Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Alberta

Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre thrilled with Provincial Funding announcement

Published

Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre

Mark Jones of the Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre comments on the Province’s financial commitment to children

From the Province of Alberta 

New funding model for child advocacy centres

The Government of Alberta is introducing a consistent and equitable funding model to help vulnerable children across the province get the help they need.

Child advocacy centres provide a safe place for children and youth who have experienced abuse. The centres allow clients to tell their stories and access support throughout the entire process of disclosure, investigation, the judicial phase and healing journey.

The centres bring together multi-disciplinary teams to provide a coordinated and child-friendly approach that minimizes trauma, supports healing, and increases the likelihood of offender conviction.

A new funding allocation model will replace the previous system of annual grants, which created uncertainty and inconsistency between centres. A three-year funding cycle will ensure an equitable and sustainable approach, emphasizing government’s continued commitment to supporting the most vulnerable Albertans.

“Child Advocacy Centres show the power of public, private and not-for profit organizations working with caring citizens to support children and families affected by abuse. This new funding model will ensure fairness across the province and give families certainty in accessing the supports they need.”

Rebecca Schulz, Minister of Children’s Services

“We are grateful for the support of the Government of Alberta. Child Advocacy Centres are the result of a strong community response working to end child abuse through collaboration of services and resources. This funding allows us to continue to help children and youth who have experienced abuse efficiently access the services and supports they need, under one roof.”

Allison McCollum, chair, Zebra Child Protection Centre

“This long-term funding model allows us to plan for the future of our centre in a thoughtful way. While we are disappointed to receive less funding than before, we understand the need to ensure equity across the province and we will look to take a leadership role in collecting data and information to inform government decision-making over the next few years.”

Karen Orser, CEO, Calgary Child Advocacy Centre

Government will provide $3.4 million per year for 2020-23 to support child advocacy centres in Edmonton, Calgary, Grande Prairie, Red Deer, Lloydminster and Fort McMurray. Funding has been set aside for centres in Medicine Hat and Lethbridge, should they become operational.

2019 2022-23
Zebra Child Protection Centre (Edmonton) $712,000 $1,037,050
Calgary and Area Child Advocacy Centre $1,979,000 $1,306,850
Caribou Centre Child Advocacy Centre (Grande Prairie) $150,000 $202,350
Central Alberta Child Advocacy Centre (Red Deer) $150,000 $303,530
The Little Bear Child and Youth Advocacy Centre (Lloydminster) $115,530 $126,470
Care Centre for Children and Youth (Fort McMurray) $133,000 $160,200

Total funding amounts will not change, but will be distributed based on the new model, which takes into account previous base funding, the volume of clients served, and the intensity of need based on a community’s child intervention caseload. The three-year grants will also include data collection obligations, allowing for funding based on consistent metrics across the province. The funding allocation model does not affect co-located government staff from Children’s Services and Alberta Health Services.

New funding model reduces red tape

Because grants will no longer have to be renewed each year, the new funding model will reduce the administrative burden on centres and government staff. This is part of government’s ongoing commitment to reducing red tape and making processes more efficient.

Quick facts

  • In 2008, there were 14,403 substantiated cases of child abuse in Alberta.
  • 36 per cent of adults in Alberta have experienced some form of abuse in their youth.
  • Alberta’s Child, Youth and Family Enhancement Act requires anyone who believes a child is at risk to report their concern.
  • Albertans should know the signs of abuse and neglect, and report any concerns to the Child Abuse Hotline at 1-800-387-KIDS (available in multiple languages, 24 hours a day), or contact a local Children’s Services office, Delegated First Nations Agency, or law enforcement.
  • The funding in each centre will be directed towards multidisciplinary triage, forensic interviews, victim advocacy, court preparation, and service coordination (medical and mental health referrals).

Alberta

Albertans encouraged to wear cloth masks in public: easy tips and links on “How To” make your own

Published

on

It is not the law, but Canada and Alberta have agreed with the idea that wearing a homemade cloth mask might help in the spreading the coronavirus, especially when it is hard to maintain the 2-metre physical distancing when in public.

Remember that the medical grade masks are for front-line care workers, medical staff and first responders. Photo/CANADIAN PRESS

Unlike many Asian countries where a lot of the population regularly wear masks in public, in Western counties wearing a mask in public is not as easily accepted by the majority of the population. One unproven theory is that images of the face masks, conjure up ideas of the bad guys, bank robbers, the wild west’s banditos all wear cloth face covers.

Not pulling any punches, virologist and immunologist, George Gao told ScienceMagazine.org, “The big mistake in the U.S. and Europe – is that people aren’t wearing masks.”

