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Leading cause of death in Alberta (BY A LONG SHOT) is “Unknown”. Why isn’t our next Premier talking about this?

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If you were to ask 10 random Albertans what the leading cause of death was in 2021, many would respond with either COVID-19, or perhaps cancer.  If they really pay attention to things like this they might say heart disease or maybe dementia (old age).

Lucky for us the Province of Alberta has made the cause of death statistics public since 2001.  If you’d like to see them, click here and download “Leading Causes of Death”. If you do, you’ll see that for 15 years in a row, from 2001 to 2015 the leading cause of death for Albertans was heart disease. Dementia makes a strong push toward the end of that time frame.  By 2016 dementia became the leading cause of death for the next 5 years in a row.  Here’s what the list of the top 10 causes of death looked like in 2019. That was the last year ‘before’ COVID-19 appeared on the list.

2019 Organic dementia 1 1997
2019 All other forms of chronic ischemic heart disease 2 1886
2019 Malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus and lung 3 1523
2019 Other chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 4 1159
2019 Acute myocardial infarction 5 1061
2019 Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, so described 6 678
2019 Accidental poisoning by and exposure to drugs and other biological substances 7 677
2019 Stroke, not specified as hemorrhage or infarction 8 602
2019 Diabetes mellitus 9 569
2019 Other ill-defined and unknown causes of mortality 10 522

Then along came COVID-19.  In 2020 dementia remained the leading cause of death for Albertans, but COVID-19 came charging out of nowhere to become the 6th most common cause of death.  It’s important to note though the stats say COVID-19 “identified”.  That makes it unclear whether COVID was THE cause, A cause, or A symptom.  The other interesting thing to note was that in 2020, suddenly “Unknown Causes” skyrocketed up to the fourth leading cause of death, outpacing even COVID.

2020 Organic dementia 1 2081
2020 All other forms of chronic ischemic heart disease 2 1897
2020 Malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus and lung 3 1563
2020 Other ill-defined and unknown causes of mortality 4 1464
2020 Other chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 5 1178
2020 COVID-19, virus identified 6 1084
2020 Acute myocardial infarction 7 1067
2020 Accidental poisoning by and exposure to drugs and other biological substances 8 920
2020 Diabetes mellitus 9 743
2020 Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, so described 10 670

In 2021 you might expect COVID-19 would leap into top place in the list of leading causes of death for Albertans. That’s not what happened.  COVID did climb from the 6th most common cause of death to the 3rd most common cause, but at the same time “Unknown causes of mortality” EXPLODED into the top position.

Looking back on the last 20 years before 2021 the number 1 cause of death ranged from a low of 1,581 people dying of heart disease in 2012, to a high of 2,018 people dying of dementia in 2020.  It was only 2020 when the number of people dying from any single cause topped 2,000 for the first time.

Then in 2021 a whopping 2,135 people died of dementia.  That would be enough to be the number one cause of death any other year since records have been kept. Except it wasn’t because in 2021 3,362 people died of unknown causes! Not only did “unknown causes” of death rise above that threshold of 2,100.  It DEMOLISHED that number.

2021 Other ill-defined and unknown causes of mortality 1 3362
2021 Organic dementia 2 2135
2021 COVID-19, virus identified 3 1950
2021 All other forms of chronic ischemic heart disease 4 1939
2021 Malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus and lung 5 1552
2021 Acute myocardial infarction 6 1075
2021 Other chronic obstructive pulmonary disease 7 1028
2021 Diabetes mellitus 8 728
2021 Stroke, not specified as hemorrhage or infarction 9 612
2021 Accidental poisoning by and exposure to drugs and other biological substances 10 604

It’s worth repeating, in 2021 “Unknown Causes” were responsible for the deaths of 3,362 Albertans! That’s over 50% more deaths than any of the leading causes since records have been made public!

Considering the Government of Alberta closed businesses, schools, and recreation centres for a virus responsible for 1,950 deaths in 2021 it is astounding that our media isn’t screaming and our government is not aggressively trying to figure out what caused the deaths of 3,362 Albertans!

It’s not just Alberta and Canada seeing this alarming trend.  In England officials are reporting an increase in excess deaths of over 15% compared to the 5 year average. ” Harley Street GP Charles Levinson told The Spectator that while “every slight bump or uptick in the Covid numbers demands endless column inches”, there had been “total silence from so many” on the “damning” overall death statistics. “

British health researcher John Campbell reveals the situation in England.

It used to be the media’s job to take the data and ask questions.  Somehow they’ve failed to recognize the significance of THE LEADING CAUSE OF DEATH sweeping much of the planet.

If you were unable to come up with your own questions when you watched John Campbell’s video, you might very much appreciate this commentary from Jimmy Dore.

After 15 years as a TV reporter with Global and CBC and as news director of RDTV in Red Deer, Duane set out on his own 2008 as a visual storyteller. During this period, he became fascinated with a burgeoning online world and how it could better serve local communities. This fascination led to Todayville, launched in 2016.

