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Edmonton

City warns Edmontonians about aggressive door-to-door furnace sales

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The City of Edmonton is warning citizens to look out for sales representatives fraudulently posing as City inspectors who claim homeowners must submit to unannounced inspections of their furnace or water heater.
These fake inspections are used as a tactic to pressure homeowners into purchasing household energy appliances.
“The City does not conduct unannounced inspections or sales of home energy appliances, such as furnaces,” said Steve Goodwin, Chief Plumbing and Gas Inspector with the City. “Sales representatives engaging in pushy door-to-door sales tactics or coercing homeowners into fake inspections under threat of punitive City action should be reported.”
The unsolicited, door-to-door selling of household energy products, such as furnaces, water heaters, windows and air conditioners, has been prohibited by Service Alberta since January 1, 2017. If you or your neighbours have had such an encounter, contact Service Alberta at 780-427-4088 or https://www.alberta.ca/door-to-door-sales-ban.aspx to file a complaint.
City inspections are required only when homeowners install a new or replacement furnace or water heater, and homeowners should coordinate directly with the City in advance to book the required inspections.
City inspectors will not show up unannounced in the evenings, or on the weekend. All inspectors dress in official City safety codes inspector uniforms and carry valid City photo identification.

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Alberta

Hundreds of young athletes grow more anxious by the day – ACAC season a series of “options”

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While addicts ponder cross their fingers at every hint the National Hockey League’s big-money dance toward a playoff schedule and perhaps a Stanley Cup final sometime this year might be successful, hundreds of young athletes grow more anxious day by day, hoping they get to play at least part of their schedules in various college sports.

And money is close to the least of the concerns for these kids.

The five-day annual spring meeting of Alberta College Athletic Conference institutions ended a week ago with little clarity on the issue although CEO Mark Kosak and various other officials in the 18-team league came away – mostly – with a positive outlook.

As expected, a wide series of “options and alternate start dates” was devised and analyzed, he said.

A committee established to evaluate likely effects of the coronavirus pandemic will meet at least once a week in preparation for “a really big and important meeting dealing with massive variables” on June 25. Many essential details applying to all sports – when to start a season, length of schedule, possible change of regular play into tournament-style competition – will be put on the table.

Progressively, Aug. 1, a date in September and others in January have been debated in depth.

All options remain open, Kosak said, pointing out that safety of athletes, students, spectators and staff remains as the dominant factor in every discussion. Principals at some institutions have made it clear they do not expect any sports to be played in what normally is the ACAC fall season. Close to 50 per cent of the principals have made clear their concern that moving too quickly in one sport or one schedule might destroy all the good that the current cautious program may achieve. If necessary, all games would have to be sacrificed.

The veteran administrator posed one conservative, hypothetical and frightening prospect: A school from a difficult place (where control of COVID-19 might not be at the ideal level) when it goes to play a road game in a safer area. Then, say, one player on the home team comes down with the virus.

“What options are open if that happens?” Obviously, no organization could possibly benefit from such an occurrence. “I understand fully what those presidents are concerned about. At this point, they’re all justified to be worried about the potential for an outbreak on campus.”

Fortunately, Kosak said, all of the presidents recognize the value of college sports, mentioning the appeal of an athletic event, additional enrolment and potential gate receipts. He did not mention students’ enthusiam when they support a successful individual or team, but that element has been demonstrated for as long as athletes have competed at any level of education.

Cost of operation has prompted some ACAC schools to make deep cuts in athletic expenses. “We all have a similar problem” said Kosak. “Each school deals with it as best they can.”

Hockey budgets have been questioned most severely. A few weeks ago, NAIT Ooks head coach Tim Fragle accepted an offer to become head coach and general manager of the Trail Smoke Eaters in the Junior A British Columbia Hockey League.

They are not, of course, the fabled senior Smoke Eaters who won the World Hockey Championship for Canada in 1961, but Fragle treats the switch as a sort of homecoming. He is a former Smoke Eater captain, having played there after his career with the Sherwood Park Crusaders. Fragle was named coach of the year three times for NAIT.

Former Ooks standout Scott Fellnermayr moves up from the assistant’s job to replace Fragle as head coach.

WCBL season cancelled ending the Edmonton Prospects run at Re/Max Field

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Edmonton

Stay off the river and away from the banks this weekend

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Stay off the river and away from the banks this weekend
May 29, 2020
Edmonton Fire Rescue Services is reminding people to NOT be stupid (our words, not theirs) and stay off of the North Saskatchewan River.  And, stay away from the river banks.
Last weekend, the City of Edmonton said the same kind of thing, and some of you didn’t listen because Edmonton Fire Rescue Services received five calls regarding river rescues last Sunday.
“Don’t let your guard down. It is very easy for you, or your pet, to lose your footing and slide into the water which will take you downstream,“ says Chief of Special Operations, Bruce McWhinnie. “Typically, this time of year, the river flow rate is 350 cubic metres per second. At the peak last week, we were experiencing five times that amount. The flow rate remains high.”
Swift moving water is relentless, making it unsafe for anyone—or their pets—to be near it and especially on it. This includes emergency personnel.
The weather may improve this weekend but the river levels will not. The North Saskatchewan River is almost one metre higher and almost twice the normal flow rate than usual. It remains above the High Streamflow Advisory threshold.
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