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“Excessive Risk Aversion” Red Deer South MLA calls for less fear and more freedom and hope in the battle against COVID19

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A message from Red Deer South MLA Jason Stephan

This week I stood in the Alberta Legislature making a Member Statement sharing the sentiments of many constituents in Red Deer which I share.

Lockdowns and shutdowns destroy livelihoods, undermining long term mental and emotional health. Young adults and our children, generally at lower risk from COVID, can be particularly vulnerable, and need to see less fear and excessive risk aversion and more freedom and hope.

The statement:

Please find attached the full text of the Member Statement with the references to the Speaker removed. The video of the member statement is available here:

I am blessed to be the father of two adult sons and a teenage daughter who I love.

Like many parents, I am concerned about the impact health orders are having on the mental health of our children.

I feel job watching my sons become independent of their parents, to seek happiness as the individually see fit.

Yet, like many parents, I see the work and effort of young adults threatened by calls for lockdowns with devastating economic consequences.

This ought not to be.  Some of the loudest voices calling for lockdowns, will not lose a penny of pay, while those impacted may lose it all.

COVID should be respected; but children are low risk – not a single school age child has died from COVID in Alberta.  Yet, there is excessive risk aversion – a single positive COVID case in a high school should not result in 118 other students sent home to isolate, just because they were in the same class, notwithstanding physical distancing is respected, with good health and no symptoms.

School sports, colleges and universities are too shut down.

There is excessive risk aversion and fear – with negative long-term health impacts for children and young adults at low risk from COVID.

There needs to be a principled vision of hope.

The WHO defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

Orders, lockdowns and shutdowns are not healthy – imposing long term physical, mental and social health costs, especially on our children.

Click this link to see this statement as it was made in the Alberta Legislature: https://www.facebook.com/JasonStephanMLA/videos/137607104371116/

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Alberta

Deadline day for inquiry's final report on eco groups and Alberta energy industry

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EDMONTON — Friday was the deadline for a public inquiry into what the Alberta government says is foreign funding of environmental groups who want to curtail energy development — an investigation lauded by Premier Jason Kenney as principled but derided by critics as a buffoonishly sinister political witch hunt.

“We have not yet received the (final) report but expect to have it delivered to the minister’s office sometime today,” Jerry Bellikka, chief of staff to Energy Minister Sonya Savage, said in an email.

The inquiry was given five deadline extension stretching back a year to July 30, 2020. Its budget was set at $2.5 million, but later increased to $3.5 million.

Savage has up to three months to release the report once she receives it from forensic accountant Steve Allan.

Kenney launched the inquiry in 2019, fulfilling a United Conservative election campaign promise. He accused Canadian environmental charities of accepting foreign funding in a co-ordinated attempt to hinder energy infrastructure and landlock Alberta’s oil to benefit U.S. competitors.

Kenney recently said he was not surprised eco-groups are criticizing the inquiry as unfair and tilted toward a prejudged outcome

“They don’t want the public to realize they have been receiving massive amounts of money from foreign sources to shut down the largest job-creating industry in Canada,” Kenney said on July 22.

“They don’t want the disinfectant of transparency to come down on them. That’s why they went to court … Thankfully, the Court of Queen’s Bench threw their case out.”

In May, a judge dismissed a challenge by the environmental law firm Ecojustice to quash the inquiry. The judge ruled Ecojustice failed to prove the inquiry was called to intimidate charities concerned about the environmental impact of the energy industry.

In recent days, leaked sections of Allan’s draft report show he has concluded that eco-groups have not in any way broken the law. But critics say Allan exceeded his mandate by linking any opposition to resource development as being “anti-Albertan.”

Allan, in a letter this week to Greenpeace Canada, made it clear that “anti-Alberta” is meant simply as a “a non-pejorative geographic modifier.”

University of Calgary law professor Martin Olszynski said “anti-Alberta” is not an innocent term but a broad-based slur, easily weaponized by political opponents. He said it turns those concerned with the pace of resource development and its effect on the environment into scapegoats and depicts them as traitors to the community.

