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Alberta

Premier Notley announces Alberta’s most common baby names for 2018

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From the Province of Alberta

Olivia and Liam were Alberta’s most common baby monikers in 2018, while Harper, Elizabeth and James cracked the top 10 list for the first time in decades.

Alberta welcomed 50,104 babies into the world last year – 25,717 boys and 24,387 girls.  Olivia was the most popular name choice for baby girls for the fifth year in a row, with Emma and Charlotte close behind. Liam has reclaimed the top boy’s name in Alberta, taking the No. 1 spot back from Noah.  Noah dropped from first to third place in the boys’ names list, while Oliver jumped to the second most popular name spot.

“Congratulations to all the new parents, and welcome to all of our new Albertans. As these children grow up, they will shape our future. We are going to help make sure they get a great start, with thousands of affordable child care spaces across Alberta, stronger child and family benefits, and hundreds of new and modernized schools.”

Rachel Notley, Premier

Service Alberta recorded 13,363 different baby names in 2018.  From popular culture to nature, parents found name inspiration from a variety of sources.  Some of the more unique names appear to be inspired by Marvel comics (Loki, Thanos, Captain), Star Wars films (Kylo, Leia, Anakin), books from the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus), places (Ireland, Chicago, Venice), outer space (Galaxy, Jupiter, Moon) and gemstones (Amethyst, Sapphire, Onyx, Diamond).

Very interesting facts

  • Oliver climbed six spots to become the second most popular boys’ name.
  • James cracked the boys’ top 10 list for the first time since 1983.
  • Harper and Elizabeth appeared in the girls’ top 10 list for the first time since records began in 1980.
  • Tied names mean there are 12 names on the boys’ top 10 list, with Logan and Lucas both in the fifth spot, and Alexander and James tied for spot No. 10.
  • Parents have up to a year to register their children’s births. As a result, 2018 baby names lists and birth statistics may change slightly.
  • Albertans can look up more than 95,000 names dating back to 1980 through the Alberta Baby Names App, available for free download on iPhone, iPad and Android devices.
  • Baby names statistics are recorded by the Vital Statistics branch of Service Alberta, and are based on the registration and notice of birth information.
  • A complete list of names is available on the Open Government Portal.

Alberta’s top baby boy names

(In brackets is the number of children with each name)

Place
Boy Names (2018)
Boy Names (2017)
Boy Names (2016)
1 Liam (225) Noah (250) Liam (277)
2 Oliver (212) Liam (244) Benjamin (252)
3 Noah (199) Benjamin (229) Lucas (247)
4 Ethan (188) Logan (226) Oliver (230)
5 Logan (182)

Lucas (182)

Lucas (216) Noah (228)
6 Jacob (181) William (213) William (213)
7 William (178) Ethan (192) Ethan (205)
8 Benjamin (176) Oliver (190) Jack (197)
9 Jack (167) Jack (189) Lincoln (192)
10 Alexander (158)

James (158)

Jacob (178) Owen (189)

Alberta’s top baby girl names

(In brackets is the number of children with each name)

Place
Girl Names (2018)
Girl Names (2017)
Girl Names (2016)
1 Olivia (235) Olivia (236) Olivia (292)
2 Emma (230) Emma (215) Emma (249)
3 Charlotte (175) Charlotte (187) Sophia (215)
4 Emily (164) Ava (184)

Sophia (184)

Ava (207)
5 Ava (161) Emily (159) Emily (187)
6 Abigail (153) Abigail (154) Charlotte (180)
7 Harper (150) Amelia (149) Amelia (172)
8 Sophia (146) Isabella (141) Abigail (171)
9 Amelia (145) Aria (129)

Chloe (129)

Chloe (166)
10 Elizabeth (130) Lily (127) Aria (137)

Government announcement about Midwives in 2018

This year, more expectant parents than ever before chose a midwife to help support them before and after their baby was born. Of the more than 50,000 babies born in Alberta in 2018, nearly 3,600 parents received the support of a midwife, up from 2,400 three years ago.

“We know choosing the perfect name isn’t the only decision new parents face. We wanted all expectant parents to have more choices when it comes to their pre- and post-partum care, so we increased funding for midwifery and expanded their scope of practice. We recognize the compassion and expertise midwives provide to Alberta families at a key time in their lives. I’m pleased to see so many Albertans taking advantage of their support as they make their journey into parenthood.”

