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Red Deer

Great vibes in the dressing room as RDC Queens Hockey squad gears up for new season

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6 minute read

From RDC Athletics

Tight-knit Hockey Queens ready to hit the ice in 2019-20

Queens Hockey Head Coach Kelly Coulter is thrilled about the 12 returning student-athletes and 11 new additions he has assembled for the 2019-20 Alberta Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC) Women’s Hockey season.

“The vibe in the dressing room is fantastic. The girls seem to really get along and care about each other,” he says. “They seem to be really connected so I think that bodes well on the ice for us as well.”

Goaltender Karlee Fetch is back to play her fifth-year after an outstanding bronze medal performance in last year’s playoffs. Bachelor of Science Nursing student Madison Fox will share the duties in net, after joining the Queens from the Pacific Steelers of the Junior Women’s Hockey League (JWHL).

“Karlee is really mature in her game and as a person, so I think she will be a very good role model for Madison in terms of prepping for games and being a student-athlete,” says Coulter. “Madison is a very good young goaltender who likes to compete, so it’s a very good tandem.”

Despite the absence of 2018-19 Second Team All-Conference defenceman Catherine Longchamps, the Queens have a solid returning group on the blue line. Victoria Johnston, Kirsten Baumgardt, Sydnee Decorby, Ashley Sutherland and Mariah McKersie are back at RDC. Bachelor of Science Nursing student Shelby Ballan is recovering from a lengthy injury, but will help the team. Joining the defensive corps are Wetaskiwin’s Abby Fonteyne, Glendon’s Brooke Skrypichayko and Spirit River’s Tessa Ross.

Jenessa Fournier, Camryn Wallan, Neisha Germann, Jessi-Lynn Sumaling, Mary Hirsch and Hannah Petrie return up front. Sydney Rowley, Brooklyn Rowley, Madison Sansom, Carissa Hogan, Tyra Anderson, Braxton Shawara and Red Deer’s Avery Lajeunesse join the forwards.

“Some of the student-athletes have been more dominant goal scorers on their teams, so we’re hoping that will parlay into this season,” says Coulter. “Character and compete level are common traits that we see with all of our players, which makes us extremely happy.”

Madison Sansom is one of those added offensive weapons. The first-year Open Studies student from Saskatoon recorded 12 goals and 20 assists in 25 games with the Battlefords Sharks of the Saskatchewan Female Midget AAA Hockey League (SFMAAAHL) a season ago. Another talented first-year forward, Carissa Hogan had 12 goals and 13 assists in 28 games with the Swift Current Wildcats, and Coulter views Hogan’s impact extending beyond the ice.

“We are finalizing our leadership group and we have seven girls – Camryn Wallan, Kirsten Baumgardt, Neisha Germann, Victoria Johnston, Sydnee Decorby, Ashley Sutherland and Carissa Hogan, a rookie on our team this year,” says Coulter. “That’s the group that we’re going to be working with, but we are open to adding more as we feel we have a lot of character in our room this year.”

The RDC Queens competed in six exhibition games, picking up three victories and some valuable playing time. The Queens defeated the SAIT Trojans 4-0, the Central Alberta Amazons 2-1 and the Olds College Broncos 3-1.

“Our girls have come in very good shape. The games that we’ve had in the exhibition season, we’ve been very happy with the compete level,” says Coulter. “They are an intelligent young group and are very willing to learn. We are trying to figure out some chemistry and how people play together.”

The Queens dropped a 3-1 decision to the Broncos, 5-2 game to the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns of U Sports, and a very close 1-0 contest to the defending champion MacEwan University Griffins, but they gained important preseason experience.

“The game that we played against MacEwan was a very good game. It had a lot of pace to it back and forth and I was happy that our girls were able to compete at that level,” says Coulter. “I think it helped our girls, especially the rookies, to see the pace and compete levels. MacEwan has been the champions for three years, so they’ve set the bar.”

The RDC Queens will open the season on Thursday, October 10 at 7:00 p.m. against the Broncos in Olds. Then 24 hours later, the Queens will host the Broncos at the Gary W. Harris Canada Games Centre.

“That should be a good series right off the bat,” says Camryn Wallan, a third-year forward from Beaverlodge. “We’re going to have to make sure that we use our speed, get pucks to the net and make sure we capitalize on our opportunities.”

After many practices, hours of training and six exhibition games, the RDC Queens are ready to begin the season.

“I’m excited to get started. We had our team builder on August 25 and 26, and we’ve been together for a while,” says Coulter. “All the girls are ready to compete.”

For more information on RDC Queens Hockey, the student-athletes, scores, and game recaps of conference games, please visit: rdcathletics.ca

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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Community

Kids need Connections and desperate kids in Central Alberta need your help now!

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Calling all Donors and Supporters

We need your help!

In these challenging times, children and families are isolated, struggling to cope and understand, and are forced to wrestle with other mental health issues. As a Youth HQ supporter, you play a key role in ensuring the well-being of the children and families we serve. Through you we are able to cultivate authentic, caring relationships, opportunities, and connections to create a sense of belonging among and between children, adults, and community. It is times like this that reveal our true heroes – you.

Kids need Connections – Every child deserves the chance to exceed beyond the circumstances that surround them. Through our dedicated staff team, amazing volunteers, and committed donors and supporters we have been able to adapt during these difficult times and continue to meet the needs of the children and families we serve. Like many charities, fundraising has been a daunting challenge for us.  Many of our annual events have been cancelled, altered and donations are down this year.

In an effort to address our funding challenge we are asking you to consider supporting us in our efforts through this “crowdfunding initiative”.

On Giving Tuesday, December 1st we are launching the Kids need Connections Crowd Funding Giving Campaign.