“The precedent (is) anything can become anti-Alberta, essentially anything that the premier disagrees with,” said Olszynski.

“To some extent a government has a democratic mandate, but it only goes so far. It can’t go to the point where opposition to that mandate –dissent — is branded as treason and sedition.

“That’s very authoritarian.”

The inquiry has been criticized for operating in secret: no witnesses called publicly, little to no evidence on its website and those investigated being given little time late in the game to respond. Its terms of reference have also been altered twice.

“This has been something out of ‘Alice in Wonderland,’” said Keith Stewart, a senior energy strategist with Greenpeace Canada. “We got funding from international foundations. It was about two per cent of our revenue over a decade.

“We got a lot more money from Albertans.”

He said Greenpeace Canada has been one of the inquiry’s targets and that letters to Allan asking for information and details have been ignored.

“We don’t even get to publicly defend ourselves or even see the evidence against us. (Allan) says, ‘I interviewed 100 people.’ He won’t tell us who they were. How are we supposed to respond to evidence that we’re not allowed to see?”

Allan, on his website, noted that his inquiry sent out 40 invitations in mid-June for participants to respond by mid-July. 

“Some participants did not accept the commissioner’s invitation until some weeks after June 18, and they were then granted access to the (inquiry) dataroom to review content,” Allan said in a statement July 21.

“The material provided to each party for review included material necessary to understand the context surrounding potential findings and contained potential findings related to them.”

Olszynski said there’s a “good chance” Allan’s final report will be challenged in court on the grounds it was procedurally flawed and reached unqualified conclusions.

“Inquiries are not courts of law … but it’s not the Wild West,” he said.

Kathleen Ganley, energy critic for the Opposition NDP, said Savage should release the report immediately upon receiving it.

“Leaked drafts of the report show the inquiry relied on misinformation found in Google searches and ‘research’ conducted by the UCP’s own ridiculous war room,” said Ganley.

“But despite putting their thumb on the scale with this shoddy research, the inquiry was still forced to conclude there was no wrongdoing or illegal activity.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021.

Dean Bennett, The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Imperial Oil earns $366 million; Kearl oilsands site sets 25-year production record

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CALGARY — Imperial Oil Ltd. says it earned $366 million in the second quarter and boosted production to its highest level in 25 years for the same period.

The Calgary-based company says it earned 50 cents per share in the three months ended June 30, compared with a net loss of $526 million or 72 cents per share in the same period of 2020. 

However, its second quarter earnings declined from the first quarter of 2021, when it earned $758 million. Its cash flow from operating activities in the second quarter was $852 million, down from $1.05 billion in the first quarter of 2021.

Imperial attributed the decrease to significant planned turnaround activity, weaker downstream margins and foreign exchange rates. 

The company says its production for the second quarter averaged 401,000  boe per day, the highest second quarter production in more than 25 years. It says its Kearl oilsands mine in northern Alberta completed a major planned turnaround in the quarter and also established a new single-month production record of 311,000 boe per day in June.

Imperial says lingering effects of the weak 2020 business environment and the COVID-19 pandemic continued to have a negative impact on the company’s financial results in the first half of 2021, but strengthening crude oil prices mean the outlook is improving.

“The decisive actions Imperial took throughout the pandemic to accelerate structural business improvements have enabled the company to recover strongly,” CEO Brad Corson said in a release. 

“Imperial has significant momentum entering the second half of the year and is well-positioned to continue delivering on its commitments.”

West Texas Intermediate averaged US$62.22 per barrel in the first six months of 2021, up from US$36.66 per barrel in 2020.

Corson says with major turnarounds at Kearl and the company’s Strathcona Refinery complete, Imperial can turn its attention to increasing production, increasing refinery utilization, and returning cash to shareholders.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 30, 2021.

Companies in this story: (TSX:IMO)

The Canadian Press

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