Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Agriculture

Local filmmaker’s “Nut Milking EXPOSED” video generates well north of 28 million views and growing

Published

on

If you like this, share it!




  • You need to see this!

    Nick Saik was born and raised in Central Alberta, surrounded on all sides by Agriculture.  A filmmaker by trade, Nick and his father, Rob, a successful author, movie producer, and agriculture advocate have been working for many years to apply Nick’s filmmaking skills to advocacy in the agriculture sector.

    One of Nick’s more recent productions, “Nut Milking EXPOSED”  is a truly inspired piece of work, regardless of what side of the “…should Nut milk actually be called milk?” argument you may be on.  It’s funny. And it’s really well-produced. And this world-class production from the mind of a gifted Central Albertan is being viewed all around the world.

    The actor looks into the camera and says with a straight face:

    “There’s so much confusion with city folks these days. They’re talking about ‘Nuts don’t lactate. Nuts don’t have a nipple.’ I’ll show you a nut nipple,” says the 3rd generation Nut Milker from the picturesque “Nut Milkery” he operates.

    The video comes to an end with the following:

    “There is a debate in the dairy industry: If nuts don’t lactate why is their juice called milk?” the video asks. “Definitions matter in the world of food. What defines milk for you?”

    “Besides the proximity I’ve had to it, Agriculture has always been a major draw for me,” says Nick Saik. “While I’m quite confident that I’m not cut of the same cloth that farmers are cut from, there is something in that lifestyle, and in those values that I can’t escape. My Dad Robert Saik made his living as a consultant to farmers. He’d spend the majority of his time helping farmers do more with the resources available to them. I think my investigative relationship with Agriculture is thanks to my Dad’s relationship with Agriculture.”

     

     

    ABOUT KNOW IDEAS MEDIA AND NICK SAIK

    The KNOW IDEAS mission is to entertain and inform audiences by presenting rationally optimistic, trustworthy, scientifically-based solutions to highly controversial subjects.

    The world has been crippled by meaningless controversy. We need answers, but pessimists aren’t the sort of people that tackle seemingly insurmountable problems. In response, the father and son team of Rob and Nick Saik champion a rationally optimistic approach to resolving the world’s challenges, and they use science as the common ground on which we all can meet.

    Despite often having very different views from very different generations, through their work Nick and Rob prove that important discussions are always most productive when they are based on scientifically tested facts, and are conducted in an honest and respectful manner.

    No one can pay Know Ideas to change its mind, it courageously follows proven scientific evidence to wherever it leads. Our first project, Know GMO is a demonstration of this commitment in that our funding has come directly from family farmers and we have intentionally avoided any support from any seed or chemical companies that could be seen to influence our findings.

    We post our sources. If we’ve said it we’ve checked it, and if it changes we’ll change too. If you’re looking for an information source you can trust on whether we should all go no GMO or pro-GMO, then join us for on our journey by watching our series Learn GMO.


    If you like this, share it!

    Agriculture

    Average family to pay $400 more for groceries next year, report estimates

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • The average Canadian family will pay about $400 more for groceries and roughly $150 more for dining out next year, an annual food price report predicts.

    Food prices will rise between 1.5 to 3.5 per cent in 2019, according to the report from researchers at the University of Guelph and Dalhousie University. That means the average family of four will spend $12,157 next year — up $411 from 2018.

    Vegetables will see the biggest price jumps — between four and six per cent for the category, according to the report.

    Meanwhile, meat and seafood prices are expected to fall, with the meat category to decline by one to three per cent and seafood costs to remain the same or fall up to two per cent.

    Since 2015, the team has predicted prices in those two categories would rise as high as six per cent each year.

    “This is a bit of a risk for us… We’ve never done that,” said Sylvain Charlebois, one of the lead researchers and a professor at Dalhousie University, referring to anticipating a decline.

    But the team is confident in its prediction.

    They believe there’s an oversupply of meat, he said, and Canadians are eating less animal protein. Instead, they’re showing more interest in alternative proteins, like quinoa and lentils.

    The plant-based protein trend is evident in recent manufacturer and restaurant moves as well.

    Meat processors Maple Leaf Foods Inc., for example, acquired two companies in this niche in recent years, Lightlife Foods and Field Roast GrainMeat Co.

    At the same time, fast food chains have started adding vegan and vegetarian options to their menus. A&W Food Services of Canada Inc. even temporarily sold out of its Beyond Meat patties shortly after adding them to its menu.

    Industry watchers have attributed the demand for plant-based protein to millennials, health-conscious baby boomers and concerns around antibiotic use in agriculture.

    A turning point for animal protein, though, was 2014 when beef prices started to rise dramatically, said Charlebois.

    Between December 2013 and December 2014 the monthly average retail price for one kilogram of ground beef rose more than 26 per cent, according to Statistics Canada data. For comparison, the price advanced about 3.5 per cent from December 2012-13. It reached a record high of $13.23 in October 2015.

    “It really spooked consumers,” said Charlebois, adding they started substituting plant-based protein into their diet.

    Butchers and grocers will likely take it easy on beef prices next year in an effort to bring people back to the red meat, he said.

    Consumers’ embrace of plant proteins will help push vegetable prices higher next year, as will the weather, according to the report.

    “Fruit and vegetables are some of the most perishable, fragile food products that are on the grocery shelf,” said Simon Somogyi, a lead researcher on the report and a University of Guelph professor.

    They’re particularly influenced by climactic events, like the El Nino expected to occur this winter, he said, which can result in warmer and drier conditions, and create shortages in the supply chain.