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COVID-19

WHO member states agree to develop legally-binding pandemic treaty

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Article submitted by The Counter Signal

By MIKE CAMPBELL

The World Health Organization (WHO) announced that member states inched closer to developing a legally binding global pandemic treaty.

WHO member states agree to develop legally-binding pandemic treaty.

“I welcome the agreement by @WHO Member States to develop a zero draft of a legally binding #PandemicAccord designed to protect the world from future pandemics and to continue discussions on the draft in February 2023,” said WHO CEO Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

The development follows a third meeting from WHO member states to develop a global pandemic treaty. The first meeting was in December 2021, and the second was in March 2022.

It’s unclear how the WHO’s pandemic treaty will affect its 194 member states, including Canada.

The WHO states the global pandemic treaty will determine future pandemic requirements for individual countries, such as lockdowns, and that these requirements will be “legally binding.”

The WHO says the treaty will be a “legal instrument, rooted in the WHO Constitution, designed to protect the world from future pandemics.”

Article 21 of the WHO’s constitution states the WHO has “authority to adopt regulations concerning (a) sanitary and quarantine requirements and other procedures designed to prevent the international spread of disease.”

“Other procedures” presumably include global vaccine passports, which member states have already supported.

However, the WHO also claims the pandemic treaty will “respect sovereignty.”

The draft that resulted from this third meeting includes a provision that reads:

“States have, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law, the sovereign right to determine and manage their approach to public health, notably pandemic prevention, preparedness, response and recovery of health systems pursuant to their own policies and legislation provided that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to other States and their peoples.”

Conservative MP Leslyn Lewis has been outspoken regarding the potential impact a global pandemic treaty could have on Canadians.

In April, she said the treaty would allow the WHO to determine what a pandemic is and when one is occurring — even over something non-viral like an obesity crisis.

Earlier this year, the WHO and the German health minister said that countries disobeying regulations dictated by the WHO through their pandemic treaty might need to be sanctioned.

The Counter Signal contacted the WHO for comment but did not receive a response by publication.

Sign Our Petition Against The Treaty HERE

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Alberta

Two deputy chief medical officers resign from their positions with Alberta Health

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Edmonton – Alberta’s two deputy chief medical officers of health are leaving their roles — less than a month after Dr. Deena Hinshaw was removed as the province’s top doctor.

Health Minister Jason Copping confirmed during question period Wednesday that both of the doctors have submitted letters of resignation.

“They are still continuing to work at this point in time,” he said in the legislature. “We are in the process of actually looking to fill those roles.”

A statement from Alberta Health said Dr. Rosana Salvaterra and Dr. Jing Hu, who are listed as public health physicians on the department’s website, have given notice.

When reached by her department email, Salvaterra responded: “Unfortunately, we are not able to comment.”

She later added that she respects and admires both Dr. Hinshaw and Dr. Hu.

“They are brilliant, hard-working, and compassionate public health physicians and I consider myself fortunate to have had the opportunity to work alongside them for these past 14 months.”

Salvaterra, who has extensive public health experience including as the medical officer of health for Peterborough, Ont., joined the office in October 2021.

Her career in public health includes work in “the COVID-19 response, mental health, the opioid response, women’s health, poverty reduction, health equity, community food security and building stronger relationships with First Nations.”

Hu’s out-of-office message said her “last day at work with Alberta Health was Nov. 18, 2022,” and noted she wouldn’t have access to the department email after that date.

She got extensive training in China and at the University of Calgary before joining the health department in January 2020.

Their resignations came within a month of Hinshaw, who became the face of Alberta’s public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic, being removed from her position.

Hinshaw was replaced by Dr. Mark Joffe, a senior executive member of Alberta Health Services, on an interim basis.

“Dr. Joffe will be supported by medical officers of health within AHS, by other staff in the Office of the Chief Medical Officer of Health, and by the Public Health Division,” said the statement from Alberta Health late Wednesday.

“We expect these changes to have no impact on the department’s and Dr. Joffe’s ability to meet the requirements of the Public Health Act.”

Hinshaw’s dismissal didn’t come as a surprise.

Premier Danielle Smith announced on her first day in office in October that she would be replaced.

Smith has made it clear that she blames both Hinshaw and Alberta Health Services for failing to deliver the best advice and care for Albertans as the hospital system came close to buckling in successive waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“A lot of the bad decisions were made by Alberta Health Services on the basis of bad advice from the chief medical officer of health,” Smith told reporters on Oct. 22.

Smith has not placed the blame on front-line doctors and nurses but broadly on AHS senior management. Joffe, while serving as chief medical officer of health, retains his role in AHS senior management as a vice-president responsible for areas in cancer and clinical care.

Hinshaw, an Alberta-trained public health specialist, became a celebrity of sorts in the first wave of the pandemic in the spring of 2020, as she delivered regular, sometimes daily, updates to Albertans on the virus, its spread and methods to contain it.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Dec. 7, 2022.

— By Colette Derworiz in Calgary.

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