Check out and learn more about this initiative.  Visit the campaign page by CLICKING HERE or by visiting our website at www.youthhq.ca.

Once on the page, you will have three options to support this ground-breaking initiative:

    1. The most obvious is to contribute (thus the CONTIBUTE  button staring back at you when the page opens up!).
    2. While we are always happy to receive any donations folks are able to make, the biggest secret to the success of a Crowd Funding campaign is to create the crowd.  This is something that every one of us is able to do at absolutely no cost.  I’m asking you to share….share….share….and then share more!  We need to get this message out to all our networks if it’s going to be successful.  Share on social media, share by email, text the link to people who don’t use either (is there actually anyone who doesn’t use social media or email???)….whatever it takes to get this shared far and wide.  And when you share, make sure you compel those you’ve shared with to do the same.
    3. The final option is to do both….contribute to the campaign and then share it out to your various networks!

You literally hold the keys to the success of this initiative in your hands!  Please do everything you can to support our efforts in this campaign. Thanks for your continued support and thank you in advance for doing anything you can do to help our cause in this challenging time. And for making a difference … for kids’ sake.

QKIDS NEED CONNECTIONS

Boys and Girls Clubs ensure children and youth are connected to others and the world around them. We aim to cultivate authentic, caring relationships, opportunities, and connections to create a sense of belonging among and between children, adults, and community.

There are more than 1,500 children and youth in Red Deer looking for connections; a mentor or someone to look up to; a safe place to go and make friends; somewhere to feel valued and a sense of belonging.

10-year-old Jamie said “I haven’t seen my friends for months and can’t remember what some of them look like”.

11-year-old Michelle said “I thought I would never see my friends and the Club again, and then the Club came to me”.

Boys and Girls Clubs are adapting to these circumstances to help ensure Kids are Connected.  We need your help. Our funds are not adequate to meet the present need.

Please Share and/or donate!

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COVID-19

Part IV:  Clerical Errors Affect Real People!

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Medical clerical staff are significant workers in the health centres.

Not only do they support the doctors and nurses in their roles, but they also ensure accurate results which turn into statistical analysis for future treatment recommendations.

But consider the case of my mother, who was allegedly diagnosed with Covid 19 at a seniors’ home and consequently spent two weeks in isolation (quarantine) as per government policy.

Nearly two weeks later, a note was added to her file of which the content follows:

November 27, 2020

Dear Resident/Family Member

 

I am writing to you to confirm that we have had no other residents at …. test

positive for COVID-19. With that being said, we have taken many residents off isolation today

due to a clerical error from AHS that resulted in a false positive reporting.

The director of the facility ends the letter off with an interesting paragraph:

Please also know that the best defense against the spread of this virus are actions that are well

within each of our control: stay home as much as possible, practice physical distancing (2

metres)/ wash your hands regularly/ use good cough etiquette and avoid touching your mouth.

 

 Without playing the victim card, what is the consequence of this clerical error to the individual who made the error?

For my mother, she lost 2 weeks of her life isolated in her apartment with a hazmat suit, masks and gloves in front of her unit.  She could not receive visitors and was not able to see her family.

 

Like any senior, student, teacher or worker who may have received a false positive, they are not faceless or nameless.  Errors have real life consequences.

This marks the 5th time of isolation in the retirement home.  Of these 5 times, ALL were due to policy i.e. 2-week isolation for a negative test or returning from a trip to visit family.  While initially based on a positive indicator, this last circumstance was triggered by a hallway disinfection during which she had coughing symptoms and a test was administered.  It turns out the particular disinfectant used by the home may trigger a coughing reaction.

However, the test was conducted and the positive was overturned.  Mea Culpa.

I have to wonder what the clerical staff who erred received for their gaffe?  The note is not clear as to if the clerical error was on the part of the technician or the individual entering the results. Either is unacceptable-technical or clerical side.  Or the alternate questions, how many other people had their lives turned upside down due to the error?  We also have to wonder how many people were contact traced and as well had to isolate?

We can probably estimate that for each false positive, 5 people were requested to be tested and if the test was incorrect OR the clerical staff erred there could be as many as 50 false results that day.

Province wide, what was the impact on the daily fright report?  If again, 50 people were false, our daily numbers would fall.  Perhaps more results were incorrect?   We do not know, but we do know that peoples’ lives are not to be tampered with and such activities should not be merely accepted.

Extending the argument system-wide, it is these types of errors that continue widespread criticism of our response to the virus.  Clerical errors can cause elevated numbers and create more panic (and thereby justify more extreme measures) just as inaccurate or no reporting of other diagnosis such as the influenza and related deaths, suicides, automobile accident fatalities, drug overdoses due to depression and potential  prescription related deaths (#3 in the US).

It is well know by anyone who has undergone physiotherapy for shoulder or leg injuries that if your left arm is injured that you will over compensate on the right side.  Therefore as one limb heals, the other can also be injured leading to another cycle of physio.  The same principle should apply to our health system.

While Covid 19 is a ‘real’ virus with real world threat, it must be considered as part of a larger pie to give world citizens a balanced view of our national health threats else our go to strategy for health management is crisis instead of calm and long term nutritional and holistic approaches.

Clerical errors not withstanding, errors must be publicly acknowledged and corrected.  Incorrect positive tests (cases) must be modified and appropriate actions taken to ensure honesty in health reporting.  The citizens of our cities, provinces and countries deserve truth from our health providers and ministries.  Responsibility and accountability MUST be part of a responsible and responsive health system.

To take a quote out of context, “One small misstep for man, one large misstep for mankind.”

 

 

 

 

 

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december, 2020

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