Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Education

Celebrating BMO’s community investment in RDC

Published

5 minute read

From Red Deer College

BMO Financial Group’s support honoured at unveiling event

Red Deer, January 21, 2019 – At an event in the Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre/Centre des Jeux du Canada Gary W. Harris this morning, Red Deer College proudly unveiled the BMO Financial Group Wellness Studio.

In recognition of their $300,000 contribution toward RDC’s Shaping Our Future campaign, the loft-like space above the south end of Builders’ Hall in RDC’s newest facility has been named for the next five years.

This stunning space is a vital component of the Collicutt Performance Fitness Zone, and is used for fitness classes, yoga and meditation. The BMO Financial Group Wellness Studio’s floor-to-ceiling windows look out over the NOVA Chemicals Waskasoo Creek Nature Walk on the south end, and Builders’ Hall to the north. This bright, quiet space contributes to the building’s holistic approach toward wellness by providing an indoor fitness space that connects users to the natural landscape beyond its walls, supporting an individual’s spiritual, environmental and physical wellness.

BMO Financial Group is a committed community partner, and has supported RDC as a proud donor and sponsor in the past and with other initiatives. Their most recent contribution to Red Deer College and the Shaping Our Future campaign is an investment in the health and wellness of RDC students as well as the community members who use the College’s newest facility.

For Red Deer College, this community investment reinforces the support of industry and local businesses for the role that RDC plays in the region.

“We’re grateful, and proud to acknowledge, the strong support that BMO Financial Group has provided to Red Deer College, to support our students and community today and in the future,” says Joel Ward, RDC President & CEO. “We have a shared vision for our region, as community leaders who recognize that we have the power to shape the future of our region, our province and our communities by investing in the total wellness of our citizens.”

The Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre, which is perhaps the most recognizable result of the Shaping Our Future campaign, is only one component of the work RDC has been able to accomplish with the support of community partners like BMO Financial Group.

The College has increased its footprint by nearly a third, with new infrastructure projects including an Alternative Energy Lab and New Residence. RDC has also developed new programs and enhanced existing programs that prepare graduates for success within new and emerging careers that support central Alberta businesses in a diverse and changing economy. All of this will ensure RDC can best continue to serve our learners and communities as we become a comprehensive regional teaching university.

About RDC: For 55 years, RDC has been proudly serving its learners and communities. The College continues to grow programs, facilities and opportunities as it transitions to become a comprehensive regional teaching university during the next three to five years. This year, RDC will add seven new programs to more than 100 established programs (including full degrees, certificates, diplomas and skilled trades programs). RDC educates 7,500 full-and part-time credit students and more than 38,000 youth and adult learners in the School of Continuing Education each year. The College is expanding its teaching, learning, athletic and living spaces with the additions of the state-of-the-art Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre/Centre des Jeux du Canada Gary W. Harris, Alternative Energy Lab and construction of a new Residence which all enhance RDC’s Alternative Energy Initiative. Main campus is strategically situated on 290 acres of Alberta’s natural landscape along Queen Elizabeth II Highway. RDC is also proud to serve its Donald School of Business students housed at a downtown campus, located in the Millennium Centre, in addition to housing teaching and learning space at the Welikoklad Event Centre.

President Todayville Inc., Honorary Lieutenant Colonel 41 Signal Regiment, Board Member Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Award Foundation, Board Member Canadian Forces Liaison Council (Alberta) Musician, Photographer, Former VP/GM CTV Edmonton.

Follow Author

Central Alberta

Jo(e) Youth Creative. First-of-its-kind social media learning space for kids AND adults.

Published on

Written by Joe Whitbread

Despite a pandemic & economic uncertainty, (and even health issues) Jo Phillips and I are pretty proud to have successfully opened a whole new business, alongside what we’ve already accomplished at Joe Social Media Inc. and even created Summer jobs while we’re at it.
  
