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Canadian hospice society provides ‘Guardian Angels’ to protect patients from euthanasia

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6 minute read

From LifeSiteNews

By Anthony Murdoch

Delta Hospice Society’s ‘Guardian Angels’ are ‘friendly visitors on a mission … to ensure patients are getting proper health care, palliative care and to avoid them from being pressured into euthanasia or MAiD.’

The Delta Hospice Society (DHS), one of Canada’s only fully pro-life hospices, is actively seeking patients in the healthcare system so that one of its “Guardian Angels” can be assigned to them to ensure they are not “pressured” into state-sponsored euthanasia.

“Our launch of Guardian Angels is now at the point where we need clients,” DHS president Angelina Ireland told LifeSiteNews. “We are looking for patients inside the healthcare system who would like an Angel, those within hospital, hospice, long-term care, palliative care wards, or people with a chronic or terminal illness.”

Ireland said that the patients or their loved ones can “reach out to us and request one of our Angels.”

“They are ‘friendly visitors on a mission.’ The mission is to ensure patients are getting proper healthcare, palliative care and to avoid them from being pressured into euthanasia or MAiD,” she said.

Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD), as it has been coined by the Liberal government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, became legal in 2016. In February, after pushback from pro-life, medical, and mental health groups as well as most of Canada’s provinces, the federal government delayed its planned expansion of MAiD to those suffering solely from mental illness to 2027.

The number of Canadians killed by lethal injection since 2016 stands at close to 65,000, with an estimated 16,000 deaths in 2023 alone, and many fear that because the official statistics are manipulated the number may be even higher.

Indeed, a recent Statistics Canada update admitted to excluding euthanasia from its death totals despite it being the sixth-highest cause of mortality in the nation.

Last year, the DHS launched a national “Guardian Angels” initiative. This program aims to help ill and vulnerable Canadians stuck in the healthcare system have a personal advocate on their side to champion the “sanctity of life” over euthanasia.

This new initiative is a “national health care advocacy program that partners our compassionate, trained volunteer health advocates, with people navigating the increasingly challenging healthcare system.”

The DHS also recently launched a Do Not Euthanize (DNE) National Registry that it says will help “defend” vulnerable citizens’ lives from “premature death by euthanasia.”

DHS says hard work and ‘trust in God’ are pivotal in helping to again offer programs

Ireland told LifeSiteNews that it has been a difficult three years since DHS was evicted from its two buildings after the Fraser Health Authority, one of five publicly funded healthcare regions in British Columbia, canceled the lease. However, since that time, “patience and trust in God” has meant that the DHS can “again offer programming consistent with our commitment to protecting and providing Palliative Care,” such as its Guardian Angels program.

“While we have been shut out of the medical system and not allowed to have a hospice facility, we have developed programs to help protect people from ‘MAID,’” thus giving them the best chance to access proper healthcare inside a predatory system, Ireland told LifeSiteNews.

“Our Do Not Euthanize Advance Directive has been highly successful, and we have given out upwards of over 8,000 DNEs across the country, with requests coming daily. Our new National Registry and customized DNE Wallet Cards are also extremely popular, and we are trying to keep up with demand.”

As it stands now, DHS is currently operating out of a small office after its Irene Thomas Hospice and the Supportive Care Centre were taken by the Fraser Health Authority. DHS was given no compensation for its assets, which Ireland says has an estimated value of $9 million.

The Irene Thomas Hospice site is now run by the government, complete with euthanasia.

Ireland observed that the demand for its DNE program “confirms for us what we already knew.”

“Our people want nothing to do with the government’s euthanasia program,” she said.

“We beg everyone to protect themselves inside of the healthcare system by ordering a DNE and a wallet-sized card. ‘Do Not Euthanize’ (DNE) Advance Directive & Wallet Cards – Delta Hospice Society.”

For those wanting more information on the DHS’s Guadian Angels program, visit https://deltahospicesociety.org/guardian-angels/

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Trudeau must prove he won’t tax our homes

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From the Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Author: Franco Terrazzano 

Actions speak louder the words. That’s especially true when those words come from a politician with a track record of breaking promises and hiking taxes.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he won’t send the taxman after Canadians’ homes. But if Trudeau wants Canadians to believe he won’t impose a home equity tax, there’s one thing he must do: end the CRA’s home reporting requirement.

In 2016, the Trudeau government made it mandatory for Canadians to report the sale of their primary residence even though it’s tax-exempt. If you sell your home, the CRA wants to know how much money you received from that sale. But if the taxman isn’t taxing it, why is the taxman asking that question? Is the CRA just curious?

Official Opposition Leader Pierre Poilievre confirmed to the Canadian Taxpayers Federation he would remove this reporting requirement if he forms government.

