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Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre thrilled with Provincial Funding announcement

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Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre

Mark Jones of the Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre comments on the Province’s financial commitment to children

From the Province of Alberta 

New funding model for child advocacy centres

The Government of Alberta is introducing a consistent and equitable funding model to help vulnerable children across the province get the help they need.

Child advocacy centres provide a safe place for children and youth who have experienced abuse. The centres allow clients to tell their stories and access support throughout the entire process of disclosure, investigation, the judicial phase and healing journey.

The centres bring together multi-disciplinary teams to provide a coordinated and child-friendly approach that minimizes trauma, supports healing, and increases the likelihood of offender conviction.

A new funding allocation model will replace the previous system of annual grants, which created uncertainty and inconsistency between centres. A three-year funding cycle will ensure an equitable and sustainable approach, emphasizing government’s continued commitment to supporting the most vulnerable Albertans.

“Child Advocacy Centres show the power of public, private and not-for profit organizations working with caring citizens to support children and families affected by abuse. This new funding model will ensure fairness across the province and give families certainty in accessing the supports they need.”

Rebecca Schulz, Minister of Children’s Services

“We are grateful for the support of the Government of Alberta. Child Advocacy Centres are the result of a strong community response working to end child abuse through collaboration of services and resources. This funding allows us to continue to help children and youth who have experienced abuse efficiently access the services and supports they need, under one roof.”

Allison McCollum, chair, Zebra Child Protection Centre

“This long-term funding model allows us to plan for the future of our centre in a thoughtful way. While we are disappointed to receive less funding than before, we understand the need to ensure equity across the province and we will look to take a leadership role in collecting data and information to inform government decision-making over the next few years.”

Karen Orser, CEO, Calgary Child Advocacy Centre

Government will provide $3.4 million per year for 2020-23 to support child advocacy centres in Edmonton, Calgary, Grande Prairie, Red Deer, Lloydminster and Fort McMurray. Funding has been set aside for centres in Medicine Hat and Lethbridge, should they become operational.

2019 2022-23
Zebra Child Protection Centre (Edmonton) $712,000 $1,037,050
Calgary and Area Child Advocacy Centre $1,979,000 $1,306,850
Caribou Centre Child Advocacy Centre (Grande Prairie) $150,000 $202,350
Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre (Red Deer) $150,000 $303,530
The Little Bear Child and Youth Advocacy Centre (Lloydminster) $115,530 $126,470
Care Centre for Children and Youth (Fort McMurray) $133,000 $160,200

Total funding amounts will not change, but will be distributed based on the new model, which takes into account previous base funding, the volume of clients served, and the intensity of need based on a community’s child intervention caseload. The three-year grants will also include data collection obligations, allowing for funding based on consistent metrics across the province. The funding allocation model does not affect co-located government staff from Children’s Services and Alberta Health Services.

New funding model reduces red tape

Because grants will no longer have to be renewed each year, the new funding model will reduce the administrative burden on centres and government staff. This is part of government’s ongoing commitment to reducing red tape and making processes more efficient.

Quick facts

  • In 2008, there were 14,403 substantiated cases of child abuse in Alberta.
  • 36 per cent of adults in Alberta have experienced some form of abuse in their youth.
  • Alberta’s Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act requires anyone who believes a child is at risk to report their concern.
  • Albertans should know the signs of abuse and neglect, and report any concerns to the Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-387-KIDS (available in multiple languages, 24 hours a day), or contact a local Children’s Services office, Delegated First Nations Agency, or law enforcement.
  • The funding in each centre will be directed towards multidisciplinary triage, forensic interviews, victim advocacy, court preparation, and service coordination (medical and mental health referrals).

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Alberta

Province loosens rules for participants and team volunteers in Rinks and Rec Centres

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Further clarity for youth participants in the Provincial Restrictions Exemption Program

As of Monday, September 20, 2021, The City of Red Deer has adopted the Provincial Restrictions Exemption Program. The program applies at all City owned and operated recreation and culture facilities.As a part of the Restrictions Exemption Program, The City had previously announced that all vaccine-eligible visitors 12 years and older to City facilities would need to show proof of vaccination, a valid medical exemption, or a negative rapid COVID-19 test within 72 hours of entry. Over the weekend, the Government of Alberta released further details about the Restrictions Exemption Program which clarify the requirements for youth sport, fitness and performance activities.

As a result of continued consultation with provincial government representatives, the following updates have been applied for all City of Red Deer recreation and culture facilities, effective September 21, 2021:

  • Volunteers for organized sport groups can enter to perform their activity-related responsibilities without proof of vaccination, exemption, or negative COVID-19 test

  • Youth sport, fitness and performance participants can take part in their activities without proof of vaccination, exemption or negative COVID-19 test

  • Youth aged 12-17 must show proof of vaccination, medical exemption or a negative test result to enter any facility while not participating in activity. This includes spectators, or using the concourse and common areas.

  • Anyone ages 18 or older will be required to show proof of vaccination, medical exemption or a negative rapid test result within 72 hours of a visit to facilities.

    • From September 20 to October 25, proof of a single dose is considered acceptable as long as the dose was given more than two weeks before visiting a facility. After October 25, proof of double vaccination is required.

All other vaccine-eligible visitors will be required to follow the guidelines set out for the Provincial Restrictions Exemption Program which can be seen here: https://www.alberta.ca/covid-19-public-health-actions.aspx.

Effective September 20, anyone unable to wear a mask will be required to provide a medical exemption letter from an authorized health professional. More information about mask exemptions is available at alberta.ca/masks

Please visit www.reddeer.ca/RecUpdate for more information about the Restrictions Exemption Program at our facilities.

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Alberta

Canadian women's hockey team to play B.C. Junior A men as part of Olympic prep

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CALGARY — Canada’s women’s hockey team will play a pair of games against male Junior A teams in B.C. next month.

The national women’s team, currently centralized in Calgary to prepare for the 2022 Winter Olympics, will travel to face the Trail Smoke Eaters on Oct. 4 and the Cranbrook Bucks on Oct. 5.

Canada is coming off winning a women’s world championship Aug. 31 in Calgary, where the host country edged the United States in overtime for gold.

Twenty-six skaters are trying out for 20 spots on the Olympic roster.

Three goaltenders have already been named to the Beijing-bound side: Ann-Renée Desbiens, Emerance Maschmeyer and Kristen Campbell.

The women are accustomed to a regular slate of games against male midget triple-A clubs as part of their Olympic prep, but games against Junior A teams are more rare.

Goaltender Shannon Szabados made 52 saves in Canada’s 3-2 win over the AJHL’s Calgary Canucks on Dec. 5, 2009.

Canada split a pair of Maritime Junior Hockey League games in September of 2019, when the women lost 4-2 to the Valley Wildcats and downed the Pictou County Crushers 4-1.

“We are grateful to both Trail and Cranbrook for their willingness to be part of our training as we start our season,” said Gina Kingsbury, Hockey Canada director of operations for the national women’s teams, in a statement Monday.

“The level of competition we expect to face is crucial in our journey and we look forward to showcasing our athletes to hockey fans in both communities.”

Fans can buy tickets and attend both games subject to meeting B.C.’s COVID-19 requirements.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 20, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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