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Central Alberta

Central Albertans doing the best job per capita in the battle against COVID-19 – Updated COVID-19 stats (April 17)

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Information from covid19stats.alberta.ca

The number of COVID-19 cases in Central Alberta is up slightly to 78 after a number of days locked at 72 cases.  As you’ll see below this region is doing a good job of battling the spread of the Coronavirus.  There is a discrepancy of 1 case between the official number the province is reporting in Central Alberta, and the number of cases which are reported on the regional maps of Central Alberta.  Todayville is reporting the higher number until this is corrected on the province’s website.

Most of Central Alberta’s cases are in Red Deer and the surrounding Red Deer County.  In recent days one new case has been confirmed in Red Deer.  Of 33 total cases, just 10 are active meaning 23 people are considered recovered from their bout with COVID-19.

Across Central Alberta there are 78 cases.  The only fatality so far in Central Alberta was a woman in her 80’s from Camrose.  61 Central Albertans have recovered meaning there are just 16 active cases.  Again, 10 of those active cases are in Red Deer.  Here’s the Central Alberta breakdown.

  • Red Deer City – 33 cases – 10 Active – 23 Recovered
  • Red Deer County – 12 cases – 2 Active – 10 Recovered
  • Wetaskiwin City – 7 cases – All Recovered
  • Mountain View County – 5 cases – All Recovered
  • Lacombe County – 4 cases – All Recovered
  • Settler County – 4 cases – 3 Active – 1 Recovered
  • Lacombe City – 2 cases – 2 Recovered
  • Camrose City – 2 cases – 1 Recovered – 1 Death (Woman in her 80’s)
  • Beaver County – 2 cases – 2 Recovered
  • Camrose County – 1 case – Recovered
  • Windburn County – 1 case – Recovered
  • Vermilion River County – 1 case – Recovered
  • Ponoka County – 1 case – Recovered
  • Kneehill County – 1 case – Recovered
  • Clearwater County – 1 Case – Recovered
  • MD of Wainwright – 1 Case – Active

The province has created some graphs to help us understand which age groups have been most affected by COVID-19.  So far 40 to 49 year old Albertans have been hit the hardest with 500 cases in that age range.  The 30 to 39 year old age group is just behind with 456 cases and the 50 – 59 year old age group reports 370 cases.  Just 99 children under 10 years old have been confirmed with COVID-19.  Fatalities are hitting the older age groups the hardest.  8 people of the 119 confirmed COVID cases in their 70’s have died.  Of the 138 people in their 80’s who been confirmed with COVID-19, 33 have died.

The following graph shows only the most severe cases in the province, featuring the numbers and ages of people who’ve gone to hospital, who’ve been admitted to ICU, and those who have died.

This graph shows that Central Albertans have been the most fortunate so far.  With 77 cases, just 16 Central Albertans per 100,000 have been confirmed with COVID-19 up to April 17.  The Southern Alberta zone actually has fewer cases (68), but with fewer people, that zone reports 22 cases per 100,000 population.  Calgary is having the toughest go.  With 1673 cases reported as of April 17, the rate of cases per 100,000 people is just a hair under 100.

Here are the total numbers for the province.

Canadian artist releasing cover of Bruce Cockburn classic to launch mental health campaign April 24

 

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Central Alberta

COVID second wave completely avoiding Central Alberta

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Images from the Province of Alberta  

Despite concerns over a second wave, Covid-19 cases in Central Alberta Zone remain stubbornly low.  In the last week only 12 new cases were reported in the entire region.  That despite the fact students have been back in school for the entire month.

While the City of Calgary deals with over 500 active cases, and Edmonton battles over 700 active cases, Central region is bucking the trend.  As of September 29, the entire region has a total of 21 active cases!

 

 

Currently the municipality with most cases in the Central region is Mountain View County where there are 8 active cases.  That does not include the Town of Olds which has one case.

 

The following information is the latest from the province regarding specific municipalities in Central Alberta.  These numbers aren’t updated as quickly as the total numbers so there are still a few cases here which are actually now recovered.  This list shows 9 cases which are now recovered.

Central Alberta Communities – Active Cases
  1. 8 – Mountain View County
  2. 7 – Red Deer (0 cases in North Red Deer)
  3. 5 – Ponoka County
  4. 3 – Red Deer County
  5. 1 – Lacombe
  6. 1 – Sylvan Lake
  7. 1 – County of Lacombe
  8. 1 – Olds
  9. 1 – Drumheller
  10. 1 – Wetaskiwin
  11. 1 – Paintearth County
  12. 0 – Beaver County
  13. 0 – Camrose
  14. 0 – Camrose County
  15. 0 – Clearwater County
  16. 0 – Flagstaff County
  17. 0 – Kneehill County
  18. 0 – Minburn County
  19. 0 – Provost County
  20. 0 – Settler County
  21. 0 – Starland County
  22. 0 – Special Areas 2
  23. 0 – Special Areas 4
  24. 0 – Two Hills County
  25. 0 – Vermillion River County
  26. 0 – MD of Wainwright
  27. 0 – Wetaskiwin County

Here are the total number of cases for the entire province including all the recoveries.

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#RedDeerStrong

COVID can’t stop CAFF

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Central Alberta Film Festival to proceed in Red Deer in partnership with CMHA

Screenings and Awards Show to take place in-person at Festival Hall in Red Deer with help from Canadian Mental Health Association

The 2020 Central Alberta Film Festival (CAFF) will take place onsite at Festival Hall in Red Deer October 14, 15, 16, and 17. Canadian Mental Health Association will run the box office and earn a portion of the ticket sales.

“The partnership between CMHA and CAFF is a perfect fit,” says Ranjit Mullakady, President of CAFF. “CMHA has volunteers in place, and CAFF has a way to contribute to CMHA fundraising.”

Organizers are preparing to offer an in-person festival experience in a safe environment, allowing for social distancing.

Tickets will be sold for blocks of time instead of individual films. Screenings will run 6:00-9:00 p.m. on October 14 15, and 16. Screenings will run 12:00-2:00 and 3:00-5:00 p.m. on October 17, followed by an awards show at 6:30-9:00 p.m.

A variety of short and full-length films will be shown during the blocks without intermission.

“People can take breaks throughout the screenings if they need to, with social distancing protocols in mind,” says Mullakady.

Seating will be at tables this year, so groups of attendees will remain socially distant from other groups.

“We’ve always known the Festival would go on, even with worries about COVID-19,” says Mullakady. “We have a backup plan if things change. The festival will go on.”

CAFF is prepared to go forward as a drive-in event if government regulations about indoor gatherings change.

About Central Alberta Film Festival (CAFF)

Central Alberta Film Festival is a not-for-profit cultural organization with a mission to educate, support and promote cinematography and film making in Alberta and Canada. CAFF is a bridge between the audience, critics and the contemporary filmmakers who want to showcase and discuss their work. This festival is a platform to incubate Albertan, Canadian, and international talent. The fourth annual Central Alberta Film Festival will take place October 14-17, 2020.

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september, 2020

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