Sarah Hoffman, Minister of Health

Midwives serve families with low-risk pregnancies. Care starts during pregnancy and continues after birth. As part of Budget 2016, an additional $11 million was allocated for midwifery services over three years, for a total of $49 million.

The Government of Alberta also expanded midwives’ scope of practice, so they can prescribe, dispense and administer a broader range of prescription drugs, use ultrasound to determine fetal position, administer vaccines and insert intrauterine contraceptive devices. This brings the scope of practice for Alberta midwives in line with many other provinces and territories.

#visionCanada2119

All Canadians should know what this Calgarian is up to!

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#visionCanada2119

Submitted by Scott Cameron of Bassa Social Innovations 

Get to know your neighbour.

You might be surprised how they’re changing the world.

#visioncanada2119

I’ve known Steve for the past year. He’s one of the first guys I met when I moved to Calgary and, as part of a small group of friends, someone that I get together with quite regularly for group dinners, birthdays and vacations – spent an amazing few days on the west coast sailing with he and his wife earlier this summer. Until today, I only had a hint of what he does.

Steve is an entrepreneur and a passionate energy sector guy. Like many Canadians, I’ve tended to glaze over when these guys start talking about their work. I’m a social sciences and former government sector guy – I had energy sector guys in my family and never really conditioned myself to understand what they did. I decided to change that and chose to take an hour out of my day to visit Steve in his shop here in SE Calgary.

He had another visitor in the shop with him that morning. A fourteen-year-old, middle school student that learned about Crossfire (the name of the technology) from her parents and decided to investigate it as part of her science curriculum. I’m glad she did. She took me over to a whiteboard at the front of the shop and used the schematics already drawn to explain how Steve’s invention (Crossfire) makes it possible to use solar energy to power a small air compressor (93% efficient) that controls the pneumatic valves at natural gas and oil wells making it possible for the site to eliminate emissions. Cool.

I’m not even going to attempt any further explanation because, well, I’m a social sciences guy. I learned a few things as a result of my visit today – that Steve is one of many Canadians investing their life savings into entrepreneurial ventures to make the energy sector greener, that the political and policy environment appears to be working against these innovations, that innovations of this nature won’t just improve the sector here but is gaining traction globally, and that a fourteen-year-old student has the intellect to understand and explain the technology to an old guy like me (because I chose to listen).

I also heard, firsthand, how this work can be frustrating and “profoundly discouraging” when it feels like the systems are stacked against innovation and political responses are filled with rhetoric. Innovation feels like a nice idea but appears to be tough sell politically. For now, it’s the courageous entrepreneurs that are taking up the cause and making stuff happen.

I’m encouraged by Steve’s work and glad that he has such a keen mind and passion to improve efficiency in the sector. He notes that “when given the challenge, we rise to the occasion”. Imagine the country we’d be if we adopted that attitude across industries – and I don’t necessarily think we’re far from it. Remember, I’m a social sciences guy writing about innovation in the energy sector – imagine the impact if people from across sectors chose to align for the purpose of building a nation to support our people, our progress and our planet. We need to support one another. We need a new narrative Canada. Let’s build that narrative together at #visioncanada2119.

 

Bassa Social Innovations

Scott Cameron is the former Social Planning Manager at The City of Red Deer, and before that he was Executive Director of The United Way of Central Alberta.   He now lives in Calgary.

bassa Social Innovations is a values-based and principled consulting firm committed to positive social well-being for people, their families and their communities. We can help navigate the shared, and sometimes divergent perspectives of government, corporate, non-profit and community organizations to unravel social complexity, and explore collaborative and sustainable social change.

The term ‘bassa’ comes from the world of music, and basically means to play or sing an octave below what’s written. That’s how we describe our work – we work collaboratively to understand what isn’t obvious on the surface. The metaphor goes one step further…the bass note is the foundation of the chord and we seek to create foundational work that serves our clients in the present and future.

 

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#visionCanada2119

A patriot for independence

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I consider myself a patriot, I served in our military, I love my country and only wish the best for everyone. I was raised in a time when we were taught to always treat people with respect, and that they would reciprocate. I believe that this thinking is sort of timeless, so I suspect most Albertans would say they think the same way.

Unfortunately when it comes to government, and Alberta’s place in confederation, this hasn’t been the case. Albertans have given so much to our federal government in the way of the blood of our soldiers, the fruits of our labours, and all of this with only the expectation to be treated with respect in return.

