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Alberta

“Cheer up, things could be worse.” So, we cheered up. Things got worse.

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In healthier times for athletes and athletics, there were several tried-and-true methods of creating a debate likely to create serious response from all sides: which of the major professional leagues is best?

The question has special impact now, as hoopsters, skaters, gridders and ballplayers — joined by governments and team bosses — seek the best way to survive the anguish caused by COVID-19 and restore stability for all teams, all sports and all the fans who care about them.

All are staggering these days.

In the pandemic’s early chapters, the mantra became familiar: “Cheer up, things could be worse.” So, we cheered up. Things got worse.

The NHL fights the coronavirus by limiting information. Baseball players and owners pick this time to enter wrist-twisting events that probably will have no long-term effect. Football operators dig themselves into and out of political crisis on a daily basis.

The National Basketball Association, somehow, has found its way past such errors. Their  decision to let players put political opinions on game jerseys was thoroughly questioned but has received more praise than criticism.

Recently, in Canada, there was evidence that the National Basketball Association had a substantial edge in popularity and support, thanks almost totally to the 2020 success of the Toronto Raptors. Even the casual fan recalls the wild response generated, east to west and all points in between, by the shocking championship run created largely on the brilliance of Kawhi Leonard and the incredible effort generated by his teammates, night after night.

Never in recent history has competition in the National Hockey League, Major League Baseball or National Football League prompted bursts of wild, day-to-day support to equal the attention the Raptors attained in each playoff series leading to the ultimate victory. From a league-wide perspective, the excellence in which the NBA conducted all those games was remarkable.

Sure, the Edmonton Oilers had massive appeal when they dominated Stanley Cup races, year after year, in the heyday of Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier and their partners who marched almost as a unit into the Hockey Hall of Fame. At other times, the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs (believe it or not!) also reached that level, or came close to it. But the NHL has struggled — still struggles, in fact — to be recognized across the world as equal to basketball, baseball or football.

No doubt, the Toronto Blue Jays’ World Series successes in 1992 and 1993 are near the top in any ranking of this nation’s largest sports moments but MLB has done a lousy job of attracting Black players and getting young fans interested in their game.

Perhaps the NFL has made more errors than all the others combined. Their owners alternate between bowing to political pressure and actively defying political reality. Ignoring the tragic used-to-be “Redskins” story is an error that could emerge, perhaps for decades, as the biggest failure of all.

https://www.todayville.com/edmonton/author/johnshort/

 

Alberta

Alberta’s top health official says province isn’t in a second wave of COVID-19

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EDMONTON — Alberta’s chief medical officer of health says the province is not in a second wave of COVID-19 despite increased daily case numbers in recent weeks.

Dr. Deena Hinshaw says some provinces may have determined they’re in a second onslaught of the pandemic, but that’s not the case in Alberta where the numbers are ‘”relatively stable.”

She says there would have to be a huge spike in infections and the future at the moment remains in the hands of the public.

Hinshaw says the number of cases in five- to 19-year-olds peaked in April at the height of the pandemic, and since the current school year began infections in that group have been dropping on a weekly basis.

Alberta has recorded 158 more cases and one additional death, and  alerts or outbreaks have been reported in 97 schools.

Hinshaw isn’t calling on Albertans to cancel Thanksgiving, but adds gatherings shouldn’t exceed 15 people and those invited should be part of a family’s usual cohort.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020.

The Canadian Press

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Alberta

Alberta to review concerns of four mayors who oppose 911 EMS dispatch consolidation

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EDMONTON — Alberta’s health minister says he will review the concerns of four mayors who say the government’s plan to consolidate 911 emergency medical service dispatch services will put lives at risk.

Tyler Shandro met Thursday with Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi, Red Deer’s Tara Veer, Lethbridge’s Chris Spearman and Mayor Don Scott of the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo.

The mayors have been lobbying hard against the change, which the province says would save money and make the EMS dispatch service more efficient.

Nenshi says 911 dispatch should be operated at the municipal level because local knowledge and integration with fire services can’t be overlooked if safety is the top priority.

Veer, Spearman and Scott say the meeting shows Shandro is willing to seek out additional information from municipalities to understand the effect consolidation would have on local patients, and they hope the province will come to the conclusion that it does not make sense to change the system.

Shandro says it was a good meeting and he will consider what the mayors have told him.

“I think consolidating ambulance dispatch into AHS makes sense. It will make the system work better and save money that we’ll reinvest in the health system,” Shandro said Thursday in an email.

“Most importantly, the evidence I’ve seen shows it won’t change response times or cause delays for ambulances or other first responders. But I respect the mayors’ concerns and the information they shared, and I committed to them that we’ll review their concerns and get back to them before the transition begins.”

The fire chiefs of the four municipalities also attended the meeting.

Alberta Health Services says it has three EMS dispatch centres in Calgary, Edmonton and Slave Lake that currently dispatch ambulances for 60 per cent of the province’s population and cover most of the province’s geographic area. The government announced the plan to consolidate the dispatch service last month.

At the time, the four mayors said they were blindsided by the decision and said it would put the lives of their residents at risk.

The mayors then asked for a meeting with Shandro and called on Premier Jason Kenney to reverse the decision.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 24, 2020

The Canadian Press

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