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Agriculture

CONSERVATIVES BRING NATIONAL ATTENTION TO MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES ON THE FARM

Published

MAY 28, 2019
from the office of the Official Opposition

OTTAWA, ON – Conservative Members of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri- Foods today released a supplemental report on the rising incidence of mental health issues in Canada’s vitally important agricultural sector.

“Conservatives have always stood up for individuals and families who provide Canadians with the most nutritious and the best foods in the world,” stated Luc Berthold, Vice-Chair of the Standing Committee and Member of Parliament for Mégantic – L’ Érable. “Our commitment to farmers, ranchers and producers led us to initiate a study on the rising incidence of mental health issues; and we are committed to working with them to find solutions.”

The Standing Committee on Agriculture and Agri-Foods began the study on mental health following a motion initiated by Earl Dreeshen, Member of Parliament for Red Deer – Mountain View, on Bell Canada’s Let’s Talk Day, January 31, 2018.

Mr. Dreeshen is a fourth-generation farmer who currently farms grains and canola in central Alberta. Mr. Dreeshen noted at the time that the Standing Committee should undertake a study on the mental health challenges that Canada’s farmers, ranchers, and producers face and should meet with them so that solutions could be found.

The Conservative Members’ Supplemental Report highlights testimony at Committee hearings about the urgency of the problem, as well as the need for action on several fronts. The Supplemental Report highlights Committee testimony that farmers and producers face increased stress and hardship arising from recent government initiatives like the federal carbon tax and concessions made by the government in recent trade agreements.

Additionally, social media attacks from environmental and “animal rights” activists are targeting farmers and their families, resulting in significant distress. As well, the Supplemental Report draws attention to the important role the federal government can play in educating the public about the truth of food production, while countering many of the falsehoods perpetrated by anti-farm groups.

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Agri-Culture

Kraay Family Farm Celebrates 20 Years of Farmtastic Fun

Published

on

July 17, 2019 | Lacombe, AB –

from Kraay Family Farm

Kraay Family Farm is proud to celebrate 20 years of growing memories – your memories and ours!

The Kraay Family Farm is excited to announce that in honour of a milestone two decades of operation, the 2019 corn maze design honours and celebrates 20 years of family-friendly farm fun. The maze covers 15 acres of land and incorporates the Kraay Family Farm 20-year logo.
“We often get questions about why there is a crow in our logo. Our family is Dutch in origin and the name ‘Kraay’ actually means ‘Crow’ in Dutch. That, and there are a lot of crows around here!” explains Rachel Kraay. Rachel and Reuben Kraay own the farm together with Reuben’s parents, Ed and Linda Kraay.

“We are so grateful for the many guests who have encouraged, supported and had fun with us over these last 20 years! To own and operate a business where we get to watch our kids and our community’s kids grow up and to be part of families enjoying time together is amazing and truly a blessing for us,” says Rachel Kraay, one of the owners of the Kraay Family Farm.

Ed and Linda started the farm as a means to supplement the income from their small hog farm. Reuben was traveling after high school and visited a similar type of farm with a corn maze and other agritainment attractions and suggested the idea to his parents. “Ed and Linda like to have fun and try new things so, together with friends of theirs, they started the farm on a whim one year with just a corn maze, a slide, and a few picnic tables and fire pits,” continues Kraay, “The farm has just grown from there! Reuben and I joined his parents in 2005 after our first child was born and we’ve been adding to the farm ever since!”

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Agriculture

Scrapie, a disease related to mad cow, found in two flocks of sheep in Alberta

Published

on

Scrapie disease in Central Alberta

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says some sheep in Alberta have been infected with scrapie, a fatal disease that affects the animals’ nervous system.

The federal agency’s website says classic scrapie, which can be transmitted to other sheep and goats, was confirmed last month in two Alberta flocks.

Scrapie belongs to the family of diseases that includes mad cow disease in cattle, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans.

Health Canada says there is no known link between scrapie and human health.

The CFIA says scrapie can only been seen in adult sheep between two and five years of age and can take years to develop.

Once an animal appears ill it typically dies within a few months.

The Canadian Press

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