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Calgary

The Secret To The Joe Rogan Podcast

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9 minute read

Joe Rogan may not have a University degree, but he has ingested far more information than he would have otherwise received with even a Master’s degree. When you can read, and you have an open mind, it’s amazing how much you can learn.  Of all the books Joe has read, I’m willing to bet he’s spent some time with Dale Carnegie’s, “How to Win Friends, and Influence People”.   Being well-read though is only one part of what has made The Joe Rogan Experience Podcast, the most successful podcast on earth. Joe has a larger audience than any show on Fox, CNN, MSNBC, CBS, or any other major network.  Joe doesn’t just have the largest Podcast, he has the largest audience…period. 

Inspired at least in part by Joe Rogan, myself and millions of other people have been trying to emulate his success by starting our own Podcasts.  It doesn’t matter what the topic, somewhere there is a Podcast talking about it.  Whether you’re interested in ceramic figurines, ten pin bowling, astronomy, or quilting, there is a Podcast for you…and it’s usually FREE!  

Much to the disappointment of many Joe Rogan emulators, their Podcasts usually fall far short of their expectations. Instead of amassing an audience of millions, they discover that they are lucky to have an audience of dozens.  Due to these unfavourable results, the vast majority of podcast hosts give up, fold up their tent, sell their gear on kijiji, and pretend their failure never happened.  Most who fail never fully understand WHY they failed, or how to fix it.  Here are some considerations for you, if you wish to either start your own podcast or re-launch a stagnant one. 

First, let’s be honest…Joe had a head start. It’s a lot easier to succeed at a Podcast if you already have a following who is interested in your opinions. Gaining a following is the toughest part, so if you’re going to make it, you’re going to have to earn your audience…it won’t just happen on its own, nor will it happen by accident. Although pre-existing notoriety is a significant bonus, it’s only part of the recipe. Numerous late-night hosts have started their own podcasts, only to discover that their late-show talent doesn’t translate to their podcast talent.  Despite their running start, these celebrities have not been successful in transitioning their existing audience to the podcast format.  Here’s what they’re missing. 

 

People hang out with people they like and trust.  When you tune in to the Joe Rogan Experience (JRE) you don’t feel like you’re being force-fed a contrived narrative, instead, you feel like you’re chatting with a good friend. Listening to the JRE is like having a virtual coffee shop chat with the most interesting people on the planet, who have interesting ideas. In contrast, listening to the news feels like we’re being told what to think, and how to behave. A newscast pretends to be the unsullied purveyor of truth, though in recent years the credibility of this claim has been eroded worse than the wheel wells of a 1973 Chevy truck.  We don’t trust the news, because they have proven themselves to be untrustworthy.  

Joe doesn’t tuck us into the fold by proclaiming that he is the holder of the truth.  Instead, Joe takes us on a journey of curiosity and shows us how to ask meaningful questions about interesting topics. Mr. Rogan models what it is to set your ego aside, and be open to the truth, whatever that may be.  Being proven wrong is a Freddy Kruger level nightmare for many people, and they’ll fight to be right till their last breath.  Joe shows us a different way, the way of courageous curiosity. 

The skeptic is forever looking through the lens of “What’s wrong with this picture?”  A person who chooses curiosity over skepticism looks through the lens of “What’s the truth of this picture?”  Joe’s rare ability to disconnect from the outcome, and just follow the evidence is part of his magnetic charm. He earns our trust, by being willing to admit when he is wrong, and by rarely stating his opinions as facts. Joe doesn’t actually “know” much, but he is aware of much. He follows the Socratic philosophy of, “the only true wisdom, is in knowing you know nothing”. On most topics, Joe’s just guessing, as are the rest of us and he doesn’t try to hide it. 

All of the above culminates to: Rule#1. Dig for the truth, not for validation that you are right. 

 

Rule #2.  Prioritize substance over bling.  

A client of mine is a sales rep for Bacardi. He once told me that with enough money thrown into a marketing campaign, you can sell a whole lot of any liquid, but only for a short time.  If it tastes like skunk piss, the marketing campaign will only yield short term success.  For long term success, there must be quality in the substance of your message, not just clickbait.  

Having celebrities on your show doesn’t hurt, …but it’s not as important as the topics you discuss. If you’re not going to say anything original, then at least convey your thoughts in an original way.  Ride the waves or relevance by being quick to discuss trending topics, but ensure to pose meaningful questions, and get beyond the surface of a story. 