Trudeau must do the same. Otherwise, Canadians should worry a home equity tax is right around the corner. As Toronto Sun Columnist Brian Lilley recently wrote, “For Justin Trudeau and his Liberal Party, taxing your primary residence is a bad idea they just can’t quit.”

On June 25, Trudeau attended “a private town hall about generational fairness,” hosted by Generation Squeeze, a group advocating for home taxes.

What do you notice about the theme of that town hall? The government recently used the cloak of generational fairness to impose its capital gains tax hike.

The Trudeau government also spent hundreds of thousands funding and promoting a report from Generation Squeeze that complained of the “housing wealth windfalls gained by many home owners while they sleep and watch TV.”

The report recommended charging a tax on the value of homes above $1 million. The tax would cost Canadians up to $5.8 billion every year, and it would hit many normal Canadians. In British Columbia and Toronto, the typical home price is above $1 million.

Trying to improve affordability with tax hikes is like trying to boil water with your freezer. Higher taxes won’t make homes affordable. Consider this insight 50 pages into the report.

“Owners of homes valued over $1 million that include informal rental suites may try to recover the surtax by passing some of its cost on to renters,” reads the report.

It turns out higher taxes can make things cost more.

The head of Generation Squeeze was invited to a cabinet ministers’ retreat in Charlottetown last summer.

Documents uncovered by the CTF show staff in the prime minister’s office met twice with the head of Generation Squeeze, which included “a briefing about the tax policy recommendation.”

Trudeau has an appetite for taxing people’s homes. His recent capital gains tax hike will impact Canadians who sell secondary residences and cottages. He imposed a so-called anti-flipping home tax. And Trudeau taxes homes the government deems “underused.”

With Trudeau scrounging through the couch cushions looking for more money to paper over his deficits, Canadians should worry a home equity tax is next.

A home equity tax would come with a big bill for a young couple looking to upgrade to a family home or for grandparents who rely on the equity in their home to fund their golden years.

As an example, Canadians that bought their Toronto home for $250,000 in 1980 and sold it for $1.2 million today would pay between $50,000 and $190,000, depending on the type of home equity tax.

The Trudeau government has repeatedly flirted with home equity taxes. The only way for Trudeau to put Canadians’ minds at ease is to act and remove the requirement for taxpayers to report the sale of their home to the CRA.

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Trudeau pledges another $500 million to Ukraine as Canadian military suffers

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From LifeSiteNews

By Clare Marie Merkowsky

Despite the nation’s own armed forces grappling with an alarming recruitment crisis, Justin Trudeau and his government have poured over $13.3 billion into Ukraine.

More Canadians tax dollars are being sent overseas as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised an additional $500 million in military aid to Ukraine. 

During a July 10 meeting with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, Trudeau announced that he would send another $500 million to Ukraine as it continues its war against Russia, despite an ongoing decline in Canada’s military recruitment.  

“We’re happy to offer we’re announcing today $500 million more military aid this year for Ukraine, to help through this very difficult situation,” Trudeau said. 

In addition to the $500 million, Canada will also provide much of Ukraine’s fighter jet pilot training as Ukraine receives its first F-16s. 

Trudeau’s statement comes after Canada has been under fire for failing to meet NATO’s mandate that all members commit at least two percent of their gross domestic product (GDP) to the military alliance. 

According to his 2024 budget, Trudeau plans to spend $8.1 billion over five years, starting in 2024-25, and $73.0 billion over 20 years on the Department of National Defence.   

Interestingly, $8.1 billion divided equally over five years is $1,620,000 each year for the Canadian military. Therefore, Trudeau’s pledge of $500 million means he is spending just under a third on Ukraine compared to what he plans to spend on Canadians.  

Indeed, Trudeau seems reluctant to spend money on the Canadian military, as evidenced when Canadian troops in Latvia were forced to purchase their own helmets and food when the Trudeau government failed to provide proper supplies.  

Weeks later, Trudeau lectured the same troops on “climate change” and disinformation.       

However, at the same time, Trudeau readily sends Canadian tax dollars overseas to Ukraine. Since the Russia-Ukraine war began in 2022, Canada has given Ukraine over $13.3 billion, including $4 billion in direct military assistance.    

In May, Trudeau’s office announced $3.02 billion in funding for Ukraine, including millions of taxpayer dollars to promote “gender-inclusive demining.”  

Trudeau’s ongoing funding for Ukraine comes as many Canadians are struggling to pay for basics such as food, shelter, and heating. According to a recent government report, fast-rising food costs in Canada have led to many people feeling a sense of “hopelessness and desperation” with nowhere to turn for help.  

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