As soldiers I like to think we held onto the highest ideals of what being a Canadian was. Canadian soldiers throughout our history have established a reputation for all of us to benefit from. A reputation of selfless individuals who stand on principle, honour, and willing to risk their lives in defence of those ideals.

I saw as my brothers came back from military actions overseas, who were and are still, treated in a manner that is so disrespectful that it makes me ashamed of what my country has become. I have mixed feelings, of sorrow in realizing the dream of what Canada was supposed to be has been abandoned by our political leaders, and at the same time disgust for those people, especially our Prime Minister. A man who has demonstrated time and again that he has no honour and although he holds the office of PM, I have nothing but contempt for the man.

This combined with the disregard I see him treat all Albertans with, is far too much to accept, and when faced with a moral dilemma, I always do my best to choose the side of right. This is how I was raised, this is how the Army helped to fashion me as a young man, and these aspects of my character will never change.

I don’t believe that we can continue with a system of government that is immoral, and think that we can make something good come out of it. Corrupt systems encourage corrupt people and practices. Vast sums of money have been used to secure votes in past federal elections, all for the sake of securing power.

Obviously ex soldiers are not a huge voting block, nor do they have a powerful lobby. They are however deserving of our respect as individuals, and shouldn’t have to take the government to court to receive benefits that were promised.

This is just another example of how our government seeks to please specific demographics. Those groups who can motivate or secure large blocks of votes, or garner massive amounts of media coverage in support of specific policies, or in support of the ruling party; they all get the personal attention of Trudeau.

I resent it when it’s mentioned that to suggest independence for Alberta is unpatriotic. My loyalty to the crown, or the flag, or my brothers in arms is strong, and is based upon my core loyalty to my family, friends and community. I can’t just sit idly by and watch as lives and families are destroyed all around me by bad government policy, and say nothing.

I know it is my duty that I must speak out against the injustice’s all Albertans are suffering through, and lend my voice to the many others that feel the same. When a government has become so corrupted that neglects it’s core responsibilities to disabled vets, or it discriminates against any region or group of people, then it is the duty of every citizen to work to replace that government.

To me the good of the people of Alberta is more important than our traditions, our national symbols, our laws, our government and especially our leaders. If they will not stand up for our families, our livelihoods, our future; then they are worse than lost, they are despicable.

The old uniform that still hangs in my closet brings back many memories and fills me with pride. Not that I did anything special, but pride in that I was blessed to be able to stand shoulder to shoulder among men of strong conviction. Men who understood the meaning of duty, honour, and sacrifice. Men who share a bond of brotherhood that most people never experience.

If Mr. Trudeau thinks that we Albertans will simply accept our lot in life, that we are no threat to his hold on power, and are for all intents and purposes irrelevant except for how he desires to use us; then I think it’s time that we show the world what Albertans are really made of.

We can and should chose self determination, stand up for ourselves, and become a free and independent nation. A nation that can become the envy of the free world. A nation that will help our neighbours break free from fear and embrace their own independence and chart their own destiny. A nation that does the right thing, and takes care of it’s own.

It’s time for us to stand up and do the right thing. It’s time to truly make Alberta Strong and Free.

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november, 2019

thu21novAll Daysun24Festival of Trees(All Day)

thu21nov6:00 pm11:00 pmFestival of Trees - Preview Dinner6:00 pm - 11:00 pm MST Westerner Park, 4847A-19 Street

fri22nov8:00 pm11:00 pmFestival of Wines8:00 pm - 11:00 pm MST Westerner Park, 4847A-19 Street

sat23nov9:00 am12:00 pmFestival Family Bingo - 1st time ever!9:00 am - 12:00 pm MST Westerner Park, 4847A-19 Street

sat23nov6:00 pm11:00 pmMistletoe Magic !6:00 pm - 11:00 pm MST Westerner Park, 4847A-19 Street

sat23nov8:00 pmRed Deer Nov 23 - Calgary's THIRD CHAMBER - EP release show "Harvesting Our Decay"8:00 pm

sun24nov9:00 am12:00 pmBreakfast with Santa9:00 am - 12:00 pm MST Westerner Park, 4847A-19 Street

mon25nov6:30 pm8:30 pmRustic Succulent Box WorkshopUnique Workshop to create Succulent Box6:30 pm - 8:30 pm

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