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Alberta

A regional comparison of ALERT crime stats for 2019 – Arrests, Charges, Guns, Drugs off the streets

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ALERT 2019 Red Deer

From the Alberta Law Enforcement Response Team

Transition, Triumph for ALERT in 2019

While changes were afoot, including a new CEO, Alberta Law Enforcement Response Teams still managed to achieve one of its most successful years ever in 2019.

Over the calendar year, ALERT teams across the province laid 1,402 criminal charges against 241 suspects; took 92 firearms out of the hands of gang members and drug dealers; seized more than $4 million in proceeds of crime; and removed nearly $13 million worth of cocaine, fentanyl and methamphetamine from the streets of Alberta communities.

“Since being appointed chief executive officer in August 2019, I’ve been very impressed with ALERT’s operations and the results the organization is able to achieve,” said ALERT CEO Supt. Dwayne Lakusta. “It’s a fast-paced, ever-changing landscape, but our front-line investigators and support staff behind the scenes do exceptional work to keep up and deliver the results Albertans expect.”

ALERT is mandated to address organized and serious crime across Alberta, with regional offices located in Calgary, Edmonton, Fort McMurray, Grande Prairie, Lethbridge, Medicine Hat, and Red Deer. A breakdown of statistics by region for the 2019 calendar year is available on ALERT’s website and YouTube channel.

The biggest highlight of the year for ALERT was Project Coyote, a joint investigation with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration that resulted in record amounts of cocaine and fentanyl pills seized. All told, over the course of two years, Project Coyote resulted in the seizure of $15 million worth of drugs, including 81.5 kilograms of cocaine in Houston, Texas, and 250,000 fentanyl pills in a Calgary apartment.

“Project Coyote was a lengthy, complex investigation, and I applaud our team in Calgary for their ongoing commitment to the investigation,” Lakusta said. “It’s a significant bust, and a great example of the efforts taken by our teams to fight organized crime.”

Some of ALERT’s other successes in 2019 include: outlaw bikers arrested for drug trafficking in Red Deer; a firearms straw purchaser foiled in Grande Prairie; a B.C.-Edmonton drug pipeline cut off; a record meth seizure in Medicine Hat; an arrest made in Lethbridge in a series of vehicle thefts; and two children being rescued as result of a child exploitation investigation.

A compilation of highlights from 2019 is available on ALERT’s website.

With new funding foreshadowed in the recent provincial budget and ALERT’s successes from 2019 to build upon, Lakusta is looking forward to expanding on the organization’s important work in 2020.

“We are excited to enhance opportunities to make communities across Alberta safer,” Lakusta said. “By working closely with other law enforcement agencies and community partners, we will continue to work toward our goals of disrupting and dismantling organized crime.”

Members of the public who suspect drug or gang activity in their community can call local police, or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). Crime Stoppers is always anonymous.

ALERT was established and is funded by the Alberta Government and is a compilation of the province’s most sophisticated law enforcement resources committed to tackling serious and organized crime.

Alberta

Province defends post-secondary funding changes. Says United Kingdom, Denmark, Finland, Hong Kong using performance-based funding

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Minister Nicolaides meets with student leaders prior to announcing a new post-secondary funding announcement.

From The Province of Alberta

Transforming post-secondary funding

A new outcomes-based post-secondary funding approach will increase transparency and accountability and help build a modern and diverse workforce for the future.

Under the new funding model, a portion of government funding to colleges, universities and polytechnics will be based on achieving key performance measures. Performance measures will encourage institutions to improve services, increase efficiencies and create opportunities for Albertans through strong labour market outcomes and innovative programs and research.

“This is a new and completely transformative funding model for our universities, colleges and polytechnics. Our new approach will help ensure students are set up for success by encouraging institutions to produce job-ready graduates. Students make a significant investment in their post-secondary education, and it is essential we do everything possible to give them a rewarding career at the end of their studies. By shifting the focus to performance, we will ensure taxpayer dollars are being used in the most responsible way possible.”

Demetrios Nicolaides, Minister of Advanced Education

“The University of Calgary has the ability to create the ‘arc to the future’ for Calgary and help re-imagine Alberta. The outcomes-based funding model is not only a tremendous opportunity to transform our post-secondary system, but to graduate a workforce that is capable of adaptation, with the skills and abilities to innovate and to support economic growth and diversification.”

Geeta Sankappanavar, chair, Board of Governors, University of Calgary

“We look forward to working with government to implement the new outcomes-based approach to funding. This approach should improve predictability in government funding levels and enhance accountability for results delivery, both of which will benefit our students.”

Dave Collyer, chair, Board of Governors, Bow Valley College

“Alberta’s post-secondary presidents welcome the opportunity to work with the Government of Alberta, our learners and other stakeholders in building a performance-based model that will enable us to achieve an overall vision for Alberta’s post-secondary system, that builds on the strengths and core mission of each institution, and that maximizes the quality of our learning and research environments so that learners and communities can reach their highest potential.”

