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Alberta

Update 1: Devon RCMP looking to the public for help in disappearance of Kathleen Rose Ferraz-Duchesneau of Devon

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UPDATE #1:

Jan. 16, 2019

Devon RCMP seeking public assistance in locating missing female

Devon, Alta. – Devon RCMP continue to investigate the disappearance of Kathleen Rose Ferraz-Duchesneau (25) of Devon.

On Jan. 6, 2019 at 11:10 p.m. Kathleen’s vehicle was located, abandoned, south of the Devon Bridge.  Kathleen has not been located since the discovery of her vehicle.

To date, the RCMP have been following up on all tips provided, unfortunately no viable information or sighting has resulted.  Local businesses have been solicited for any video surveillance, and local homeowners have been requested to check their property for any information that may lead to her whereabouts.  Several RCMP units and detachments are involved and working collaboratively to explore all avenues of investigation. The RCMP continue to liaise with various community search groups.

There has not been sufficient evidence at this point for the RCMP to have made any determination that this is a criminal incident.

“I know that everyone wants to help find Kathleen, so I’m asking the public to assist by providing the RCMP information and allowing us to do our investigational job” says Sergeant Jolene Nason of the Devon RCMP.  “The public is welcome to conduct searches in open, public areas but should not be going on private property where they may be alarming homeowners and putting themselves in unsafe situations.”

If you have seen Kathleen or have any information on her whereabouts, please contact Devon RCMP at 780-987-3414. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.

 

BACKGROUND

Jan. 7, 2019

Devon RCMP seeking public assistance in locating missing female

Devon, Alta. – Devon RCMP are seeking the publics assistance in locating Kathleen Rose Ferraz-Duchesneau (25) of Devon.

On Jan. 6, 2019, at approximately 11:10 p.m., Kathleen’s vehicle was observed parked and running in the medium, between the north and south bound lanes, just south of the Devon Bridge.

Kathleen is described as:

  • Caucasian
  • 5’ 5” tall
  • 240 lbs
  • Green eyes
  • Blondish/brown hair
  • Possibly wearing glasses
  • Possibly wearing purple jacket with white fur around the hood
  • Blue jeans

 

There is a general concern for Kathleen’s safety and well-being. If you have seen Kathleen or have any information on her whereabouts, please contact Devon RCMP at 780-987-3414. If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online atwww.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.

President Todayville Inc., Honorary Colonel 41 Signal Regiment, Board Member Lieutenant Governor of Alberta Arts Award Foundation, Director Canadian Forces Liaison Council (Alberta) musician, photographer, former VP/GM CTV Edmonton.

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Alberta

Alberta paleontologists find dramatic change in bite force as tyrannosaurs matured

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Tyrannosaurs are well known as having been ferocious predators at the top of the food chain millions of years ago, but a study led by an Alberta-based researcher shows the reptiles didn’t start out life that way.

François Therrien, curator of dinosaur paleoecology at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, Alta., said the study focused on tyrannosaur teeth and their dramatic change as they matured. 

He collaborated with Darla Zelenitsky and Jared Voris of the University of Calgary, as well as Kohei Tanaka of the University of Tsukuba in Japan.

For the study, published this week in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, the researchers examined the lower jaws from the Albertosaurus and Gorgosaurus, types of tyrannosaurs commonly found in Canada that predated the T. rex by millions of years.

“Our fossil records for those two species of tyrannosaurs is excellent,” Therrien said about the collection at the museum.

“We have so many specimens of those … that represent a full growth series from very young individuals that were probably three or four years of age all the way to fully grown adults that were over 20 years of age.”

By examining a wide range of fossils, the researchers were able to see a significant change in tooth size and jaw force once the tyrannosaurs reached about 11 years of age.

Feeding behaviour did not appear to change during the lifespan of the tyrannosaurs, because their jaws were adapted to capturing and seizing prey with their mouths, probably because the forelimbs were too short to grasp food, Therrien said. 

“Tyrannosaurs were truly unique when you look at all the theropods,” he said. “They were atypical … because their bite and their skulls were their main weapon for killing prey.”

But what did change, he said, is the size of their teeth and their bite force.

A tyrannosaur at about three years of age was still a deadly predator, but it had smaller blade-like teeth that could only slice through flesh. The bite force, Therrien added, was about 10 per cent that of a fully grown alligator.  

That means younger tyrannosaurs ate smaller prey and had to compete with other like-sized predators such as the Velociraptor. 

Once tyrannosaurs turned 11, Therrien explained, they went through a growth spurt in which their teeth became larger and wider. By the time the reptiles were fully grown, their bite force was eight times more than that of an alligator. 

And that meant their diets also changed. 

“These teeth were better adapted for resisting twisting stresses either associated with biting of big prey or even crushing bone.”

Therrien said his study shows that young tyrannosaurs were distinct predators that occupied different ecological niches.

“Young tyrannosaurs were not just scaled-down versions of the mature parents,” he said. “They were creatures that actually had their own lifestyles.”

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 23, 2021. 

Daniela Germano, The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Construction begins on new Alberta solar farm, Amazon to purchase power

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CALGARY — Amazon announced Wednesday it will purchase power from a massive new solar farm in Alberta, marking the e-commerce giant’s second renewable energy investment in Canada.

Construction began Wednesday on Travers Solar, a $700-million, 465-MW project southeast of Calgary, which its developers say will be the largest solar photovoltaic project in Canada and one of the largest in the world.

Privately held Greengate Power Corp. of Calgary says the solar farm will consist of 1.3 million solar panels and will provide enough electricity to power more than 100,000 homes by 2022.

Amazon, which has signed a deal to buy up to 400 MW of electricity from the project, previously announced plans to purchase power from an 80-MW solar farm in southern Alberta as part of its commitment to being fully powered by renewables by 2030.

Renewable electricity companies have credited Alberta’s unregulated electricity market for a recent boom in solar projects in the province.

Other projects include the 300-MW Blackspring Ridge Wind Project, which is now owned by French firm EDF EN and Enbridge Inc. of Calgary, and the proposed 130-MW Claresholm Solar project, a joint venture between Capstone Infrastructure and Obton, a Danish investment company.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published June 23, 2021.

The Canadian Press

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