    As far as which vegetables may see the biggest increases, it’s difficult to know what produce item will become the next cauliflower, Charlebois said. The cruciferous vegetable saw soaring prices per head in 2016.

    Charlebois points to lettuce and tomatoes as possible candidates for big price fluctuations. Meanwhile, Somogyi said produce imported into Canada is more susceptible to weather events and the corresponding price changes.

    The report predicts more modest increases for bakery (one to three per cent), dairy (zero to two per cent), fruit (one to three per cent) and other food items, such as non-perishables, not covered by the other categories (zero to two per cent).

    Restaurant prices will rise between two and four per cent, according to the report, mainly because operators’ labour costs increased as several provinces and territories boosted their mandated minimum hourly wage recently.

    The researchers’ predictions for 2018 were fairly accurate. Fruit prices, which they estimated would rise between one to three per cent, stayed stagnant — the only category where they missed the mark.

    Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.

     

    Companies in this story: (TSX:MFI)

     

    Aleksandra Sagan, The Canadian Press


    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    Agriculture

    $1.75B in mystery money could let Ottawa to start compensating farmers soon

    Published

    on

    If you like this, share it!




  • OTTAWA — The federal government says it plans to spend $1.75 billion by March without having said what the money is for, though at least some of the cash is likely to go to farmers hurt by new trade deals.

    The government remains tight-lipped about how it will use the rest of the “non-announced” spending it allowed for in last week’s fall economic statement.

    In all, the government has made room for $9.5 billion worth of still-to-be-unveiled commitments over the next six years.

    A government source says some of that will go to dairy, egg and poultry producers, whose protected domestic markets were opened up to more foreign competition under new North American and Pacific Rim trade deals. The source, who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, spoke on condition of anonymity.

    The fall statement said the government is still talking with farmers and processors about compensation for the new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and the recently ratified Asia-Pacific trade pact known as the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

    The negotiations will determine the size of the final package and how the money will be rolled out over the coming years.

    In 2016, the Liberal government dedicated $350 million to help dairy producers deal with the impacts of Canada’s trade agreement with the European Union. The amount included a five-year, $250-million fund for milk producers and a second program worth $100 million for cheese-makers.

    Looking ahead, Ottawa is also facing litigation related to Indigenous issues, including land claims, that could draw on some of the money.

    Most of the yet-to-be announced funding has been dedicated to the later years of the projection, with $2.1 billion set aside for 2021-22, $1.85 billion for 2022-23 and nearly $2.8 billion for 2023-24.

    One possible use for the cash: national pharmacare.

    The governing Liberals have put together a group of advisers to consult Canadians and to explore options for a national program. The council is due to report in 2019, when the topic of pharmacare is likely to become an issue during the federal election campaign.

    A spokesman for Finance Minister Bill Morneau argued the list of the government’s funding commitments in the fall update is comprehensive.

    But Pierre-Olivier Herbert noted some measures cannot be disclosed yet due to cabinet confidentiality or because ministers have yet to make a decision. Issues of national security, commercial sensitivity, or litigation or certain matters related to trade agreements must also be kept under wraps, he said.

    “The net fiscal impact of these confidential or sensitive measures is rolled up and presented at an aggregate level and will be detailed in due time,” Herbert wrote in an email.

    Thanks to the stronger economy, Morneau had more than $20 billion in extra fiscal room over the coming years to work with, compared to the forecasts in last February’s budget. But he chose to announce new initiatives — including billions of dollars worth of tax incentives for corporate Canada — that will use up all that space and then some, contributing to slightly larger annual deficits beginning next year.

    The document contained Ottawa’s long-awaited plan to help the country compete with the U.S. for investment dollars. It came in response to major American tax and regulatory reforms that many in the business community warn have eliminated Canada’s edge as an investment destination.

    The package includes new write-offs that are expected to lower federal revenues by about $14 billion over the next half-decade all by themselves.

    The fall update also contains no timeline to eliminate the Liberals’ shortfalls, which are now projected to be higher than $18 billion in each of the next couple of years.

    The opposition Conservatives and some economists have criticized the Liberals for not providing a date to balance the budget. There are warnings the government could face big fiscal challenges when the next economic downturn arrives.

    After the 2015 election, the Trudeau government abandoned vows to run yearly shortfalls of no more than $10 billion and to balance the books by 2019. Instead, it has focused on reducing the net debt-to-GDP ratio — a measure of how burdensome the debt is — each year.

    Andy Blatchford, The Canadian Press



    If you like this, share it!
    Continue Reading

    december, 2018

    wed21nov - 21decAll DayAlberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum - Deck the Hall 31 Days of Giving-31 Days of giving(All Day) Event Organized By: Alberta Sports Hall of Fame and Museum

    sat15dec10:00 am- 4:00 pmParkland Garden Centre Craft and Market Sale10:00 am - 4:00 pm

    sat15dec12:00 pm- 6:00 pmArtisan Market Sale for Nuit Blanche Winter CarnivalArtisan Market12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

    sat22dec10:00 am- 4:00 pmParkland Garden Centre Craft and Market Sale10:00 am - 4:00 pm

    mon31dec - 1jandec 317:00 pmjan 1- 2:00 amBlack & White ballRed Deer\'s Party of the Year!7:00 pm - (january 1) 2:00 am

    mon31dec - 1jandec 317:00 pmjan 1- 1:00 amOne Eleven Grill New Year's Eve with Claude Godin and his Groove EnsembleCall 403.347-2111 to reserve for New Year7:00 pm - (january 1) 1:00 am

    Trending

    X