Neil Fassina, president of the Council of Post-secondary Presidents of Alberta and president of Athabasca University

“Alberta’s students deserve an institutional funding model that is both modern and evidence-based. ASEC supports the changes made by the Government of Alberta towards a model that fits our values of transparency, accountability, affordability and predictability. We look forward to working with the government in the further development of the Campus Alberta Grant allocation.”

Emmanauel Barker, director, Government Relations and Advocacy, Alberta Students’ Executive Council

In addition to tying public investment to results, government is also transforming its relationship with post-secondary institutions by negotiating three-year funding agreements. Investment management agreements will include specific performance targets for each institution. They will also specify the government funding each institution will receive if they meet their performance targets. Three-year terms will help institutions plan for the future and build on their record of excellence.

The amount of funding tied to performance outcomes will begin at 15 per cent of operational funding for 2020-21 and gradually increase to a maximum of 40 per cent by 2022-23. A small number of performance measures will be introduced for the 2020-21 academic year, and more measures will be gradually introduced over the next three years to a total of about 15.

 Quick facts

  • Government provides operational funding to 26 universities, colleges and polytechnics every year, but historically, this funding has not been tied to any targets or outcomes. While government provides many different kinds of grants to post-secondary institutions, only operational funding through the Campus Alberta Grant will be tied to performance.
  • The MacKinnon Report identified that the current post-secondary funding structure does not link funding to the achievement of specific goals or priorities for the province, such as ensuring the required skills for the current and future labour market.
  • Outcomes-based funding is a global trend in higher education. About 35 U.S. states use a form of performance-based funding. Over the past 10 years, additional jurisdictions have implemented various methods of performance-based funding, such as the United Kingdom, Belgium, Spain, Portugal, Italy, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Poland, Australia, New Zealand and Hong Kong.
  • While performance measures will be finalized after discussions with post-secondary institutions, students and faculty, some examples may include:
    • graduate employment rate
    • median graduate income
    • graduate skills and competencies
    • work-integrated learning opportunities
    • administrative expense ratio
    • sponsored research revenue
    • enrolment (including potential targets for domestic students, international students and under-represented learners)
  • Performance measures will also be weighted differently depending on the institution. For example, different performance measures will be more important to different kinds of institutions.
  • Institutions that meet all of their targets will receive 100 per cent of their allocated funding.
  • If an institution does not meet its targets, the institution will receive funding that is proportionate to its level of achievement. For example, if an institution achieves 90 per cent of its target, it will receive 90 per cent of its funding for that target.

 

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Alberta

Just 35 dollars to see Jess Moskaluke and 10 of Alberta’s best recording artists at the 2020 ACMA Awards

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Jess Moskaluke

Pssssst….  Central Alberta… We’ll let you in on a little secret…

Here’s Ryan Langlois with the details…

You probably already know the Association of Country Music in Alberta is holding their 2020 Awards Show in Red Deer at the Cambridge Inn and Suites on the weekend of January 25 and 26.

You probably already know that Jess Moskaluke, one of Canada’s hottest Country Music stars is hosting and performing!

But here’s something most people don’t know yet… The ACMA Awards has started something new called The Fan Zone!

The ACMA’s are making it easier than ever for anyone to join in this incredible industry event and enjoy one of the most incredible musical experiences you’ll ever see in Red Deer (until next year’s Award Show).

Perhaps best of all… the tickets are incredibly affordable!!  For just 35 dollars, you can see all ten acts.. the awards show and speeches… AND..  you’ll be spoiled with a pre-show event sponsored by Hotels Red Deer… exclusively for the Fan Zone ticket holders!  A drink… snacks.. your own pre-show acoustic performance… And then there’s the Award Show itself!  More than 10 live performances, speeches from the winners, come see some of Canada’s best musical talent.. all for one amazing low price!!!

That’s right… We’re yelling this secret out.  Sorry.  We just don’t want you to miss out.

Click here for ticket information!  

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january, 2020

mon06jan(jan 6)8:00 amfri31(jan 31)12:00 amJanuary is Alzheimer's Awareness Month8:00 am - 12:00 am (31) Event Organized By: K. Jobs

sun12jan(jan 12)2:00 pmsun22mar(mar 22)5:00 pmAnne Frank: A History for Today opening at Red Deer MAG2:00 pm - (march 22) 5:00 pm mst Red Deer Museum & Art Gallery Address: 4525 - 47A Avenue, Red Deer

thu23jan(jan 23)6:00 pmsat25(jan 25)11:00 pmRed Deer Justice Film Festival6:00 pm - 11:00 pm (25) welikoklad event centre, 4922 49 St, Red Deer, AB T4N 1V3

fri24jan1:30 pm3:00 pmMonthly Mindfulness Drop-InMonthly Mindfulness Drop-In1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

mon27jan11:15 am1:15 pmLuncheon With Arlene Dickinson11:15 am - 1:15 pm Cambridge Hotel and Conference Centre, 3310 50 Avenue

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