Have you heard of Jo(e) Youth Creative yet? You will.
Every adult knows or has some amazing, creative kids, that love to perform, create, draw, dance, produce, direct or play. These kids are using their devices, cameras and social channels to share cool content, to watch creators around the world, to learn and to communicate positively with their friends.
Kids are generating remarkable online channels and content but most adults keep them at arms length, based on fear or lack of knowledge. This is leaving good kids, who see obvious digital opportunities and fun, right in front of them, without permission to explore or achieve. These misconceived notions from parents, of what kids are actually doing online, is creating untrust and misunderstandings, because the internet and almost all media you see, tells us kids are doing terrible things online.
Joe Youth Creative is a first-of-its-kind, safe mentorship and learning space for kids! But it’s also for you!
Adults, seniors and kids have got to get on the same page when it comes to digital learning.
We’re running Summer camps and clubs in TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and many other unique social media opportunities for kids. (Space is very limited, due to Covid restrictions & we practice ALL health and safety guidelines).
We also have social media training and learning for adults and seniors.
Jo(e) isn’t about adding more screen time for your family, it’s about mentoring safe use, developing confident kids, fostering creativity, empowering youngsters to openly talk about the digital things they love at home, and even creating entrepreneurship opportunities, on amazing platforms, that have never been exposed or explored before, due to the negativity that surrounds every breath about social media in our world.
Jo and I have done our research, by touring in schools and speaking with 10’s of thousands of kids, parents, teachers, educators and experts.
We’re trusted, across the province, in our field.
We know there are plenty of good kids, doing great things online and we are desperately trying to support them, in what they’re doing, instead of banning and forbidding them from places adults admittedly know little about.
Please like our pages and check out our clubs, camps and courses. I’m wide open to any and all of your questions.
JoeYouthCreative.com (FB, IG, TikTok, YouTube)
JoeSocialMedia.com (FB, IG, Twitter, LinkedIn, TikTok)
WhitbreadPhillips.com (Public speaking & social media presentation bookings)
Continue Reading

Edmonton

Hockey, basketball and volleyball gone from the U of A’s fall and winter to-do lists

Published on

At almost any time in memory, Wednesday’s decision to remove hockey, basketball and volleyball from the University of Alberta’s fall and winter to-do lists would be considered a major surprise.

This year, I suspect fans and athletes should have been at least partially prepared for it. Blame the pandemic. That’s easy.

Explain that sponsorship money has dried up and every available penny must be saved to keep professors employed and students involved. That’s easy, too. Some are sure to suggest that there are deep political motives in this move to move beyond the Bears and Pandas for one year. Maybe. Maybe not. Rightly or wrongly, political movements are seen in every action these days.

If additional explanations are required, Alberta’s UCP government is sure to be singled out as cause number three; they inherited an entity in severe financial difficulty, ensuring that some budget cuts would be made as soon as possible after the NDP lost political control of the province.

This, of course, occurred well before the coronavirus crisis created overwhelming proof that sport, certainly in Canada, is something of an after-thought at all levels of society. As this is written, every professional sport is being exposed on a daily basis as a means for millionaires and billionaires to fatten their bankrolls. If timely political statements are necessary, fine; they’ll be made, but no rational soul would dare to suggest that sport has actual relevance in this time of incoherent arguments and twisted responses.

In one old scribbler’s opinion, good news ultimately will develop, almost as a result of the disappearance of the Bears and Pandas for at least one season. A move so dramatic at a level so vital is sure to create deep thought.

Which is where university sport fits in the puzzle. These organizations are the home of undoubted brilliance. In many ways, they create the model for all amateurs and low-profile professionals to follow. One day, perhaps soon, this world-wide rash of social, physical and emotional misery will be behind us. Then, cohorts of tough and committed leaders across the entire spectrum of athletics will have to step up. They will be obligated to contribute time and effort in a search for the best possible ways to ensure excellence in scholastics, citizenship and competition.

Now, looking back for even a few years, it’s essential to remember that amateur sports were being painfully slammed by financial necessities before COVID-19’s destructive arrival.

Athletic directors at U of A and MacEwan University have spoken of rising costs in tones that sometimes sounded almost desperate. I’m sure the same applies to the University of Calgary.

Similar words have been heard commonly in discussion with coaches and athletic directors at Alberta colleges. NAIT and Concordia leaders know the topic extremely well. So do alumni members working to keep hockey alive in the storied atmosphere of Camrose’s Augustana campus of the U of A.

In a lifetime of hearing old adages, one has stuck out since childhood:

“It’s Always Darkest Before the Dawn.”

This corner hopes the dawn comes quickly.

All is Well in Soccer – So Far

Continue Reading

july, 2020

No Events

Trending

X