Connect with us
[bsa_pro_ad_space id=12]

Automotive

Should I buy a new car or a used car?

Published

2 minute read

This is a question a lot of people ask themselves, and you should when looking
to purchase a new vehicle at a dealership. Your vehicle has been a part of your
life and holds a certain value whether its monetary or sentimental. There are
advantages and disadvantages when making this decision and it is different for
each situation.

Advantages:
• Don’t have to sell privately
• Tax savings passed on to the new vehicle purchase
• Don’t have to wait for a buyer and can drive away in
your new vehicle sooner
• Proper paperwork and process including paying out
your current vehicle lien
• Carrying over a balance of previous loan
Disadvantages:
• Accepting less money for the vehicle than you could
potentially sell it for yourself
• Feeling uncertain that you are getting the best value
• Having to trust what the Salesperson is telling you

When you trade the vehicle in you don’t have to sell the car privately with
people coming to test drive it that you possibly don’t know which can have
risk – your Insurance coverage and theirs, their driving record or habits, theft
along with marketing and advertising the vehicle yourself. For consumers who
want to sell privately we recommend having an AMVIC Inspection, repair any
safety items, have the car detailed and provide a Carproof TM report for potential
buyers. To help consumers better understand the dealership process we need
to complete all these to prepare the vehicle for sale, pay to advertise the vehicle,
pay commission to a salesperson for selling the car and lastly making some
profit for the business.

If you are looking to sell your car privately we can assist you with that process
too, we offer a variety of inspections with detailing services and will assist on
the ad write up. We hope this information was useful and if you have any
further questions that we can help with please don’t hesitate to contact me at
the dealership 403.343.6633

Kipp Scott GMC Cadillac Buick is a family-owned business that has proudly served Red Deer, and all of Alberta, for over 50 Years since first opening our doors in 1968. Treating our customers with respect has always been our number-one priority, and we believe when it comes to selling vehicles, honesty is the best policy. Rest assured we’ll do everything we can to make sure you leave our dealership 100% satisfied.

Follow Author

More from this author

Alberta

Insurance rate increases absolutely unacceptable: NDP Critic for Service Alberta

Published on

This post was submitted by Jon Carson, NDP MLA for Edmonton-West Henday, Opposition Critic for Service Alberta

Thirty per cent.

That’s how much auto insurance rates skyrocketed by for some Albertans at the end of this year, after Premier Jason Kenney and the UCP removed the five per cent cap on rate increases that our NDP government brought in, taking a “no limit” approach to how much insurance companies could actually raise rates.

The jump was immediate.

Albertans saw a wave of premium increases bordering on price gouging. Over 90% of car insurance companies filed for rate increases as soon as the cap was lifted, and rushed to bill drivers as soon as they could. Of the companies that received approved rate changes, the increases ranged from 4.9 per cent to an eye-popping 29.8 per cent.

It was a nice gift from Jason Kenney, who already slammed families for hundreds of dollars of new costs in his fall budget, including hikes to income tax, property tax, as well as more in school fees, prescription drugs and college tuition.

As usual, Finance Minister Travis Toews trotted out the UCP’s one-trick pony and blamed the NDP, claiming that insurance companies were set to pack their bags and flee the province if he didn’t let them jack up premiums beyond five per cent.

The lobbying effort came out in full force. The brokers, the insurance companies, and the Insurance Bureau of Canada are working overtime to sell quite the sob story: a massive spike in claims costs, not enough options for drivers, etc, etc. It’s tough times for the poor, little ol’ car insurance company.

What a load. These are some of the biggest and most profitable companies in Canada, and they simply want back the power they had to jack up premiums hand over fist.

The truth is that claims costs over the past few years are level, a fact that’s supported by the Insurance Bureau of Canada‘s own data. In fact, an actuarial analysis by Fair Alberta Injury Regulators, an organization made up of concerned Albertans, doctors and legal experts, found that injury payouts have stabilized in the last few years, and even started to dip in 2019. Their actuary specifically found evidence that claims are “not skyrocketing.”

This is further supported by the Alberta Superintendent of Insurance, responsible for all regulatory oversight of insurers operating in Alberta with a specific duty to ensure that insurance companies treat Albertans fairly. In his annual report for 2018, he found on average that the claims ratio for car insurance was 80 per cent across all companies in Alberta. Not the 120 per cent figure the insurance companies trot out on TV.

And while the UCP Government continues to claim they have documents to prove the cap made the car insurance industry unsustainable, they haven’t provided a single piece of paper showing any of these companies would bail if they could–GASP–only raise premiums five per cent every year.

So why remove the cap? Well, in politics, it’s who you know. And Jason Kenney knows an awful lot of people in the insurance industry. Namely, his former chief of staff and campaign director Nick Koolsbergen, who was hired to lobby the Premier on behalf of the car insurance industry just last year. He has Kenney’s cell phone number.

Sounds like a good guy to have on your side… if you’re a car insurance company.

The fact is, these companies turn a profit of tens of millions of dollars each year. They’re used to having carte blanche in Alberta, and they want it back.

Under the thinly-veiled guise of “red tape reduction”, the UCP has struck a panel looking at more regulatory changes that the insurance lobby itself has said “could also change the rate regulation framework that governs how insurers set premiums.”

If costs are going to go up even more, who will Jason Kenney look out for? His friends and interests in big insurance? Or everyday Albertans driving to work?

Knowing Jason Kenney, Albertans should brace for impact.

Jon Carson is the MLA for Edmonton-West Henday and the Alberta NDP Opposition Critic for Service Alberta.

Continue Reading

Automotive

Is it time for a Wheel Alignment?

Published on

Bad roads can be your wheels’ worst enemy. If you drive down poorly maintained roads, drive through potholes, or even hit a curb, your alignment can be greatly affected. This can cause even the slightest, tiniest alignment issue, which can accelerate uneven tire wear. Make sure you have your alignment checked every 9,500 km or every other oil change. Your tires and your wallet will thank you later. Uneven tire wear is a symptom of bad wheel alignment. Ideally, tires should wear evenly across the tread. If you’re noticing excessive wear on the rear inside tires, you may have too much junk in the trunk or need an alignment adjustment.

Uneven tire wear can also result in less KPL’s and more pain at the gas pump. How will a wheel alignment help my vehicle? Repeat after us: A wheel alignment ensures optimal drivability. It will help your tires last longer, your vehicle drive smoother, ultimately keeping your wheels pointed in the right direction. And, when it drives more smoothly, it’s smooth sailing—or should we say cruising—ahead. Plus, your car will require less energy to keep going, potentially saving a ton of fuel depending on how much alignment was required. Tires are expensive. Keeping them aligned isn’t.

How will a wheel alignment help my vehicle?

Repeat after us: A wheel alignment ensures optimal drivability. It will help your tires last longer, your vehicle drive smoother, ultimately keeping your wheels pointed in the right direction. And, when it drives more smoothly, it’s smooth sailing—or should we say cruising—ahead. Plus, your car will require less energy to keep going, potentially saving a ton of fuel depending on how much alignment was required. Tires are expensive. Keeping them aligned isn’t.

How can I tell if my car’s alignment is off?

There are some noticeable signs that could indicate a misalignment. Just use your eyes, ears and hands. Your senses (and even the good old personal hunch) are good human capital for spotting poor alignment. Here are some common signs that you are dealing with wheels with poor alignment:

• Vehicle pulling to the left or right

• Uneven or rapid tire wear

• Your steering wheel is crooked when driving straight

• Squealing tires

Call to book 403.343.6633 or book your appointment at kippscott.ca

Continue Reading

october, 2020

No Events

Trending

X