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Frightening incident in southern Alberta: Suspects impersonating police officers commit robbery

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From High River RCMP

High River RCMP investigate police impersonators

High River, Alta. – The High River RCMP are investigating a report of two individuals impersonating police officers on April 20, 2019. Public assistance is being sought in identifying the suspects responsible.

At approximately 5:00 p.m. a male victim was driving on 498 Avenue near highway 2A, when a dark grey Ford SUV (possibly Explorer) activated what appeared to be police lights, causing the victim to pull over. The victim assumed the two occupants of the vehicle were police officers.

Two males approached the victim and asked for licence and registration. The suspects told the victim they needed to search the vehicle and asked the victim to step outside. The suspects took an undisclosed amount of cash from the victim’s vehicle and drove away.

Suspect #1 is described as tall, muscular, clean cut hair and wearing sunglasses, blue pants and a grey shirt.

Suspect #2 is described as medium build, average height and was a wearing RCMP baseball cap.

Both suspects spoke with heavy accents and may have been of Romanian descent.

High River RCMP encourage any members of the public who have information in relation to this incident or any other crimes to contact the High River RCMP Detachment at 403-652-2357 or your local police. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.”

High River RCMP would also like to remind the public that all police officers conducting a traffic stop or arrest will have proper police identification that can be verified with a call to 911.

Top Story CP

Implementation of Divorce Act reforms delayed eight months by pandemic

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OTTAWA — Highly anticipated reforms to Canadian divorce law have been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The reforms were to have gone into effect on July 1 but Justice Minister David Lametti says that has been pushed back to March 1, 2021.

He says courts across the country are currently hearing only urgent family law matters during the pandemic as they attempt to abide by restrictions to stem the spread of the virus.

Lametti says that, combined with how much governments are focused on the health crisis, has made it impossible to take the steps needed to implement the reforms.

Postponing the changes was decided in consultation with provincial and territorial governments, who Lametti says need time to adjust their own laws and regulations to be compatible with the federal reforms.

The reforms, which will apply only to legally married couples, are aimed at putting more emphasis on the interests of the child in custody decisions and would for the first time require the courts to take into account any instances of family violence.

“We understand how important the changes to the Divorce Act are to Canadians affected by separation and divorce, especially to vulnerable family members,” Lametti said in a statement Friday.

“We are working hard with our partners to implement these changes.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an increase in domestic abuse as schools and workplaces shut down and Canadians isolated themselves at home.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 5, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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Top Story CP

Implementation of Divorce Act reforms delayed eight months by pandemic

Published on

OTTAWA — Highly anticipated reforms to Canadian divorce law have been postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The reforms were to have gone into effect on July 1 but Justice Minister David Lametti says that has been pushed back to March 1, 2021.

He says courts across the country are currently hearing only urgent family law matters during the pandemic as they attempt to abide by restrictions to stem the spread of the virus.

Lametti says that, combined with how much governments are focused on the health crisis, has made it impossible to take the steps needed to implement the reforms.

Postponing the changes was decided in consultation with provincial and territorial governments, who Lametti says need time to adjust their own laws and regulations to be compatible with the federal reforms.

The reforms, which will apply only to legally married couples, are aimed at putting more emphasis on the interests of the child in custody decisions and would for the first time require the courts to take into account any instances of family violence.

“We understand how important the changes to the Divorce Act are to Canadians affected by separation and divorce, especially to vulnerable family members,” Lametti said in a statement Friday.

“We are working hard with our partners to implement these changes.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an increase in domestic abuse as schools and workplaces shut down and Canadians isolated themselves at home.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 5, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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june, 2020

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