George Gao

Gao is the director-general of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, “This virus is transmitted by droplets and close contact. You’ve got to wear a mask, because when you speak, there are always droplets coming out of your mouth – masks, can prevent droplets that carry the virus from escaping and infecting others.” Across Asian countries the populations are onboard that, “there are an unknown number of people that are asystematic, carrying the coronavirus and they do not even know it.” So, in the spirit of a country’s solidarity, “there is a need to protect others from yourself.”

In recent weeks countries have seen the stats and cannot ignore the lower numbers of infected in mask wearing countries like, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Singapore, the region of Hong Kong and China has also now flatted the curve and have loosed up on the city military lockdowns.

Recently passing laws that make it mandatory to wear a face mask in public are the Czech, Slovakia, Indonesia and the Philippines. On April 3rd, US President Donald Trump, announced that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending, on a voluntary basis, that Americans wear “non-medical cloth” face coverings.

In Canada Chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam has changed her view and is now saying, “Wearing a non-medical mask, even if you have no symptoms, is an additional measure that you can take to protect others around you in situations where physical distancing is difficult to maintain, such as in public transit or maybe in the grocery store.”

In Alberta, the view has also changed on the general public wearing mask in public. Leading off with the premier Kenney, who has seen countries that have been successful in keeping the transmission of COVID-19 down, have all had widespread use of facemasks. Alberta’s Chief Medical Officer of Health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw said at a press conference, “What we know is that people who are sick spread illness – wearing a non-medical mask, such as a homemade cloth mask, has not been proven to protect the person who is wearing it,” but added, “However, it may be helpful in protecting others around you.”

The Alberta government wants people to follow these rules, even when wearing face coverings in public.

  • Continue to follow all other public health guidance (staying two metres away from others, wash hands regularly, stay home when sick).
  • Avoid touching your face and mask while using it.
  • Wash hands before putting on a mask, then before and after removing it.
  • Clean a cloth mask as soon as it gets damp or soiled.
  • Put it directly in the washing machine or a sealed bag that can be emptied into the washing machine and then be disposed of.
  • Cloth masks can be laundered with other items using a hot cycle, then dried in the dryer at the highest temperature setting.
  • Medical masks can’t be washed and should be discarded and replaced as soon as they get damp, soiled or crumpled.
  • Dispose of these masks in a lined garbage bin.
  • Do not share masks with others.

There are many online resources where you can easily make a cloth mask with or without a sewing machine.

  1. CDC has a page with easy instructions; https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html
  2. Japanese Creations on YouTube has two great “How To” videos. One has 1.5+ million views already. The second one has good tips to help glasses from fogging up, using some tin foil and a piece of tissue. Both without the need for a sewing machine. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyxl_I7lKw-bjUz3ECa_jwg
  3. Youtuber Danysska from the Czech republic has a very easy how to do instructions on how to make a cloth mask with no sewing; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMwkTLGONOg
  4. The Surgeon General for the US, Dr. Jerome Adam has an easy to follow “how-to” video on how to make a face mask, with-out a sewing machine.
  5. With over 1.7+ million views, HomeMadeOnOurHomestead, has a good how to sew a reusable face mask with a filter pocket; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zm_NmpdgWWA
  6. Thoughtful Creativity 1.5+ million views on her tutorial on how to make cloth face masks in a batches using a sewing machine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FW1TCQDN4do
  7. Kim’s Kitchen Affair has over 1.4+ million views on her DIY on how to sew a reusable pleated face mask with nose bridge and Filter Pockets in just 5 Minutes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K4dH3-LHLQ
  8. From prixprix on com by step with photo instructions on a, No-Sew T-shirt Face Mask www.instructables.com/id/No-Sew-T-shirt-Face-Mask/

Click here to read more on Todayville Edmonton.

Controls can keep Canadian COVID-19 deaths under 22,000, health agency says

Continue Reading

Alberta

Just 28 new COVID cases reported in Alberta, but 3 more deaths for a total of 32

Published

on

From the Province of Alberta

Update 27: COVID-19 pandemic in Alberta (April 9)

There are now 592 confirmed recovered cases of COVID-19 in the province.

With 28 new cases reported, the total number of cases in Alberta is 1,451.

Another three Albertans have died since the last report, bringing the total deaths in the province to 32.