 

Rule #3.  Respect your audience

Respecting your audience, means being a professional. Being a professional, means being prepared.  Provide your audience with decent quality audio for starters. If you don’t have a good quality microphone, you better have exceptional skills as an orator and be extremely likable for the audience to overlook your audio shortcomings.   If you are interviewing a guest, have a plan.  Make sure your launch straight into an engaging first question. The first question sets the tone, and the pace for the rest of the interview.  If you get off to a slow start, it’s tough to recover. 

 

Rule #4.  Be 100% honest and transparent. 

Like selling piss in a bottle, if you put out clickbait, your success will be short-lived.  It’s difficult to gain the trust of an audience, but it’s very easy to lose that trust. You won’t get more than a second chance at best, so resist the temptation to B.S. your audience. 

 

***disclaimer*** parody doesn’t count, as long as your work is clearly a parody. EG: My recent “Trump” interview was a parody done with a professional impersonator, but some people thought it was real.  The show notes have all the contact information for the impersonator, to ensure I’m not accused of violating Rule #4. 

 

Mark Meincke
Redline Real Estate
403-463-4313
Buy the Home Seller’s Bible by clicking HERE

Buy “Why not Me?” HERE

Meincke Show Podcast

 

 

For more stories, visit Todayville Calgary

Alberta

Police say toddler’s death in southeast Calgary being treated as suspicious

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Police say they are investigating the death of a toddler in southeast Calgary.

Emergency crews were called to a home in the community of Midnapore around 2:15 a.m. Thursday and found a two-year-old girl in medical distress.

Police say the child was taken to hospital by ambulance but later died.

They say the toddler’s death is being treated as suspicious.

Detectives are interviewing people to try to determine what happened before the child’s death.

An autopsy is to be done Friday morning.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 29, 2022.

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Alberta

‘Ludicrous’: Prosecutor questions testimony of teen in Calgary hit-and-run cop death

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By Bill Graveland in Calgary

A prosecutor suggested Wednesday a teen charged with first-degree murder in the hit-and-run death of a Calgary Police Service officer had no reason to believe he was in danger.

Sgt. Andrew Harnett died in hospital on Dec. 31, 2020, after being dragged by a fleeing SUV and falling into the path of an oncoming car.

The alleged driver, who cannot be identified because he was 17 at the time, has testified he was scared when Harnett and another officer approached the vehicle during a traffic stop and he saw Harnett put his hand on his gun.

But during cross-examination, Crown prosecutor Mike Ewenson played the body-camera footage of the stop. He asked the accused, who is now 19, if there was any proof Harnett was being threatening or insulting during the routine traffic stop.

“You brought up George Floyd in your direct examination. Do you remember what happened to George Floyd?” Ewenson asked.

The accused replied: “He got pulled out of the vehicle and I think they stepped on his neck … and he said he couldn’t breathe.”

Floyd was a Black man who was killed during an arrest by Minnesota police on May 25, 2020.

During testimony Tuesday, the teen testified he and his friends had discussed the Floyd case on social media.

“Let’s talk about what we just saw with Sgt. Harnett if we could, because you’re bringing this up at a trial that involves his death,” said Ewenson. “Any abusive language from him?”

“No,” the teen replied.

“Anything that was insulting to your age, your race, your ethnic background or religion,” Ewenson asked.

“Not necessarily, no. Actually, I felt like I was being racialized, right? Just the fact that the door opened and the fact that he asked for my phone number. I’ve never been asked for my phone number.”

Ewenson said any talk of the traffic stop being racist was just something the teen wanted the court to “take his word for” and there’s nothing that would be considered racist from Harnett’s behaviour.

“That’s how I felt,” the accused replied.

The teen repeatedly told Ewenson that he wasn’t sure how he ended up in the neighbourhood. He said he was following his GPS to get to a party. He also said he didn’t know who the third person in the back seat of the vehicle was, who had come with a friend.

Ewenson said it’s unlikely there would be memory lapses after an event that was the “most traumatic, powerful” and “consequential” night of the teen’s life.

“So looking back on it, you realize the story is ludicrous? The story doesn’t make sense, does it?” Ewenson asked. “Everything for you is a mindless reaction.”

The suspect said at the time he panicked and just decided to take off because he was afraid. The teen said looking back, he wishes his decision had been different.

“Look, to be frank to you, I’ve sat for two years in jail and I’ve thought about this over and over and over again,” he said. “It’s different when I think about it now and what I was going through at the moment.”

Ewenson suggested it was more likely something illegal was inside the suspect vehicle that made fleeing a simple traffic stop worth the risk.

Closing arguments in the trial are scheduled for Thursday.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 28, 2022.

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