therefore under the umbrella of federal authority,” Van Geyn added “The Cabinet Order plastic ban is outside the scope of the federal power.”

The CCF is intervening in the case to argue about the scope of federal criminal law power. Criminal law powers should be applied cautiously. To claim authority to regulate something based on federal criminal law power, Parliament must clearly demonstrate the criminal aspect of the targeted activities. The federal government cannot assume control over an entire area which is not, in itself, harmful or dangerous. This is particularly important when Parliament has asserted control and jurisdiction over an amorphous subject matter prone to overlapping jurisdictions, like environmental regulation.

The Canadian Constitution Foundation is represented in its intervention by Brett Carlson and Rebecca Lang of Borden Ladner Gervais LLP.

You can read the CCF’s intervener factum here.

Christine Van Geyn
Canadian Constitution Foundation

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Automotive

US EV Industry Shifts Back Into Reality Gear

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From the Daily Caller News Foundation

By DAVID BLACKMON

 

At the start of each year, I write a piece in which I make a set of predictions about what will happen in the energy space during the coming 12 months. One prediction I made in this year’s story focused on the likelihood of a big fallout in America’s EV manufacturing industry.

Citing Fisker and Rivian as examples, I questioned whether any of the pure-play electric vehicle companies based in the United States had the ability to compete with Tesla in that market.

I took some heat from viewers that same week after I predicted on a podcast that every one of the U.S. pure-play EV makers besides Tesla would be either in bankruptcy or teetering on the brink by the end of 2024. As things are turning out, my only regret there is that I did not predict they would all be in that state by the middle of 2024 instead of the end of the year.

This week, Fisker filed for bankruptcy, becoming the latest in a series of casualties in the growing falling-out in the EV sector. As The New York Times noted in its story on the matter, Fisker was one of a number of pure-play EV makers who were able to raise billions in startup funds from investors who got caught up in the EV frenzy during 2020 and 2021.

Several of those firms, like ProterraArrival, and Lordstown Motors already preceded Fisker down the bankruptcy path. Others, like Rivian, are right on the verge of taking the same plunge.

Lucid makes just one model, a luxury sedan, and is struggling to find buyers. It boasted about setting a new delivery “record” in the first quarter of this year, but a closer search reveals that was for only 1,967 units. The carmaker followed that announcement with another in May that it would lay off 400 employees in an apparent effort to conserve cash.

Oof.

EV truck maker Nikola, meanwhile, saw its stock price hit a record low this week amid ongoing softening in the US EV market. At the close of June 20 trading, Nikola’s price had dropped to just 33 cents per share. The stock collapse comes months after the company had delivered its first hydrogen fuel cell heavy truck during Q1, but that amounted to sales of just 42 units.

These and other pure-play EV makers are not in any way serious competition for Tesla.

Note also that Tesla is having major struggles of its own as the pace of EV adoption growth slows to a snail’s pace. The company laid off 10% of its workforce in May amid the ongoing slowing of the EV market. Tesla’s rollout of its radically designed Cybertruck has been plagued by recalls, technical issues and customer complaints, and the company’s overall Q1 2024 sales numbers fell dramatically from both Q4’s numbers and year-over-year.

But its decade-long head start on the competition, vertical integration of supply chains and diversification into other ventures give Tesla advantages these other pure-play EV companies do not and cannot enjoy. It remains uniquely situated among its peer group to survive the market contraction.

Traditional automakers like Ford and GM have been able to placate investors about their stunning losses in EV ventures (Ford somehow managed to lose $132,000 per unit sold in Q1 2024) by offsetting them against major profits from their traditional gas and diesel-powered car divisions. But even those companies have invoked an array of strategic shifts over the past six months in which they have delayed or cancelled planned new investments in their EV dreams.

What we are seeing here is a rapid shifting back to reality in the US auto industry. EVs always have been, are today, and will remain a niche product that can fill specific needs for a limited segment of our population, mainly the wealthy. The reason why the traditional, gas-and-diesel-powered auto segments at companies like Ford and GM remain wildly profitable is because that is where the real auto market remains.

No amount of Soviet-style central planning, industrial policy and command-and-control edicts and regulations coming down from Washington, D.C., are going to change that reality.

David Blackmon is an energy writer and consultant based in Texas. He spent 40 years in the oil and gas business, where he specialized in public policy and communications.

The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the author and do not reflect the official position of the Daily Caller News Foundation.

Featured image screenshot: (Screen Capture/PBS NewsHour)

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