Latest updates

  • Expanded access to testing has begun to better trace the spread of COVID-19 in hard-hit areas and in vulnerable residents.
  • Albertans are strongly encouraged to stay home and in the province this long weekend.
  • Cases have been identified in all zones across the province:
    • 878 cases in the Calgary zone
    • 376 cases in the Edmonton zone
    • 97 cases in the North zone
    • 72 cases in the Central zone
    • 26 cases in the South zone
    • Two cases in zones yet to be confirmed
  • Of these cases, there are currently 47 people in hospital, 14 of whom have been admitted to intensive care units (ICU).
  • 192 cases are suspected of being community acquired.
  • There are now a total of 592 confirmed recovered cases.
  • Two new deaths are from the Calgary zone, bringing the total in this zone to 22. One additional person has died in the Edmonton zone, bringing the number of deaths to five in this zone. Four people have died in the North zone, and one person has died in the Central zone.
  • Stronger outbreak measures have been put in place at continuing care facilities. To date, 151 cases have been confirmed at these facilities.
  • There have been 68,116 people tested for COVID-19 and a total of 70,247 tests performed by the lab. There were 1,333 people tested in the last 24 hours.
  • Aggregate data, showing cases by age range and zone, as well as by local geographic areas, is available online at alberta.ca/covid19statistics.
  • All Albertans need to work together to help prevent the spread and overcome COVID-19.
  • Restrictions remain in place for all gatherings and close-contact businesses, dine-in restaurants and non-essential retail services. A full list of restrictions is available online.
  • Tighter restrictions have been placed on visitors to continuing care centres, group homes and other facilities. No visitors will be allowed unless a resident is dying or the visitor is essential for delivering care that cannot be delivered by staff.
  • As Albertans look forward to the holiday weekend, they are being reminded to:
    • avoid gatherings outside of their immediate household
    • visit over coffee remotely and virtually
    • try to shop for groceries outside of peak hours
    • limit Easter egg hunts to inside or on their property
    • find ways to connect while being physically separated
    • worship in a way that does not put people at risk, including participating in virtual or live-streamed religious celebrations

More guidelines for faith-based organizations can be found online.

Expanding testing to meet needs of Albertans

Alberta is expanding access to COVID-19 laboratory tests to better trace the spread of the novel coronavirus in hard-hit areas and in vulnerable residents. Testing is now being offered to three additional groups of individuals exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 including cough, fever, runny nose, sore throat or shortness of breath:

  • symptomatic people living in the Calgary Zone
  • symptomatic people who live with someone aged 65 years or older
  • essential workers whose workplaces remain accessible to the public

Read the full list of people eligible for testing here. People can access tests by completing the COVID-19 self-assessment online.

The chief medical officer of health will examine and adjust testing protocols and access to COVID-19 tests based on the changing situation in Alberta.

Stay home and in Alberta this long weekend

Albertans are being strongly encouraged to stay home, in their communities, in the province and off the highways this long weekend to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Alberta and British Columbia have released a joint statement asking families and friends to stay in their home provinces and celebrate the holidays virtually. This will reduce the risk of highway crashes – tying up emergency and medical responders who are busy with pandemic planning and care – and help slow the spread of the novel coronavirus between families and provinces.

COVID-19 health care for out-of-country visitors

To limit the potential spread of the novel coronavirus, individuals visiting Alberta from another country will receive physician and hospital services for the treatment of COVID-19 – even if they do not have health coverage or the ability to pay. This temporary measure will protect Albertans and encourage visitors to obtain treatment for COVID-19. Physicians may submit claims for this service using the new COVID-19 billing process. More information about the billing process will be provided to physicians.

Alberta Connects Contact Centre

The Alberta Connects Contact Centre continues to operate over the long weekend, and will be available to Albertans from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., April 10-13. Direct lines to specific services (such as MyAlberta Digital Identity) will be closed. Albertans should call 310-4455 for assistance.

Access to justice

The Alberta Court of Appeal has provided an update regarding electronic hearings. More information: https://albertacourts.ca/ca/publications/announcements

Mental health supports

Confidential supports are available to help with mental health concerns. The Mental Health Help Line 1-877-303-2642 and the Addiction Help Line at 1-866-332-2322 are available between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., seven days a week. Online resources provide advice on handling stressful situations or ways to talk with children.

Family violence prevention

A 24-hour Family Violence Information Line is available at 310-1818 to get anonymous help.

Alberta’s One Line for Sexual Violence is available at 1-866-402-8000 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in more than 170 languages.

Information sheets and other resources on family violence prevention are available at alberta.ca/COVID19.

Quick facts

  • The most important measures that Albertans can take to prevent respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19, is to practise good hygiene.
    • This includes cleaning your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds, avoiding touching your face, coughing or sneezing into your elbow or sleeve, disposing of tissues appropriately.
  • Anyone who has health concerns or is experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 should complete an online COVID-19 self-assessment.
  • For recommendations on protecting yourself and your community, visit alberta.ca/COVID19.
Continue Reading

april, 2020

fri17apr10:00 am9:00 pmFeaturedOur Best to You Spring Handmade Market10:00 am - 9:00 pm Westerner Park, Parkland & Prairie Pavilions, 4847A-19 Street Event Organized By: Signatures Shows Ltd

Trending

X